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Full text of "Annual report of the Metropolitan District Commission"

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No. 48 



&f)e Commontoealtf) of fflat&atl)u&ttt& 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Metropolitan District Commission 



For the Year 1931 




Publication or this Document Approvbd by the Commission on Administra^on a 
kn-6-'32. No. 5666. 



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MEMORIAL DRIVE UNDERPASS — LOOKING EAST 



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MEMORIAL DRIVE UNDERPASS — LOOKING WEST 



Engineering 



CONTENTS 

I. Organization and Administration 

Commission, Officers and Employees 
II. General Financial Statement 

III. Construction 

IV. Parks and Reservations 
V. Storm Damage and Shore Protection 

VI. Charles River Basin . 

VII. Police 

VIII. Rainfall and Consumption of Water 
IX. Special Investigations 
X. Other Reports . 
Report of the Director and Chief Engineer of Park 
Organization 

Construction and Maintenance Work 
Charles River Basin 
Circumferential Highway 
Resurfacing of Parkways and Boulevards 
Alewife Brook Parkway 
Reedsdale Road and Brook Road, Milton 
Ponkapoag Golf Course . 
Repairs to Shore Protection 
Bunker Hill Monument . 
Bridges ..... 

Buildings ..... 
Drainage ..... 
Miscellaneous .... 

Plans, Studies and Estimates 
Plans for Takings 

Lighting of Parkways and Boulevards 
Traffic Control Signals . 
Permits ..... 

Ice Breaking in Basin 
Financial ..... 
Data relating to Metropolitan Park System 
Report of Director and Chief Engineer of Water Division 
Organization .... 

Metropolitan Water District and Works 
Construction .... 

Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains . 
Northern High Service Pipe Lines 
Meters and Connections 
Purchase of Water Valves . 
Additional Pumping Equipment . 
Maintenance .... 

Precipitation and Yield of Watersheds 
Storage Reservoirs 
Wachusett Reservoir 
Sudbury Reservoir 
Framingham Reservoir No. 3 
Ashland, Hopkinton and Whitehall Reservoirs 
Framingham Reservoir Nos. 1 and 2 and Farm Pond 
Lake Cochituate 
Aqueducts 

Protection of the Water Supply 
Clinton Sewage Disposal Works 
Forestry .... 
Hydroelectric Service 
Distribution Pumping Stations 



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P. D. 48 



PAGE 

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Distribution Reservoirs ....... 

Distribution Pipe Lines ....... 

Consumption of Water ....... 

Water from Metropolitan Water Works Sources used Outside 
of the Metropolitan Water District . .35 

Report of Director and Chief Engineer of Sewerage Division . . 36 

Organization ......... 36 

Metropolitan Sewerage Districts . . . .36 

Areas and Populations . . . . .36 

Metropolitan Sewers ........ 37 

Sewers Purchased and Constructed and Their Connections . 37 
Construction ......... 41 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System . . .41 

Relocation of Old Mystic Valley Sewer .41 

Extension of Mill Brook Valley Sewer in Arlington . 41 

South Metropolitan Sewerage System . .41 

New Neponset Valley Sewer . . . . .41 

Section 114 42 

Section 117 42 

Section 118 42 

Section 119 42 

Section 120 42 

Section 121 .42 

Braintree-Weymouth Branch . . . .43 

Section 125 43 

Squantum Pumping Station, Quincy .43 

Pumping Units for Squantum Pumping Station 43 

Maintenance ....... 44 

Scope of Work and Force Employed . . . .44 

East Boston Pumping Station . .44 

Deer Island Pumping Station . .44 

Harvard College Service Tunnel .45 

Railroad Crossing in Cambridge .45 

Ward Street Pumping Station ..... 45 

Hough's Neck Pumping Station . . .45 

Nut Island Screen House . .46 

Damage by Storm . . . .46 

Gasolene in Public Sewers ..... 46 

Data relating to Areas and Populations contributing Sewage 

to Metropolitan Sewerage Systems ... 47 

North Metropolitan System ... 47 

South Metropolitan System . 48 

Whole Metropolitan System .... 49 

Pumping Stations ...... 50 

Capacities and Results ... 50 

North Metropolitan System 50 

South Metropolitan System 51 

Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls 52 

Material intercepted at the Screens . 52 

Financial Statement ...... .53 

Parks Division ... 53 

Sewerage Division . 69 

Water Division ... 76 

Appendix No. 1.— Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Parks Di- 
vision made and pending during the year 1931 82 
Appendix No. 2.— Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Water 

Works made and pending during the year 1931 84 
Appendix No. 3. — Tables relating to the Maintenance of the Metro- 
politan Water Works .89 



P. D. 48 iii 

PAGE 

Table No. 1. — Monthly Rainfall in Inches at Various Places on 

the Metropolitan Water Works in 1931 . 89 

Table No. 2.— Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 1931 90 
Table No. 3. — Wachusett System — Statistics of Flow of Water, 

Storage and Rainfall in 1931 . .91 

Table No. 4. — Sudbury System — Statistics of Flow of Water, 

Storage and Rainfall in 1931. . 92 

Table No. 5. — Cochituate System — Statistics of Flow of Water, 

Storage and Rainfall in 1931 . .93 

Table No. 6. — Sources from which and periods during which 

Water has been drawn for the Supply of the 
Metropolitan Water District . .94 

Table No. 7. — Average Daily Quantity of Water Flowing through 

Aqueducts in 1931 by months 95 

Table No. 8. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of 

Water by Districts in the Cities and Towns sup- 
plied by the Metropolitan Water Works in 1931 96 
Table No. 9. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of 

Water in Cities and Towns supplied by the 
Metropolitan Water Works in 1931 . .97 

Table No. 10. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the 

Wachusett Reservoir, Clinton, 1931 . 100 

Table No. 11. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Sud- 
bury Reservoir, 1931 ..... 101 
Tabte No. 12. — Chemical Examinations? of Water from Spot 

Pond, Stoneham, 1931 .101 

Table No. 13. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Lake 

Cochituate, 1931 ..... 102 

Table No. 14. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Tap at 

the State House .... 102 

Table No. 15. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet 

in Boston, 1898-1931 103 

Table No. 16. — Number of Bacteria per cubic Centimeter in 

Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 

Water Works, 1898-1931 103 

Table No. 17. — Colors of Water from Various Parts of the 

Metropolitan Water Works in 1931 104 

Table No. 18. — Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of 

the Metropolitan Water Works in 1931 . . 105 

Table No. 19. — Length of Metropolitan Water Works Main Lines 

and Connections and Number of Valves set in 
Same, Dec. 31, 1931 .106 

Table No. 20.— Length of Metropolitan Water Works Hydrant, 

Blow-off and Drain Pipes, Dec. 31, 1931 . 107 
Table No. 21. — Length of Metropolitan Water Works Main 

Lines and Connections and Water Pipes, Four 
Inches in Diameter and Larger, in the Sev- 
eral Cities and Towns in the Metropolitan 
Water District, Dec. 31, 1931 108 

Table No. 22. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters, Per Cent of 

Services Metered, Fire Services and Fire 
Hydrants in the Several Cities and Towns in 
the Metropolitan Water District, December 

31, 1931 109 

Table No. 23.— Elevation of the Hydraulic Grade Line, in Feet, 

above Boston City Base for Each Month at 
Stations on Metropolitan Water Works during 

1931 110 

Appendix No. 4. — Contracts made and Pending during the year 

1931 — Sewerage Division .... 112 



REPORT OF THE METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION 

To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts in General Court assewMed. 

The Metropolitan District Commissioner has already presented to 
your Honorable Body an abstract of the account of the receipts, ex- 
penditures, disbursements and liabilities of the Metropolitan District 
Commission for the fiscal year ending on November 30, 1931, and now, 
in accordance with the provisions of section 100 of chapter 92 of the 
General Laws, presents a detailed statement of its doings for the cal- 
endar year ending on December 31, 1931. 

TWELFTH ANNUAL REPORT 
I. Organization and Administration 

Commission, Officers and Employees 

The term of office of Frank A. Bayrd expired on November 30, 1931 
and on December 9, 1931 Melvin B. Breath was appointed to fill the 
vacancy. The membership of the Commission at the end of the year 
was as follows: Davis B. Keniston, Commissioner, George B. Wason, 
William F. Rogers, Charles H. J. Kimball and Melvin B. Breath, Associ- 
ate Commissioners. 

William E. Whittaker has continued as Secretatry of the Commission 
and the following as Directors and Chief Engineers : of Park Engineer- 
ing, Edwin H. Rogers; of the Sewerage Division, Frederick D. Smith; 
of the Water Division, William E. Foss. 

The maximum number of employees during the year was 2,293, di- 
vided as follows: general offices, 41; parks, 1,030; water, 415; sewer- 
age, 264. 

II. General Financial Statement 

Year ending November 30, 1931 

Expended for construction . . .. ■ 

Expenditures, miscellaneous 

Expenditures for maintenance 

Total expenditures ..... 

Unexpended balance, maintenance appropriations 

Serial bonds and notes issued 

Serial bonds and notes paid 

Increase in sinking funds .... 

Decrease in net debt ..... 



$2,065,947.43 
164,123.91 
4,790,755.90 
7,020,827.24 
1,364,597.20 
1,300,000.00 
856,687.50 
2,183,415.68 
1,740,103.18 



On November 30, 1931 
Net debt $28,943,370.02 

III. Construction 

Work was continued during the year on the New Neponset Valley 
Sewer extension to the towns of Canton, Norwood, Stoughton and Wal- 
pole. The work upon Sections 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 115 and 116, 
35,480 feet in length, was completed during the year except a small 
amount of backfilling and other work. 

Section 114, 5,800 feet in length, was started in 1930 and 4,404 feet 
had been completed at the end of the year. Contracts for Sections 117, 
118, 119 and 120 were awarded during the year for a total length of 
17,550 feet of which 5,548 feet have been constructed. Section 121 is 
the only remaining section upon which work has not started and this 
will be let early in the coming year. The entire work will be completed 
in 1932. 

The Town of Weymouth at its meeting of town-meeting members 
held in March voted to accept the provisions of Chapter 419 of the Acts 
of 1930. This action was negatived by the voters of the town upon a 



2 P.D. 48 

petition for a referendum vote. The Attorney General advised the Com- 
mission that the action of the town-meeting members made the act 
effective and that the town thereupon became a member of the South 
Metropolitan Sewerage District. Accordingly, Section 125 of the 
Braintree-Weymouth line was awarded in November. This section is 
3,620 feet in length, the greater part of which is in the crossing of the 
Fore River Basin. 

The construction of the sub-structure and reservoir for the pumping 
station at Newland Street, Squantum, for the Squantum section of 
Quincy, was contracted for during the year, and a contract placed for 
the pumping units for the station. 

Chapter 381 of 1931 authorized the extension of the Metropolitan 
Sewer in the North District in Mill or Sucker Brook Valley from a point 
in Forest Street in Arlington to Park Avenue, Arlington. Plans were 
completed during the year and a contract let for this work in December. 

A syphon connection 100 feet in length has been made under the 
Aberjona River near the Wedgemere station of the Boston and Maine 
Railroad, replacing the connection previously removed above the river 
of the old Mystic Valley Sewer. 

Work upon the new Weston Aqueduct supply main was continued 
during the year. Three new sections have been laid, 24,541 feet in 
length extending from Wexford Street, Brighton to North Beacon Street 
along Charles River Reservation, Boston and Newton and through 
Maple, Galen, Centre, Pearl, Peabody and Washington streets to Elm 
Street, Newton. 

Venturi meters have been installed in North Harvard Street at Spurr 
Street in Brighton, in Washington Street at Watertown Street, New- 
ton, at Church Street, Newton and in Marginal Street at Eastern 
Avenue, Chelsea. 

The following contracts in the Parks Division, started in 1930, were 
completed during the year: 

Construction of Quincy Shore Boulevard, formerly known as Pilgrim 
Boulevard, from Furnace Brook Parkway at Black's Creek to Sea Street, 
Quincy. 

Drainage improvements in Maiden, Everett and Revere. 

Reconstruction of Fellsway West from Elm Street, Medford to South 
Street, Stoneham. 

Resurfacing South Border Road, Medford and Winchester. 

Construction of traffic circle at the junction of Middlesex Fells Park- 
way and Revere Beach Parkway, Medford. 

Surface drainage in Blue Hills Parkway, Milton. 

The following contracts for construction in the Parks Division were 
awarded during the year: 

A section of the Circumferential Highway authorized by Chapter 334 
of the Acts of 1929, from the terminus of Fellsway East to Lynn Fells 
Parkway, a distance of about 10,100 feet. 

Memorial Drive underpass at the junction of Memorial Drive and 
Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge. 

Nonantum Road Extension, authorized by Chapter 371 of 1929, from 
its terminus at Maple Street, Newton to Water Street, Watertown. 

Reconstruction of Alewife Brook Parkway from Mystic Valley Park- 
way, Somerville to Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, authorized by 
Chapter 450 of 1931. 

Brook Road and Reedsdale Road from Blue Hills Parkway to Pleasant 
Street, Milton, as authorized by Chapter 420 of 193CT, as amended by 
Chapter 450 of 1931, were reconstructed and resurfaced and turned 
back to the town of Milton for care and maintenance. 

The northerly slope of the Bunker Hill Monument grounds was re- 
graded to correspond with the southwesterly slope and a new flight of 
stone steps constructed. 



P.D. 48 3 

The following resurfacing with some changes in alignment and 
grade were made during the year: 

South Border Road, from the Medford-Winchester line to Mystic 
Valley Parkway with bituminous penetration macadam pavement. 

Revere Beach Parkway between the Saugus Branch Bridge of the 
Boston and Maine Railroad and Main Street, Everett was widened 
seven feet and the Saugus Branch and Western Division bridges over 
the Boston and Maine Railroad were repaired and widened. 

The roadway over the Charles River Dam was rebuilt with granite 
block paving on a cement concrete base and new concrete sidewalks 
constructed. 

The southerly driveway of Memorial Drive from Longfellow Bridge 
to Harvard Bridge was resurfaced with sheet asphalt on a cement con- 
crete base, and a concrete sidewalk built. 

A short section of Charles River Road on the curve near the Harvard 
Stadium was banked and resurfaced. 

Nonantum Road from Brook Road, Brighton to Charlesbank Road, 
Newton was widened to forty feet and resurfaced. 

Certain sections of the Old Colony Parkway between Columbia Road 
and Quincy Shore Boulevard were brought to grade and resurfaced. 

Chickatawbut Road from west of Randolph Avenue to near Sassamon 
Notch Road in the Blue Hills Reservation, Milton was regraded, re- 
aligned and resurfaced. 

Furnace Brook Parkway from Adams Street to Quarry Street and 
from Miller Street to Willard Street, Quincy was resurfaced. 

The old pavement and car tracks on Blue Hills Parkway at Matta- 
pan were removed and asphalt pavement laid on the bridge. Portions 
of Blue Hills Parkway southerly from the bridge and near Brook Road 
were resurfaced. 

A portion of Bold Knob Road, Stony Brook Reservation, was relo- 
cated and a contract for construction awarded late in the year. 

IV. Parks and Reservations 

The usual work of maintenance and upkeep of parks, reservations 
and boulevards has been continued during the year. To relieve the 
general unemployment situation $230,000 was appropriated early in the 
year and about 700 men were employed during the first four months 
for cutting brush, clearing and other work, principally in the Middle- 
sex Fells, Blue Hills and Charles River Upper Divisions, and sub- 
stantial areas were improved. 

One hundred and eighty band concerts were given during the sum- 
mer months in the various parks and reservations at a cost of $29,- 
612.62. Twenty-three Symphony concerts were given on the Esplanade 
tween July 9th and August 5th. Mr. Arthur Fiedler again directed the 
concerts, which were supported by public subscription without expense 
to the State other than the erection of the shell and police supervision. 
The popularity of these concerts was shown by the attendance which 
exceeded that in previous years. 

The golf course at Riverside was well patronized, the attendance 
comparing favorably with the previous year in spite of the business 
depression. Approximately 50,000 rounds of golf were played upon the 
course during the season. On the southerly side of the Charles River 
across from the recreation grounds an additional nine holes were 
cleared and constructed and will be ready for use in the coming year, 
making an eighteen-hole course. 

A special act passed during the year authorized the construction of 
an eighteen-hole golf course at the Redman Farm at Ponkapoag. 
Donald Ross was employed to lay out the course, the work was done by 
contract, nine holes were completed and seeded during the year and 
will be ready for use in the coming spring. Plans were prepared for a 



4 P.D. 48 

locker building, a contract awarded for construction and the building 
will be completed early in the coming year. 

A contract for an addition to the Police Station at Revere was 
awarded in the fall and will be completed early in the coming year. 
This addition will provide for a new emergency room, room for lost 
children, headquarters for the labor force, and a garage for the ambu- 
lance with access to the Reservation Road. 

A new police signal system with recall lights was installed at Revere. 

At Nahant a small building for a concession near the playground 
was erected and rented and two new tennis courts built. 

At the urgent request of the town of Nahant, the residents of which 
objected to the public use of Short Beach, that portion of land south of 
Wilson Road previously transferred to the Commonwealth for care and 
control was transferred back to the Town of Nahant. 

The section of Aberjona River south of the bridge as far as the 
Wedgemere station of the Boston and Maine Railroad was dredged and 
the area between Bacon Street, the railroad and the river was filled. 

Further improvements were made at the Zoo at the headquarters at 
Spot Pond by the building of new quarters and cages. The Zoo at 
the end of the year contained a total of 458 animals and birds, most of 
which are native to this section of the country. Of this total 110 were 
raised and 50 donated during the year. Increasingly large numbers of 
persons visit the Zoo each year. 

Considerable drainage work was done in different sections of the 
Middlesex Fells to eliminate mosquito breeding areas. 

At the Charles River Lower Basin Division a new refreshment stand 
was built at Magazine Beach replacing the one destroyed by fire, the 
beach was resanded and extended about 100 feet, five new tennis 
courts with macasphalt top built on the area adjacent to Magazine 
Street. The marshy area between the Charles River and the Cam- 
bridge Cemetery has been ditched and drained. The area adjacent to 
Alewife Brook Parkway between the Boston and Maine Railroad and 
Massachusetts Avenue has been graded and loamed. 

In connection with the opening of the underpass at Memorial Drive 
and Massachusetts Avenue the Commission took over the care and con- 
trol of the westerly driveway of Memorial Drive between Longfellow 
Bridge and Harvard Bridge in accordance with the provisions of Chap- 
ter 371 of 1929. Both the easterly and westerly drives are now re- 
stricted to one way traffic and to pleasure vehicles. 

Chapter 423 of 1931 turned over to the Commission care, control and 
maintenance of the River Street, Western Avenue and Larz Anderson 
bridges with the approaches thereto, including the intersections with 
Soldiers Field Road and Memorial Drive. The Commission has installed 
vehicular controlled traffic signals at these six intersections. 

In the Charles River Upper Division the two new bath houses on the 
Charles River at Faneuil and at the Speedway were opened for the 
first time to the public. 

Land near the Aetna Mills was drained, and a large section of marsh 
land along Soldiers Field Road was filled as a part of the mosquito 
control work. 

A large part of the Hammond Woods was cleared of dead wood and 
undesirable growth by the emergency employees. 

A new recreation building and shelter with a concession was built 
at the skating pond on Belcher Brook in the Blue Hills Reservation. 

The playground at Spring Street was improved by the planting of a 
large number of willows and pines. 

Several hundred feet of shore front northerly from Black's Creek 
along Quincy Shore Reservation was filled to protect the roadway and 
walk from accretion. 

The grounds around the new bath house at Nantasket were graded, 
loamed and seeded. 



P.D. 48 5 

V. Storm Damage and Shore Protection 

The high tides and storms of March 4th and 5th caused extensive 
damage to the shore walls, roadways and other property in Winthrop, 
Revere, Lynn and Nahant. A special act was passed by the Legisla- 
ture appropriating $200,000 to repair the damage. A considerable por- 
tion of the money was required to remove sand, rocks and debris 
thrown up onto the shores and roadways, most of which was handled 
by the maintenance forces, with temporary and emergency labor 
assisted by steam shovels and other equipment. 

The sea wall at Winthrop Shore Drive between Ocean Avenue and 
Underhill Street with a large portion of roadway was washed out and 
the fencing damaged. Sections of wall at Winthrop Highlands and 
opposite Broad Sound Avenue on the Winthrop Parkway were washed 
out. 

These sections of wall have been rebuilt and strengthened in such 
a manner it is hoped they will withstand future storms for many years. 

At Revere Beach opposite Oak Island a long section of the concrete 
steps and shore protection were undermined and damaged. A contract 
has been let to rebuild these steps and work was in progress at the 
end of the year. 

At Woodbury's Point on the Lynn Shore a portion of the old stone 
rubble wall was washed out. This has been rebuilt with a concrete 
wall, carrying a second walk along the top of the lower wall around 
the point. 

At Nahant considerable damage was done to the bulkheads and shore 
protection all of which has been repaired. 

VI. Charles River Basin 

Following a report made to the Legislature by the Commission that 
the estimated cost of the improvements in the Basin, as well as the 
authorized parkway projects, would exceed the funds provided, Chapter 
371 of 1929 was amended segregating the cost of the improvements in 
the Basin from the parkway projects. The sum thus provided for the 
Basin improvements is $1,400,000 plus any interest accumulations, 
made up of a gift of $1,000,000 and an assessment on the City of Bos- 
ton of $400,000. The amendment further eliminated from the act the 
requirements that portions of the fill should be not less than the equiva- 
lent of areas of certain widths. The plans have been revised in accord- 
ance with the amendment, the areas of the fill have been reduced to 
the extent necessary to come within the funds available and certain 
formal features added to the plan. A contract for the filling was let in 
the latter part of the year. 

VII. Police 

The permanent police force has remained substantially the same dur- 
ing the year, the force at the end of the year consisting of one Captain 
and Executive Officer, 5 captains, 5 lieutenants, 1 lieutenant inspector, 
1 detective sergeant, 17 sergeants, 160 patrolmen, 1 policewoman, a 
total of 191. 

Edward M. Woods has continued as Captain and Executive Officer. 
Changes during the year have been as follows: 3 officers retired, 5 
officers appointed. Twenty call officers and one extra policewoman were 
appointed for four months to take care of the extra work during the 
summer season. 

During the year 4,180 complaints were handled by the department 
before the courts, resulting in 3,944 convictions. The men in the de- 
partment performed 5,806 hours of extra duty without extra compensa- 
tion. Nineteen members of the force were commended by the Commis- 
sion for meritorious conduct. 



6 P.D. 48 

VIII. Rainfall and Consumption of Water 

The rainfall and yield of the watersheds was a little below the aver- 
age during the year. Wachusett Reservoir at the beginning of the year 
was at elevation 354.81, 40.19 feet below high water, and dropped to 
350 on February 13. The Ware River Works were put in operation in 
March and during the period from March 20 to June 15 12,813,600,000 
gallons of water were diverted, and this together with the yield of 
the Wachusett watershed raised the level in the reservoir to 388.79 on 
June 22, the highest point reached during the year. 

During the year 49,193,818,000 gallons of water were furnished to 
the eighteen municipalities regularly supplied, equivalent to an average 
daily consumption of 134,777,600 gallons or 95.8 gallons per capita for 
a population of 1,405,890 in the district supplied. This is a decrease 
from the previous year of over 1,500,000 gallons a day or 2.4 gallons 
per capita per day. 

IX. Special Investigations 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 22 of the resolves of 

1930 the Metropolitan District Commission and the Department of Pub- 
lic Health examined the beds, shores and waters of the Mystic and 
Maiden rivers and the marshes adjacent thereto so far as they are 
affected by the tides and considered methods whereby said rivers and 
marshes can best be improved for recreational or other purposes; also 
the matter of the construction of an overpass or underpass on Mystic 
Valley Parkway in Medford and the laying out and construction of a 
highway and a bridge over the Mystic River in Medford and reported 
on the same. 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 15 of the Resolves of 

1931 the Commission investigated and reported on the feasibility, ex- 
pediency and cost of constructing a non-stop through way, connecting 
the Town of Nahant and the City of Lynn, over area heretofore occu- 
pied by the roadbed and tracks of the Nahant and Lynn Street Railway 
Company. 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 18 of the Resolves of 
1931 the Commission investigated and reported on a bill relative to the 
construction of a bridge, with suitable approaches, over the Charles 
River at Purgatory Cove, so called, in the City of Waltham. 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 19 of the Resolves of 
1931 the Commission investigated and reported on a bill relative to 
establishing a park on land adjacent to the Wachusett Dam in the town 
of Clinton. 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 20 of the Resolves of 
1931 the Metropolitan District Commission and the Department of 
Public Health investigated and reported relative to improving the con- 
dition of the Charles River in the cities of Waltham and Newton and 
the towns of Weston and Watertown. 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 24 of the Resolves of 
1931 the Commission investigated and reported on the advisability, 
expediency and cost of developing, improving and maintaining for 
recreational or park purposes, certain land now under its control in 
the cities of Chelsea and Revere. 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 39 of the Resolves of 
1931 the Commission investigated and reported on the feasibility and 
probable cost of the construction of a public golf course in or adjacent 
to the Middlesex Fells Reservation. 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 40 of the Resolves of 
1931 the Department of Public Health and the Metropolitan District 
Commission investigated and reported on the matter of increasing the 
capacity of the Charles River valley sewer of the South Metropolitan 



P.D. 48 7 

Sewerage District and constructing such other works as may be neces- 
sary to adequately accommodate the sewage from the town of Water- 
town and other communities with the view to eliminating the overflow 
of sewage into the Charles River in or near said Watertown. 

X. Other Reports 

The reports of the Directors of Park Engineering, Water and Sewer- 
age, with tables, statistics and financial statements, are hereto 
appended. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Davis B. Keniston, 

Metropolitan District Commissioner. 
February 29, 1932. 



8 P.D. 48 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR AND CHIEF ENGINEER 

OF PARK ENGINEERING 

Hon. Davis B. Keniston, Commissioner, Metropolitan District 
Commission. 

Dear Sir: 

The following report is submitted of the work done under the direc- 
tion and supervision of the engineering department of the parks divi- 
sion during the year ending December 31, 1931. 

Organization 

The engineering force has averaged as follows: one director of park 
engineering, one associate civil engineer, one superintendent of locks 
and drawbridges, one supervisor of machinery and equipment, one 
senior civil engineer, five assistant civil engineers, thirteen junior civil 
engineers, one senior engineering draftsman, one inspector of con- 
struction, fifteen senior engineering aids, sixteen junior engineering 
aids, one foreman of garage and chauffeur, four stenographers, one plan 
clerk and forty-nine lock and drawbridge assistants, mechanicians, 
operators and helpers. 

All construction work and the general direction and supervision of 
all maintenance and repairs of parkways and boulevards, bridges, 
buildings and structures in the various park divisions and the opera- 
tion of the various drawbridges and locks, are in charge of the en- 
gineering department. 

Construction and Maintenance Work 

During the year plans and specifications have been prepared and 
construction supervised on the following work done by contract or by 
the maintenance forces of the various divisions: 

Charles River Basin 

Widening and extension of the Boston Embankment. Detailed esti- 
mates of this portion of the work as authorized by the legislature of 
1929, indicated that the amount appropriated of $1,400,000 was insuffi- 
cient and a request for an additional appropriation was made by the 
Commission. The legislature authorized no additional funds but 
amended the act permitting a wider latitude in the width of the filling. 
The plans as adopted by the Commission provide for the widening of 
the Charlesbank park and playground (property of the city of Boston) 
between the dam and Longfellow Bridge to a maximum width of 300 
feet. From the Longfellow Bridge to Otter Street the width of the fill- 
ing is of varying distances from 125 feet to 250 feet, with a boat haven 
and breakwater provided near the present location of the Union Boat 
Club opposite Pinckney Street and Mount Vernon Street. From opposite 
Otter Street to the Charlesgate, west of Harvard Bridge, the filling is 
to be in general 115 feet in width. Between Exeter Street and Fairfield 
Street no widening of the present embankment is contemplated but a 
lagoon 1,000 feet in length is to be formed by the filling in of a dike at 
a distance of 240 feet from the present embankment wall. From the 
Charlesbank to Cottage Farm Bridge an embankment 155 feet in width 
will be constructed northerly from the present wall forming the north- 
erly boundary of Back Street. 

The present embankment is bounded by a granite wall along the 
shore of the basin. No wall is contemplated at the edge of the new 
filling as the filling will extend into the basin on gradual slopes and be 
surfaced with heavy gravel. 

The stronger winds over the basin are from the northwest and owing 
to the width of the basin these winds frequently make the water quite 
rough and the waves rebound to a considerable distance from the 
present wall. 



P.D. 48 9 

The treatment of the new shore line is expected to break up the 
waves and materially improve conditions for boating. The lagoon is 
expected to provide a place where small boats may be used and where 
skating may be enjoyed in the winter time. The latter sport is not now 
enjoyed as it is quite unusual that the basin itself is frozen sufficiently 
to be available for skating. 

This widening of the Boston Embankment and its extension to near 
the Cottage Farm Bridge required the rebuilding and extension of the 
overflows from the Boston Marginal conduit at Fruit Street, Berkeley 
Street, Gloucester and Exeter Streets. Provision was made for an 
additional conduit at Fairfield Street to connect with a future over- 
flow chamber on the marginal conduit. The filling also required the 
extension of large drains at Deerfield Street and Ashby Street, together 
with tributary local drainage in Back Street between the Charlesgate 
and Ashby Street and in the embankment opposite Embankment Road. 

A considerable portion of the filling between the dam and Pinckney 
Street has been placed by various contractors from excavations made 
in various parts of the district. Between the Cottage Farm Bridge and 
Granby Street, the Boston Transit Department furnished a large quan- 
tity of filling without cost to the Commission from the subway excava- 
tion in Governor Square, Beacon Street and Commonwealth Avenue. 

The Fruit Street overflow from the Boston Marginal conduit was 
constructed partly of reinforced concrete and partly of reinforced con- 
crete culvert pipe laid on a pile foundation, the work being done under 
contract by the Bay State Dredging and Contracting Company. 

Local surface drains in the embankment opposite Embankment Road 
were laid by contract with the M. McDonough Company. 

A contract for the filling for the widening of the embankment, the 
construction of a breakwater opposite Pinckney Street and Mount 
Vernon Street, a breakwater forming a lagoon between Exeter Street 
and Fairfield Street, rebuilding of the overflows from the marginal 
conduit at Berkeley Street, Exeter Street and Gloucester Street, and a 
portion of a new overflow at Fairfield Street, extensions of the Deer- 
field and Ashby Street drains and local drainage in Back Street, was 
awarded to the Trimount Dredging Company. This work is now in 
progress and will be completed by the end of the summer season of 1932. 

Memorial Drive Underpass. The Charles River Basin act authorized 
the construction of an underpass in Memorial Drive under Massachu- 
setts Avenue at the northerly end of Harvard Bridge. The underpass 
has a total length of 640 feet from portal to portal with 4 per cent 
grades on each incline. Each roadway is 21 feet in width, paved with 
granite block pavement and the roadways are separated by double 
curbing 3 feet in width. Granite block pavement grouted with cement 
was used on account of its comparative freedom from being slippery 
under varying weather conditions. It is the type of pavement that was 
adopted for the Holland Vehicular Tunnel in New York, for other 
similar tunnels and it will be used in the East Boston tunnel. No 
provision is made for pedestrians to use the underpass as it is con- 
sidered that this type of traffic is better accommodated on the surface. 

As concrete is not a material that adequately endures permanent 
exposure to the weather, a material was sought which would be of a 
more lasting character for the walls of the underpass, the coping of 
the walls, and the fencing. For exposed structures granite has demon- 
strated its durability through the ages and after considerable investi- 
gation it was decided to use this kind of stone on all exposed surfaces. 
Consequently the walls were designed of reinforced concrete with a 
granite facing consisting of slabs 4 inches in thickness. These slabs 
were used as forms for one side of the concrete backing of the walls 
and are secured to the walls by the adhesion of the concrete as well 
as by anchors from the slabs into the concrete. These thin slabs are 
sawed from large blocks of granite by steel saws and the exposed sur- 



10 P.D. 48 

faces sand blasted to remove saw marks. Many of the slabs are of 
large size, running up to 5V 2 feet in width by 11 feet in height. The 
granite company gave careful attention to its product and was suc- 
cessful in cutting these slabs so that when they were set the walls 
exhibited an exceptionally smooth surface and were in perfect align- 
ment. The result of this unique type of construction is that the under- 
pass appears as though it was constructed of massive blocks of granite. 

To aid visibility for traffic on the upper roadways and to conform 
with the treatment of the wall along the basin, a solid parapet or a 
stone balustrade on top of the walls was not favored and a fence was 
designed having large steel piping for its top and bottom rails, between 
which are vertical palings of steel rods. This fence has large granite 
posts at frequent intervals, lighting standards being placed on altern- 
ate posts. The fence is very heavy construction and to add to its 
strength a 3 /4-inch steel cable was inserted inside the upper pipe 
throughout its length, anchored to the end stone posts of this fence 
and drawn taut by turn buckles. The coping on top of the walls is 12 
inches in height and this height of coping combined with the sturdy 
fence is expected to successfully resist vehicles which may accidently 
turn out of the roadways. 

The underpass is lighted by sixteen 600 candle power street lights 
on standards on top of certain of the fence posts and the portion under 
Massachusetts Avenue is lighted by ten 300 candle power lamps. The 
lamps under the bridge portion are so arranged as to be turned on 
either in whole or in part during dark days as well as at night. 

The lowest portion of the roadway under the Massachusetts Avenue 
bridge is about 4 feet below the level of the Charles River Basin, pre- 
venting direct drainage of rain water from the underpass roadways 
into the basin. Disposition of surface water was accomplished by con- 
structing a pump room on the southerly side of the underpass just west 
of Massachusetts Avenue. This pump room is over a sump into which 
the rain water flows from catch basins at the lowest point of the road- 
ways and is pumped into the basin by two automatic electrically driven 
submerged sewage pumps. One pump is operated by current from the 
Cambridge Electric Light Company and the other from current fur- 
nished by the Boston Elevated Railway, thus giving two independent 
sources of power supply. Each pump is designed to take care of the 
maximum rainfall which is likely to occur as estimated from records 
of many years past. 

As the roadways of the underpass are below the level of the basin it 
was necessary to design the floor of the structure so as to carry both 
the weight of vehicles and the upward pressure of the ground water. 
Satisfactory foundation material was found at a depth of some 10% 
to IS 1 /** feet below the level of the basin and the side walls and road- 
way are supported for the most part by circular concrete piers carried 
down to this hard gravel base. 

It is planned to operate the traffic on Memorial Drive and Massachu- 
setts Avenue at this intersection in such a manner that all through 
traffic on Memorial Drive will use the underpass and that no 
traffic on the upper roadway of Memorial Drive will be allowed to 
cross Massachusetts Avenue. All upper level traffic on Memorial Drive 
will either turn to the right or left into Massachusetts Avenue or 
Harvard Bridge. The Massachusetts Avenue and Harvard Bridge traffic 
will either continue over these thoroughfares or will turn to the right 
or left into the appropriate driveways on Memorial Drive. A traffic 
count made in August 1930 indicated a passage through this inter- 
section of 40,000 vehicles per 16 hour day from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. 

The contract for this underpass was awarded to Coleman Brothers, 
Inc. and the work nearly completed. 

Arsenal Street to North Beacon Street. Tentative plans and esti- 



P.D. 48 11 

mates have been made of the proposed parkway on the southerly side 
of the Charles River Basin between Arsenal Street and North Beacon 
Street in the Brighton district of Boston, through and adjacent to the 
property of the Butchers' Slaughtering and Melting Association. 

Nonantum Road Extension. Plans and specifications for the con- 
struction of this parkway from near Hyde Brook, Newton, to Water 
Street, Watertown, were prepared and the construction contract 
'awarded to Mr. Thomas Joseph McCue. The roadway was completed 
and opened to traffic, but the entire work was not finished. 

Circumferential Highway 

Another of the major links in the Circumferential Highway, author- 
ized by chapter 334 of the acts of 1929, was completed by the construc- 
tion of Fellsway East Extension from the northerly terminus of Fells- 
way East through the Middlesex Fells Reservation and over Emerson 
Border Road to the southerly end of Lynn Fells Parkway at the Stone- 
ham-Melrose line, a distance of about two miles, under contract with 
C. M. Callahan, Inc. 

The greater part of this route is through a picturesque section of 
the Fells hitherto only traversed by a narrow carriage road. The com- 
pletion of this parkway forms a direct through route from the Fells- 
way via Lynn Fells Parkway to the Newburyport Turnpike and should 
prove an attractive and direct route for through traffic. This location 
for this section of the circumferential highway was chosen by the 
Commission after careful consideration and studies and surveys had 
been made of the alternate route via Woodland Road through the Fells. 

In connection with and as a part of this work, the westerly roadway 
of Fellsway East was resurfaced from East Border Road to Highland 
Avenue in Maiden. 

Resurfacing of Parkways and Boulevards 

The southerly roadway of Memorial Drive from Massachusetts Av- 
enue to the Longfellow Bridge was resurfaced with a sheet asphalt 
pavement on a 6-inch cement concrete base. Drainage improvements 
were made in connection with this work by carrying the drain outlets 
through the basin wall. These outlets had previously terminated under 
the sidewalk back of the face of this wall, with the result that the out- 
lets were blocked up in many cases and did not properly function. The 
planting space between the roadway and the basin wall was resur- 
faced with loam and seeded and a cement concrete sidewalk laid 
adjacent to the basin wall. The contractor for this work was the John 
McCourt Company. 

The old granite block pavement on the Charles River Dam in Bos- 
ton and Cambridge was removed, the old concrete base was repaired 
and rebuilt and a new granite block pavement laid. This form of pave- 
ment was adopted as a major proportion of the traffic over the dam con- 
sists of heavy trucking. The discontinued double track line of the 
Boston Elevated Railway was removed, together with the poles for 
support of the trolley wires. The old brick sidewalks were renewed 
with cement concrete walks. 

South Border Road, Winchester, northerly from near the Medford- 
Winchester line to Mystic Valley Parkway, was regraded, the roadway 
widened, the alignment rectified and a bituminous penetration macadam 
pavement laid with necessary drainage. The contractor on this work 
was the M. McDonough Company. 

The roadway of Furnace Brook Parkway from Adams Street to 
Quarry Street and from Miller Street to Willard Street in Quincy, was 
resurfaced with bituminous penetration pavement and granite block 
edging installed on either side of the roadway. This work was done by 
A. DeStefano, contractor. 



12 P.D. 48 

Chickatawbut Road, formerly Administration Road, from west of 
Randolph Avenue to near Sassamon Notch Road in the Blue Hills 
Reservation, Milton, was regraded, alignment rectified, incidental 
drainage improvements made and a new bituminous penetration pave- 
ment laid by the University Contracting Company, contractors. 

The Water Division laid a 60-inch water main in Nonantum Road 
along its southerly side from Charlesbank Road to Brook Road in New- 
ton and in the Brighton district of Boston. In connection with this 
work the parkway was widened from 36 feet to 40 feet and the whole 
road resurfaced. A portion of the cost of resurfacing was paid from 
the resurfacing account of the Parks Division and the balance by the 
Water Division as part of the cost of laying of the water main. The 
contractor for this work was the C. & R. Construction Company. 

Certain sections of the Old Colony Parkway between Columbia Road 
and the Quincy Shore Boulevard in the Dorchester section of Boston 
and in Quincy were brought up to grade and resurfaced with bitumin- 
ous penetration pavement by the M. McDonough Company, contractors. 

Revere Beach Parkway between the Saugus Branch Bridge and Main 
Street, Everett, was widened seven feet on the southerly side to con- 
form to the widening of the bridge over the Saugus Branch of the Bos- 
ton and Maine Railroad. This parkway was also widened on its 
southerly side on each side of the bridge over the Western Division of 
the Boston and Maine Railroad, in connection with the widening of 
that bridge. This work was done by the M. McDonough Company. 

Plans and specifications were prepared for the relocation of a portion 
of Bold Knob Road in the Stony Brook Reservation, about 1700 feet in 
length, and a contract for its construction awarded to J. Susi and 
Brother. This work is in progress. 

The completion of the gravel surface on the northerly roadway of 
Mystic Valley Parkway from Harvard Avenue to Jerome Street was 
completed by the forces of the Middlesex Fells Division. 

On Soldiers Field Road, in the Brighton district of Boston, the road- 
way around a curve north of the Harvard Stadium was crowned when 
originally built and is of such short radius that it has been a source of 
danger to motor vehicle travel. The outer half of this roadway around 
the curve was reconstructed and resurfaced so that the roadway is now 
a banked section for its full width. This work was done by the forces 
of the Charles River Upper Division. 

The old pavement and car tracks on the bridge on Blue Hills Park- 
way at Mattapan over the Neponset River were removed and an asphalt 
pavement laid on this bridge. A portion of Blue Hills Parkway north- 
erly from this bridge was also repaved and a portion of the central 
reservation reconstructed as a roadway to improve traffic conditions. 
This work was done by the John P. Condon Corporation, contractors. 

Of the contracts let during 1930 on which work had been in progress 
during that year, six were not completed until various dates in 1931, 
as follows: 

Construction of portion of Quincy Shore Boulevard, formerly known 
as Pilgrim Boulevard, Quincy. 

Drainage improvements in Maiden, Everett and Revere, authorized 
by Chapter 456 of the Acts of 1924. 

Construction of Forest and Main Streets, now known as Fellsway 
West, Medford and Stoneham, Middlesex Fells Reservation. 

Resurfacing South Border Road, Medford and Winchester, Middle- 
sex Fells Reservation. 

Construction of traffic circle at the junction of Middlesex Fells 
Parkway and Revere Beach Parkway, Medford. 

Surface drainage in Blue Hills Parkway, Milton, in conjunction with 
the town of Milton. 



P.D. 48 13 

Alewife Brook Parkway 

By chapter 450 of the acts of 1931, the Commission was authorized 
to relocate, widen and reconstruct Alewife Brook Parkway from Massa- 
chusetts Avenue in the city of Cambridge, to Mystic Valley Parkway in 
the city of Somerville and an appropriation of $100,000 was made there- 
for. The roadway of a portion of this parkway was of insufficient 
width for four-lane traffic and the pavement had been in bad condition 
for a considerable period. The roadway was widened to 40 feet 
throughout, including some rectification in alignment, and resurfaced 
with an asphalt pavement carrying a five year guarantee. The con- 
tractor was Simpson Bros. Corporation. 

Reedsdale Road and Brook Road, Milton 

By chapter 450 of the acts of 1931, the legislature authorized the 
Commission to resurface Reedsdale Road and Brook Road from Pleas- 
ant Street to Blue Hills Parkway and allocated for the work the balance 
of the money appropriated by the preceding legislature by chapter 420 
for the taking of land for an extension of Furnace Brook Parkway in 
Quincy and Milton. After conferences with the authorities of the town 
of Milton it was decided that the central reservation in these roads be 
removed and that the resurfacing should take the form of a bituminous 
penetration pavement 40 feet in width in the centre of these highways. 
A contract for this work was awarded to Coleman Brothers, Inc., and 
on the completion of the work these streets were turned over by the 
Commission to become town ways of the town of Milton. 

Ponkapoag Golf Course 

The legislature of 1931, by chapter 416, appropriated $80,000 for the 
construction of an 18 hole golf course, including locker and service 
buildings in that section of the Blue Hills Reservation known as the 
Redman Farm in Canton. A contour plan was made of that portion of 
the Blue Hills Reservation in Canton, West of Ponkapoag Pond, and 
an 18 hole golf course was designed by Donald Ross. A contract for 
the construction of this golf course was entered into with the C. & R. 
Construction Company and the work is now in progress. 

A contract for a locker building and a professional building, de- 
signed by J. D. Leland & Company, was awarded to Corsetti and 
Arcese, builders, these buildings being located on the westerly side of 
the golf course near the Stoughton Turnpike in Canton. These struc- 
tures will be completed in the early springtime. 

Repairs to Shore Protection 

The high tides of March 4 and 5, 1931, caused extensive damage to 
the shore walls, roadways and other property of the Commission in 
Winthrop, Revere, Lynn and Nahant, and the legislature by chapter 
189 of the acts of 1931 appropriated $200,000 for repairing the damage. 

A portion of this money was expended clearing up the gravel, sand 
and debris thrown up on the Winthrop Parkway, Winthrop Shore Reser- 
vation, Revere Beach Parkway, Revere Beach Reservation and Nahant 
Beach Parkway. Other work done under this appropriation was as 
follows: 

The sea wall at Winthrop Shore Drive was washed out between 
Ocean Avenue and Underhill Street, together with a large portion of 
the roadway, and the fencing along this reservation was badly dam- 
aged. The wall was rebuilt, the roadway filled in where it had been 
washed out, new pavement laid and the fence repaired, under contract 
with the M. McDonough Company. 

At Winthrop Highlands a section of the old wall was washed out and 
this was repaired and rebuilt by a new concrete wall and coping reset 
on a portion of the old stone wall under contract with the M. Mc- 
Donough Company. 



14 P.D. 48 

At Winthrop Parkway opposite Broad Sound Avenue, Revere, a 
section of the concrete wall was washed out together with a portion of 
the roadway. This wall was rebuilt and extended to the northward 
and the roadway repaired and resurfaced by M. McDonough Company. 

On the Revere Beach Reservation, opposite Oak Island, the reinforced 
cement concrete steps forming the sloping shore protection in this 
location was badly damaged and a contract for repairing this work was 
awarded to the M. McDonough Company. This work was in progress at 
the close of the year. 

On the Lynn Shore Reservation, at what is known as Woodbury's 
Point opposite Atlantic Terrace, a large section of the old stone rubble 
wall was washed out. This wall was rebulit with a cement concrete 
wall of similar design to that on other portions of the reservation. 
This work was done under contract by Simpson Bros. Corporation. 

Bunker Hill Monument 

The budget appropriation for 1931 provided the sum of $10,000 for 
grading and new steps on the northeasterly side of Bunker Hill Monu- 
ment. The design for the new granite steps called for a wider and 
longer flight and the steepness of the slope of the embankment was 
materially reduced. This work was done under contract by M. Mc- 
Donough Company and completed except for the seeding of the em- 
bankment. 

Bridges 

The floor systems and pavements of the bridges on the Revere Beach 
Parkway in Medford and Everett over the Western Division and over 
the Saugus Branch of the Boston & Maine Railroad required an entire 
renewal. As the roadways on these bridges were of insufficient width 
for four lanes of traffic, the opportunity was utilized to widen these 
bridges on their southerly sides. This required the extensions of the 
piers and abutments, the moving of the southerly girders to the south- 
ward and extending the steel floor beams. A new wooden floor was con- 
structed on each bridge of creosoted timber and with roadway pave- 
ments of granite blocks with asphaltic filler. On both bridges the steel 
work was done by the Boston Bridge Works and the flooring and pave- 
ment by John J. Collins, contractor. 

A new floor system with asphalt plank roadway surface was placed 
on the Aberjona River Bridge in the Mystic Valley Parkway at 
Winchester. 

On Fellsway West a new floor system with asphalt plank pavement 
was constructed on the westerly half of the bridge over the Medford 
Branch of the Boston & Maine Railroad. 

On the Old Colony Parkway the steel work was painted on the Mount 
Vernon Street Bridge. 

The northerly portion of Wellington Bridge consists of reinforced 
concrete girders and a concrete floor slab with granite block pavement. 
The reinforced concrete girders on the two northerly bays had disinte- 
grated in numerous places, exposing the steel reinforcement. These 
girders were repaired by gunite applied by the National Gunite Con- 
tracting Company. Various repairs were made to the wooden floor sys- 
tem and roadway pavement of this bridge. 

The steel work of the bridge carrying the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad over the Old Colony Parkway at Pope's Hill was 
painted. 

The steel work of the bridge carrying the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad tracks over Furnace Brook Parkway near Hancock 
Street, Quincy, was painted. 

The floor, curbing and fencing of the Saugus River Bridge in Revere 
and Lynn were repaired. 

A new wearing surface was laid on the southerly half of the draw 
span of the Charles River Dam. 



P.D. 48 U5 

Contracts were let for the reconstruction of the superstructure- of 
the Revere Beach Parkway bridge over the Boston, Revere Beach and Lynn 
Railroad near Eliot Circle in Revere. The contract for the steel work 
was awarded to the Boston Bridge Works and the reinforced concrete 
floor slab, asphalt pavement and fencing to M. McDonough Company. 
These awards were made late in the autumn and the work has not been 
commenced. 

Buildings 

The legislature appropriated $40,000 for additions to the police head- 
quarters at Revere Beach Reservation. Plans and specifications were 
prepared by Putnam and Cox, architects, and the contract for this work 
awarded to Allan A. Gillis Construction Company. This work is now 
in progress and will be completed in the early spring. 

A contract was made with the Columbia Cornice Company for re- 
newing the roof on the Nantasket Police Station, police dormitory and 
the roof of the piazza around the hotel Nantasket. 

A skating shelter, designed by Putnam and Cox, architects, was con- 
structed near the skating pond in the Blue Hills Reservation west of 
Willard Street, Quincy, by Carl S. Helrich, contractor: 

Drainage 

At the time Revere Beach Parkway was constructed between Win- 
throp Avenue and Eliot Circle, Revere, a double 24-inch vitrified pipe 
drain was laid in the old location of a creek, under the new boulevard, 
south of the Revere Beach and Lynn Railroad. This pipe failed and 
did not properly convey the surface drainage tributary to it from a 
portion of the Beachmont section of Revere. A new cement concrete 
drain, 42-inches in diameter, was laid near the location of the old pipes 
under contract with Cenedella and Company. 

The surface water drain south of the steamboat pier near the Nan- 
tasket Beach police station was rebuilt and extended by the use of cast 
iron pipe by C. M. Callahan, Inc., contractor. 

Miscellaneous 

A portion of the Aberjona River between Bacon Street and the Boston 
and Maine Railroad in Winchester was very shallow and at times of 
low water in Upper Mystic Lake the mud flats were exposed. This shal- 
low area was dredged and material deposited on the adjacent land of 
the Comomnwealth by contract with George M. Byrne. This work re- 
sulted in a material improvement in this section of the river. 

A nine hole extension of the Riverside Golf Course on either side of 
Grove Street, Newton, has been constructed by the forces of the Charles 
River Upper Division and the necessary water mains and services 
installed. 

At the main lock at the Charles River Dam numerous cracks and 
disintegrated portions on the lock walls were repaired by gunite and 
the top corners of the walls chamfered. This work was done under con- 
tract by the National Gunite Contracting Company. 

Six tennis courts, surfaced with asphalt, on the northerly side of 
Memorial Drive, Cambridge, east of Magazine Street, were constructed 
and two tennis courts on the westerly side of the Nahant bath house 
were built of similar material. The courts at both locations were en- 
closed with woven wire fencing of the cyclone type. 

Granite edgestone, cement concrete walks and incidental work was 
done on the northerly side of Lynn Fells Parkway between Green 
Street and Bellevue Avenue, Melrose. 

Cement concrete walks were constructed on the westerly side of 
West Roxbury Parkway between Beech Street and Centre Street, West 
Roxbury. 

The fence along the basin wall on Memorial Drive from the Long- 
fellow Bridge to westerly of the Harvard Bridge was repaired. 



16 P.D. 48 

Cement concrete walks at various locations on the Revere Beach 
Reservation were relaid and extended by C. W. Doloff and Company, 
contractors. 

A new map of the Blue Hills Reservation has been prepared and 
printed for distribution to the public at a nominal cost. 

Plans, Studies and Estimates 

Surveys, plans, studies and estimates have been made as follows: 

Preliminary surveys for the extension of Revere Beach Parkway 
from Fellsway, Medford, to Mystic Avenue, Somerville, authorized by 
chapter 450 of the acts of the legislature of 1931. 

Plans for land takings and detailed surveys and plans have been 
made for the construction of Hammond Pond Parkway from Hammond 
and Newton Streets to Beacon Street, Newton, for which authorization 
and appropriation was made by chapter 450 of the acts of 1931. 

Surveys have been made for the extension of Lynn Fells Parkway 
from Newburyport Turnpike to Walnut Street, Saugus, as authorized 
by chapter 420 of the acts of 1930. 

Plans and estimates have been made in response to chapter 15 of 
the resolves of 1931 relative to a through way from Lynn to Nahant. 

Plans for Takings 

Plans for takings have been made as follows: 

Takings of land in Somerville on the northerly side of Shore Drive 
from Middlesex Fells Parkway at Wellington Bridge to west of Putnam 
Street along the Mystic River. 

Taking of land in Melrose for Fellsway East Extension from Stone- 
ham-Melrose line along Washington Street for a distance of about 500 
feet. 

Taking of land in Melrose for Fellsway East Extension, from Aaron 
Street to Washington Street. 

Taking of land in Stoneham for Fellsway East Extension, from 
Wyoming Avenue to Ravine Road. 

Exchange of lands in Stoneham for Fellsway East Extension, from 
Wyoming Avenue to Lynn Fells Parkway. 

Taking of land known as Moswetussett Hummock at Squantum Street 
in Quincy. 

Plan of conveyance of land in Quincy to the Granite City Ice Com- 
pany on Furnace Brook Parkway at the northwesterly corner of Adams 
Street. 

Taking of land in Medford on Mystic Valley Parkway at the south- 
easterly corner of Ravine Road. 

Plan of conveyance of land to Harold I. and Hazel G. Peabody on 
the northerly side of Lynn Fells Parkway easterly from Albert Road, 
Melrose. 

Plan of conveyance of land to the Trustees of Boston University on 
the southerly side of Soldiers Field Road westerly from Chilmark 
Street, Boston. 

Plan of conveyance of land to the Town of Winchester on the east- 
erly side of Mystic Valley Parkway, easterly from Manchester Road, 
Winchester. 

Plan of lands from Wilson Road to Kennedy Court on Nahant Beach 
Parkway to be transferred to the Town of Nahant for care and control. 

Taking of land in Milton at the northeasterly corner of Randolph 
Avenue and Chickatawbut Road, Blue Hills Reservation. 

Taking of land in Somerville for reconstruction of Alewife Brook 
Parkway, from Woods Avenue to Gordon Street. 

Taking of land at Back Street, Boston, from Granby Street to Raleigh 
Street, Charles River Basin. 

Taking of land in Charles River Basin, Boston, from Granby Street 
to Charlesgate West. 



P.D. 48 17 

Plan of land at the northeasterly corner of Charles River Dam and 

Nashua Street, Boston, to be transferred to the City of Boston for care 

and control. 

Taking of land in Newton and Watertown along the Charles River 

Basin for extension of Nonantum Road from Hyde Brook, Newton, to 

north of Water Street, Watertown. 

Lighting of Parkways and Boulevards 

New parkway lighting installations have been completed and con- 
tracts for the operation thereof have been made for the roadway of the 
Charles River Dam, Winthrop Shore Reservation and New South Street, 
Stoneham. The lighting of the Anderson, Western Avenue and River 
Street Bridges has been taken over from the Boston and Cambridge 
Bridge Commission. 

Traffic Control Signals 

Contracts for the installation and operation of traffic signals have 

been made for the following intersections and the installation 

commenced: 

Soldiers Field Road at the Anderson, Western Avenue and River 

Street Bridges 

Memorial Drive at the Anderson, Western Avenue and River Street 

Bridges 

These traffic control signals are of the automatic vehicle operated 

type and will be installed and maintained by the Automatic Signal 

Corporation. The contract provides for the Commission to pay for the 

installation of the equipment, which is to be maintained on a monthly 

rental basis by the Signal Company. These signals provide for the 

customary control of vehicles by green, yellow and red lights, as 

approved by the state department of Public Works, with a pedestrian 

interval operated by push buttons at each corner of the intersecting 

streets. _ 

Permits 

Three hundred and thirty-five permits were issued for driveway en- 
trances and miscellaneous purposes and one hundred and twenty 
orders concerning restrictions were issued and reported upon. This 
division has furnished the supervision of all driveway construction 
work and all other work relating to permits and has reported on build- 
ing operations where violations of restrictions might be involved. 

Ice Breaking in Basin 

The work of breaking ice in the channels of the Charles River Basin 
below Longfellow Bridge and in Broad and Lechmere Canals for the 
season of 1930 and 1931 was done by William J. Corkum by contract 
for the sum of $4,500. 

Financial 

The cost of engineering salaries and expenses was as follows: 
Construction: 

Salaries $75,202.06 

Expenses 3,949.66 

Maintenance: ' 

Salaries $62,174.49 

Expenses 6,016.02 

68,190.51 



Total $147,342.23 

Tables 1 to 9, inclusive, of statistics relating to the parks division 
are appended. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. H. Rogers, 

Director of Park Engineering. 



18 P.D. 48 

Table 1 — The following is a record of the traffic through locks and 
drawbridges during the year: 



Charles River Dam Lock and Drawbridge 

Number of openings of highway drawbridge 

Number of openings of lock 

Number of vessels 

Number of boats and rafts 

Lumber (feet B.M.) 

Coal (tons) 

Oil (bbls.) 

Oil (gals.) 

Piling (pieces) . 

Sand (tons) 

Gravel (tons) 

Granite (tons) . 

Miscellaneous (tons) 

Cradock Bridge Lock 
Number of openings .... 

Number of boats ..... 
Number of boats over rollway . 



Number of openings 
Number of vessels 
Coal (tons) 
Lumber (feet B.M.) 



Neponset River Drawbridge 



Number of openings 
Number of vessels 
Oil (bbls.) 
Sand (tons) 
Piles (number) . 



Number of openings 
Number of vessels 



Dorchester Bay Drawbridge 



Maiden River Drawbridge 



2,247 

3,702 

4,187 

2,585 

542,600 

228,888 

593,200 

300,000 

685 

273,605 

107,030 

3,288 

350 



426 
445 
321 



281 

357 

40,206 

795,000 



445 

676 

401,100 

4,680 

350 



119 
181 



Number of openings 
Number of vessels 



Saugus River Drawbridge 



286 
449 



Number of openings 
Number of vessels 



Wellington Drawbridge 



53 

73 



Table 3. — Metropolitan Park System — Mileage of Roadways — December 1, 1931 







o 

gs* 

«g 

fe 03 

«0h 


ca 
E >> 

■ — i o3 

P3Ph 


m 
m 

a 

o 

3 


*- 
a, 
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>, 
d 
is 

u 

d 
Ph 

a 

d 

A 
T3 


c 
o 


>> 

d 

is 

3 
Ph 

a 
o 
Ph 
A 

s 


O 

o 
PQ 3 

(5 d 
§Pm 
Ph 


& 
is 

M 

u 

d 

Ph 
.2 
US 

Ph 

a 
3 
>, 


9 

« 

a 

o 

A 
OT 

a 
a 
>> 


03 
§ 

a 

s 


*3 






>. 


CD 


>, 

0) 

M 

u 

C3 

Ph 
>. 

V 

l=) 

> 
O 

CQ 
>> 


■ 

ihant Beach Park- 
way 


J3 

PQ 

■+J 

O 

M 
m 


a 
> 

-W C3 
O S 
CO z, 

&Ph 


T3 

u 

a 
> 

o 
Ph 
>. 

a 
_o 

"o 
O 


43 
43 

I* 

9 3 

§Ph 


GO 
0J 

Pi 

cs 

u, 
o 
A 
OT 

>> 
O 

O 

3 


a 

£3 

Ph 


CO 

B 

Pi 

a 


PQ 

CD 
U 

S 

> 


n 

a) 

« 

M 

O 
M 

PQ 

>» 

a 



§ 

M 03 
& 

Pi* 

■S3 
SPh 


d 

& 
M 

b 

d 
Ph 
0. 



b 

A 

H0 

a 


0) 

Ph 


h 
O 

A 
OT 

a 



u 
A 
•** 

a 


>> 

a 

& 
M 
u 
d 

Ph 

a 

A 
O 


Total Miles 


"d 

HA 
O 

H 

-c 

c 
a 






CO 

a> 

f- OQ 
d S 

Aai 


5 o> 


•E g 
o.S 

■a 


Ji— s 

"SPh"*- 


^Ph 


>> 

(S 

is 
•O 

d 



Pi 

a 

'3 


>> 

03 
it 
■a 

d 



Pi 

a 









'3 


a 
o 


a 
"3 


a 
o 
o 


a 
'3 


a 

o 


a 
'3 


T3 

a 

o 

C3 


a 
'3 


a 

O 


a 

'3 


-a 
a 
o 


a 

'3 


a 










■< 


§ 


a 

ot 


B 


s 


CD 

OT 


Q 


S 


C9 

OT 


1? 


g 


OT 


s 


OT 


S 


OT 


§ 


& 


fc 


g 


o 


<y 


Of 


S 


OT 


Pi 


43 

OT 


is 


is 


& 


is 


s 


9 

OT 


O 






Cities 
















































































1 


Boston 


- 


.02 


- 


- 


4.30 


.21 


.49 


.48 


.19 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


.52 


2.85 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3.57 


2.07 


- 


- 


- 


14.30 


.40 


14.70 


1 


2 


Cambridge 


1.31 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


.52 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4.03 


.43 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5.86 


.43 


6.29 


2 


3 


Chelsea . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


.81 


.33 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


.81 


.33 


1.14 


3 


4 


Everett . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.66 


.66 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.66 


.66 


2.32 


4 


5 


Lynn 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.04 


.12 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.16 


- 


1.16 


5 


6 


Maiden . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.87 


1.12 


.72 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.59 


1.12 


3.71 


6 


7 


Medford . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.80 


2.61 


3.94 


.40 


3.19 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


.47 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10.40 


3.01 


13.41 


7 


8 


Melrose . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.90 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.04 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.94 


- 


2.94 


8 


9 


Newton . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.67 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.67 


- 


2.67 


9 


10 


Quincy . 


- 


- 


- 


4.55 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3.37 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


.31 


- 


2.44 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10.67 


- 


10.67 


10 


11 


Revere 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


.57 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.19 


1.13 


2.70 


- 


- 


.89 


- 


- 


6.35 


1.13 


7.48 


11 


12 


Somerville 


.93 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


.48 


.54 


- 


- 


.38 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.79 


.54 


2.33 


12 


13 


Waltham 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


13 


14 


Woburn . 
Towns 






































































1.31 


1.31 




1.31 


14 


15 


Arlington 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.46 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.46 


- 


1.46 


15 


16 


Belmont . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


16 


17 


Braintree 


- 


- 


- 


.33 


- 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


.33 


- 


.33 


17 


18 


Brotkline 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


— 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.28 


- 


- 


- 


1.28 


- 


1.28 


18 


19 


Canton . 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


■± 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


19 


20 


Dedham . 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


.49 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


.49 


- 


.49 


20 


21 


Dover 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


— 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


21 


22 


Hingham 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


__ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


__ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


22 


23 


Hull 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 





_ 








_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


.71 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


.71 


- 


.71 


23 


24 


Milton . 


- 


2.82 


1.46 


5.26 


_ 


_ 


_ 





_ 


_ 


_ 





_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


.53 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8.61 


1.46 


10.07 


24 


25 


Nahant . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


1.94 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.94 


- 


1.94 


25 


26 


Needham 


_ 


__ 


__ 


_ 


_ 


_ 














_ 






_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 








_ 








_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


26 


27 


Saugus . 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 







_ 




_ 




1.71 







_ 


_ 








_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.71 


- 


1.71 


27 


28 


Stoneham 


- 


- 


- 


— 


_ 


_ 


__ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


.02 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


6.67 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6.69 


- 


6.69 


28 


29 


Swampscott . 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 





_ 


_ 


_ 


.OS 


_ 





__ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


__ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


.08 


— 


.08 


29 


30 


Wakefield 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




























_ 










_ 





.68 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


.68 


- 


.68 


30 


31 


Watertown 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


1.74 


_ 


_ 





_ i 







_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 





_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.74 


- 


1.74 


31 


32 


Wellesley 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


__ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


~ 


32 


33 


Weston . 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


__ 


_ 





_ 


_ 





_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 




3b 


34 


Westwood 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


__ 


_ 





_ 


__ 





_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


" 


34 


35 


Weymouth 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 





_ 


























_ 








_ 





_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


~ 


35 


36 


Winchester 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




























.57 




1.81 











_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


.07 


2.45 


- 


2.45 


36 


37 


Winthrop 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




- 




- 


~ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


.20 


1.07 


~ 


1.27 




1.27 


37 




2.24 


2.84 


1.46 


10.14 


8.71 


.21 


.98 


.48 


.19 


.52 


3.37 


3.63 


1.12 


.69 


4.03 


.43 


5.15 


4.27 


12.94 


.40 


6.84 


1.94 


.71 


1.05 


3.16 


.68 


2.44 


5.13 


2.12 


2.70 


3.57 


3.35 


1.09 


1.07 


1.38 


91.95 


9.08 


101.03 



























Table 2 — Metropolitan Park System 


, — Areas of Reservations and Parkways 


— December 1,1931 






























Reservations (Acres). 


Parkwats (Acres). 


Grand Total Reser- 
vations and Park 
ways (Acres), 






o 
o 

PQ 

> 

cs 
o 

M 


n 

K 

9 

3 

5 


w 

u 

a 

a 

3 

H 


> 

« 

to 
O 
u 

a 
A 
O 


(5 

(O 

43 

u 

a 

X 


M 
u 
o 

O 

M 

o 
o 

a 

o 

K 


a 

a 
A 

0) o 
m 

■9 a 


CO 

r" 

Ph 

M 
% 

i 


0) 

> 

5 

C 

w 


a 

o 

OS 
« 

n 
J9 

CD 
"§ 

z 


Hi 

> 

■*» 

to 

CO 

a 
o 
a 

eu 

2 


ai 

t- 

o 

A 

m 

>> 
o 

a 

'3 
O 


a 
cj 

V 

PQ 

' © 
4) 
> 
O 


M 

o 

o 

h 
« 

& 

O 

43 

CO 


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i. 

o 
A 
03 

a 

o 

A 
^» 

a 

is 


m 

at 
u 

a 

< 

*ca 

43 

o 


o 
o 

a 

CD 

"is 

o 

< 


3 

H 

o 

a 

a 


a 

03 

A 
■O 
<u 

Q 


•o 

Q 
O 

Ph 

A 
03 

u 

In 


M 

o 
o 
u 

« 

O 
01 

a 

u 

3 


a 
o 

Ph 

•a 
a 

o 

a 

a 

OS 

K 


(0 

& 


03 

a 
I 


3 

0) 
X 

o 

00 

■3 
•a 

s 


c; 
> 
o 

03 
>> 

s 


A 
O 

03 
O 
« 

*3 

a 

03 
A 
es 

S3 


£ 

9 
> 

o 

3 

o 

A 

e 


a 

■o 
O 
■a 




'5 

a 

03 

a 
a 

03 

3 


A 

CJ 

a] 
O 

m 

0) 

u 

09 
> 
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u 
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O 

« 

CO 


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A 

43 

a 


a 

u 
3 
A 
a 


■ 




< 








Cities. 












































































1 


Boston, 


- 


- 


6.05 


198.39 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


145.90 


- 


- 


463.72 


- 


814.06 


- 


.27 


21.98 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


28.80* 


50.75 


- 


- 


75.65 


- 


- 


177.45 


991.51 


1 


2 


Cambridge, . 


- 


- 


- 


223.74 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


223.74 


86.21 


- 


- 


12.40 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


98.61 


322.35 


2 


3 


Chelsea . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


21.16 


- 


- 


- 


21.16 


21.16 


3 


4 


Everett, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


31.14 


- 


- 


- 


31.14 


31.14 


4 


5 


Lynn, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


19.59 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


19.59 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


.32 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


.32 


19.91 


5 


6 


Maiden, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


59.53 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


59 53 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


23.58 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


23.58 


83.11 


6 


7 


Medford, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


950.71 


42.32 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


993.03 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


~ 


- 


44.66 


265.34 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8.10 


- 


- 


- 


318.00 


1,311.03 


7 


8 


Melrose, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


180.19 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


180.19 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


14.33 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


14.38 


194.57 


8 


9 


Newton, 


- 


- 


- 


187.64 


- 


4.24 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


191.88 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


117.17 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


117.17 


309.05 


9 


10 


Quincy, . 


- 


2,562.57 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- ' 


40.75 


- 


- 


- 


2,603 . 32 


- 


- 


- 


- 


101.13 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.72 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


103.85 


2,707.17 


10 


11 


Revere, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


64.29 


- 


- 


64.29 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


_ 


- 


5.15 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


67.21 


- 


3.61 


- 


80.97 


145.26 


11 


12 


Soraerville, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5.92 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


5.92 


10.00 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


11.83 


4.95 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


26.78 


32.70 


12 


13 


Waltham, 


42.77 


- 


- 


38.65 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


81.42 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


-. 


81.42 


13 


14 


Woburn, 
Towns. 


























- 














" 




























22.64 


22.64 


22.64 


14 


15 


Arlington, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


7.83 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


7.83 


28.10 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17.40 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


45.50 


53.33 


15 


16 


Belmont, 


15.56 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


- 


_ 


15.56 


20.43 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


20.43 


35.99 


16 


17 


Braintree, 


- 


67.84 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


_. 


_ 


_ 


67.84 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


67.84 


17 


18 


Brookline 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


73.45 


— 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


13.66 


- 


- 


87.11 


87.11 


18 


19 


Canton, 


- 


471.34 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


264.26 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


735.60 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


735.60 


19 


20 


Dedham, 


- 


- 


- 


6.51 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


234.54 


- 


_ 


- 


_ 


241.05 


_ 


_ 


15.16 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


15.16 


256.21 


20 


21 


Dover, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


21 


22 


Hingham, 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


__ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


22 


23 


Hull, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


25.59 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


25'. 59 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


25.59 


23 


24 


Milton, . 


- 


1,551.40 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


269.09 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1,820.49 


_ 


83.31 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


51.16 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


134.47 


1,954.96 


24 


25 


Nahant, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


. 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


66.22 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


66.22 


66.22 


25 


26 


Needham, 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


14.24 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


14.24 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


« 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


14.24 


26 




[Randolph], . 


- 


257.00 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


. 


257.00 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


257.00 




27 


Saugus, . 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


15.89 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


15.89 


15.89 


27 


28 


Stoneham, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


705.33 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


705.33 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


.15 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


" - 


- 


.15 


705.48 


28 


29 


Swampscott, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


3.10 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3.10 


_ 


_ 


_ 


__ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3.10 


29 


30 


Wakefield, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


22.97 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


22.97 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


15.54 


- 


- 


- 


- 


15.54 


38.51 


30 


31 


Watertown, . 


- 


- 


- 


80.95 


- 


_ 


.. 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


80.95 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


80.95 


31 


32 


Wellesley, 


- 


- 


- 


66.07 


_ 


4.58 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


70.65 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


70.65 


32 


33 


Weston, 


- 


- 


- 


139.82 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


139.82 


_ 


_ 


__ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


139.82 


ii 


34 


Westwood, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


6.57 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


6.57 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6.57 


a 


35 


Weymouth, . 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


. 


_ 






























__ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


ib 


36 


Winchester, , 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


261.93 


_ 














261.93 










_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


48.28 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


.60 


48.88 


310.81 


36 


37 


Winthrop 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


" 


- 


- 


16.83 


16.83 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


~ 


.13 


" 


.13 


16.96 


3/ 




58.33 


4,910.15 


6.05 


941.77 


22.97 


23.06 


22.09 


2,157.69 


£6.07 


25.59 


920.36 


40.75 


64.29 


463.72 


16.83 


9,730.32 


144.74 


83.58 


37.14 


12.40 


101.13 


190.62 


30.42 


5.15 


79.97 


335.97 


66.54 


79.96 


53.47 


15.54 


127.61 


89.31 


8.74 


23.24 


1,485.53 


11,215.85 





* Includes Eaat Milton St. from Wolcott Square to Paul's Bridge. 



P.D. 48 19 

Table 4 — Lengths of Roads and Bridle Paths in Reservations not open 

to Motor Vehicles 

Blue Hills Reservation 



Middlesex Fells Reservation 
Stony Brook Reservation 
Beaver Brook Reservation . 
Charles River Reservation . 



Miles 

42.08 



15.30 

1.60 

.22 

.89 



Table 5 



60.09 

Electric Street Lights on Parkways and Reservations 

Lights 

Alewife Brook Parkway (25-600 c.p., 1-1500 c.p.) . 
Blue Hills Parkway (600 c.p.) .... 
Blue Hills Reservation, Hillside Street (80 c.p.) 
Charles River Dam, Reservation (1500 c.p.) . 
Charles River Dam, Roadway (600 c.p.) 
Charles River Reservation, Embankment (87-100 c.p., 

17-600 c.p.) 

Charles River Reservation, No. Beacon Street Bridge 

(4-1500 c.p., 9-1000 c.p.) 
Charles River Reservation, Soldiers Field Road (51-1000 c.p., 

47-1500 c.p.) 

Dorchester Bay Bridge (1500 c.p.) 

Fresh Pond Parkway (100 c.p.) . 

Furnace Brook Parkway (600 c.p.) 

Harvard Bridge (600 c.p.) . 

Larz Anderson Bridge (100 c.p.) . * . 

Lynn Fells Parkway 600 c.p.) 

Lynn Shore Reservation (6-1500 c.p., 24-1000 c.p.) 

Lynnway (1-1000 c.p., 10-600 c.p.) 

Memorial Drive (32-600 c.p. 181-250 c.p.) . 

Middlesex Fells Parkway (7-1500 c.p., 261-600 c.p.) 

Middlesex Fells Reservation (2-80 c.p., 35-250 c.p., 21-600 c.p.) 

Mystic Valley Parkway (1-250 c.p., 89-600 c.p.) 

Nahant Beach Parkway (1500 c.p.) 

Nantasket Beach Reservation (40-100 c.p., 12-600 

Neponset Bridge (600 c.p.) y 

Neponset River Parkway (600 c.p.) 

Old Colony Parkway (49-1500 c.p., 2-1000 c.p. 

Quincy Shore Reservation (600 c.p.) 

Revere Beach Parkway (600 c.p.) . 

c.p., 



c.p.) 



.) 



Revere Beach Reservation (2-60 
107-1500 c.p.,) . > 

River Street Bridge (250 c.p.) .« 
Saugus River Bridge (100 c.p.) •. 
Weeks Bridge (100 c.p.) v . 

Western Avenue Bridge (250 c.p.) 
West Roxbury Parkway (600 c.p.) 
Winthrop Parkway (14-250 c.p., 7-600 
Winthrop Shore Reservation (600 c.p.) 
Woburn Parkway (600 c.p.) 

Total 



1-40 



c.p.) 



c.p. 



26 
59 
14 
12 

20 

104 
13 

98 
8 

15 

56 * 

24 

24 

28 2 

30 

11 
213 
268 8 

58 4 
90 B 
12 6 
52 7 
16 
18 
51 

59 8 
181 9 



1-250 c.p., 



Ill 
8 

7 
24 

8 
27 
21 
23 

4" 



n 



1,793 



all year until 1 A. M. 

Thirty-two 600 c.p. all year 



1 Seventeen all night, except November 1 to March 31, until 1 A. M. 

2 Seventeen all year until 1 A. M. 

3 Fifty-three 600 c.p. March 15 to November 31. Four 600 c.p 

4 Two 80 c.p. and twenty-two 600 c.p. all year until 1 A. M. 

5 Ten 600 c.p. all night, except November 1 to March 31, until 1 A. M 
until 1 A. M. 

6 Five June 1 to December 1 . 

7 Twelve 600 c.p. and eleven 100 c.p. in summer only. 

8 Forty-two all night, except November 1 to March 31 to 1 A. M. Eleven all night, April 1 to October 31. 

9 Seventy-nine all night, April 1 to October 31. 

10 Thirty-three 1500 c.p. all night, May 1 to October 31. Thirty-two 1500 c.p. to midnight June 1 to 
September 30. One 60 c.p. all night, May 1 to September 30. 

11 All night, except November i to March 31, until 1 A. M. 

12 Until "1 A.M. 



20 



Lynn Shore 
Nahant Beach 
Revere Beach 
Winthrop Shore 
Nantasket Beach 
Quincy Shore 

Total . 



Table 6 
Miles of Seashore 



P.D. 48 



Miles 

1.50 
2.93 
2.74 
1.71 
1.02 
2.19 

12.09 



Lengths of Sea Walls 

Lynn Shore ........ 

Revere Beach at Northern Circle ..... 

Revere Beach at Eliot Circle ..... 

Revere Beach, shore protection, bath house shelter to Revere 

Street shelter ........ 

Winthrop Shore, bridge to Great Head . 

Winthrop Shore, bridge to Grover's Cliff 

Revere Beach, shore protection, south of Northern Circle 

Quincy Shore Reservation, shore protection south of Webster 

Street .... .... 

Quincy Shore Reservation, southerly end 

Nantasket Beach Reservation ..... 

Winthrop Parkway, Revere and Winthrop, Broad Sound Avenue 

to Sewall Avenue ....... 



Total 



Charles River 
Mystic River 
Neponset River 
Alewife Brook 

Total 



Miles of River Bank 



Total 

Culverts 
Reinforced concrete and "other masonry culverts 

Table 8 

Dams 
Beaver Brook Reservation, small wooden dams . 
Blue Hills Reservation, small wooden dam 

Charles River Reservation, wooden dam at Watertown, 220 feet 
in length 



Miles 

1.30 
.08 
.15 

.29 

1.04 

.23 

.28 

1.08 
.15 
.54 

.52 

5.66 

Miles 

33.97 
8.41 

15.86 
4.50 

62.74 





Table 7 






Bridges 




Reinforced Concrete bridges . 




23 


Steel bridges 




15 


Wooden bridges 




r 


Drawbridges 




6 


Footbridges 




12 



63 



49 



2 

1 



1 One half of Wellington Bridge rebuilt with concrete girders. 



P.D. 48 

Charles River Reservation, Charles River Basin, tidal dam, 1,200 
feet in length ........ 

Charles River Reservation, small stone dam in branch below 
Washington Street, Newton Lower Falls .... 

Charles River Reservation, reinforced concrete dam at Wash- 
ington Street, Newton Lower Falls, 140 feet in length 

Furnace Brook Parkway, reinforced concrete dam, upstream 
from Black's Creek Bridge ...... 

Hemlock Gorge Reservation, small stone masonry dam with stop 
planks, in gorge ... , 

Hemlock Gorge Reservation, small reinforced concrete dam on 
east branch of river, Newton Upper Falls 

Hemlock Gorge Reservation, reinforced concrete dam in Charles 
River at Boylston Street, Newton Upper Falls, 90 feet in 
length ......... 

Mystic River Reservation, reinforced concrete tidal dam at 
Cradock Bridge, 100 feet in length ; weirs 400 feet in length 

hock Gates, Sluice Gates and Tide Gates 

Charles River Reservation, Charles River Basin Tidal Dam, 6 

lock gates, 13 sluice gates, 43 tide gates. 
Mystic River Reservation, Cradock Bridge Tidal Dam, 2 lock 

gates, 4 sluice gates, 8 tide gates. 
Quincy Shore Reservation, 8 tide gates. 



12 



Table 9 
Police Signal System 


Miles 


Blue Hills Division ....... 


3iy 2 


Middlesex Fells Division ...... 


27 


Nantasket Beach Division ...... 


2% 


Charles River Reservation ...... 


10 


Fresh Pond Parkway ....... 


% 



Total 



71% 



Revere Beach Division police signal system, serving 11 miles of park- 
ways and reservations, and Middlesex Fells Division, serving IV2 miles 
of parkway, on wires leased from the New England Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company. 



REPORT OF DIRECTOR AND CHIEF ENGINEER 

OF WATER DIVISION 

Davis B. Keniston, Commissioner, Metropolitan District Commission. 

Sir: — I respectfully submit the following report of the construction 
and maintenance operations of the Water Division for the calendar year 
1931. 

Organization 

At the beginning of the year there were 56 permanent employees in 
the main and branch offices, and 310 permanent and temporary em- 
ployees engaged in maintaining and operating the reservoirs, aque- 
ducts, pipe lines, hydroelectric and pumping stations and in doing mis- 
cellaneous construction work. Including the temporary force employed 
during the summer the maximum number of employees of all classes at 
any time during the year was 415. There are now 58 permanent em- 
ployees in the main and branch offices and 306 permanent and tempor- 
ary employees engaged in the maintenance and operation of the works. 



22 P.D. 48 

Operations begun in 1930 to provide work for unemployed men in the 
Wachusett, Sudbury and Distribution sections were continued until 
early in August under special appropriations for this purpose, amount- 
ing to $15,000, and 224 men were provided with some temporary work 
during this period. 

Metropolitan Water District and Works 

The Water District now includes 20 municipalities with an area of 
about 174 square miles and population as of July 1, 1931, of 1,522,580. 
The Water Works lands include an area of about 19,000 acres, of which 
about 2,000 acres have been planted with pine trees. 

The works under the control of the Water Division include 9 storage 
reservoirs with 200 square miles of tributary watershed, a total stor- 
age capacity of 80 billion gallons and water surface of 8,600 acres; 60 
miles of aqueducts; 2 hydroelectric power stations of a capacity of 
7,000 horse-power; 16 miles of high-tension power transmission line; 
5 distribution pumping stations with a combined equipment of 6,100 
horse-power and pumping capacity of 282 million gallons a day; 12 
distribution reservoirs with a capacity of 2.5 billion gallons, and 163.43 
miles of distribution mains. The consumption of water from the Metro- 
politan Water Works during the year by the 18 municipalities regularly 
supplied was 49,193,818,000 gallons, equivalent to an average daily con- 
sumption of 134,777,600 gallons or 95.8 gallons per capita for a popula- 
tion of 1,405,890 in the district supplied. 

The new intake works at Coldbrook, on the Ware River, and the tun- 
nel from the intake to the Wachusett Reservoir were put into service 
March 21 and the flood flows in excess of 85 million gallons a day, from 
the 98 square miles of Ware River watershed above the intake, may 
now be diverted for the water supply of the Metropolitan Water Dis- 
trict, except that between June 14 and October 15 no diversion is 
allowed and that between May 31 and June 15 and between October 14 
and December 1 diversion can be made only if approved by the Depart- 
ment of Public Health. 

Construction 

Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains 

Early in the year work was resumed on the new Weston Aqueduct 
supply main which is being laid to connect the existing 60-inch supply 
mains in Commonwealth Avenue, near the Charles River in Newton, 
with the existing 48-inch low-service main in Magazine Street, near 
Memorial Drive in Cambridge. About 80 per cent of this main which 
will be 8.8 miles in length had been completed January 1, 1931. 

Under Contract No. 79 with C. & R. Construction Company, 9,706 feet 
of electric-welded steel pipe, 60 inches in diameter, was laid in Wex- 
ford Street, private land, North Beacon Street and Charles River Reser- 
vation in Boston and Newton. The total amount of this contract is 
$205,719.55 including $8,888.60 for 6,349 square yards of bituminous 
macadam pavement in Nonantum Road, which was widened four feet 
for a distance of 3,600 feet in connection with the work of laying the 
water main in the park reservation. Under another contract, No. 81, 
with said Company, 6,354 feet of pipe, of the same kind and size, was 
laid in Elm and Washington streets in Newton and the total amount of 
this contract is $100,648.99. Under Contract No. 83 with Thomas Joseph 
McCue 8,461 feet of electric-welded steel pipe, 60 inches in diameter, 
was laid in Washington, Peabody, Pearl, Centre, Galen and Maple 
streets in Newton and Watertown, and connected with the other com- 
pleted sections of the line to form a continuous pipe line from Maga- 
zine Street in Cambridge to Elm Street in West Newton. Pipe laying 
was completed under Contract No. 83 so late in the year that the per- 



P.D. 48 23 

manent resurfacing of the streets in Watertown was deferred so that 
the work could be done under favorable conditions in the spring of 1932. 

Before the pipes were laid in Newton, the city had planned to rebuild 
Washington Street and as the pipe line was located in this street for 
a distance of 12,000 feet the Contractors were not required to per- 
manently resurface the trenches in Newton, but from time to time the 
Commonwealth, in fulfillment of its obligations, paid to the city the 
estimated cost of resurfacing completed portions of the pipe line. The 
total of these payments to the city in lieu of resurfacing is $24,211.96. 

No settlements have been made for the easements and lands acquired 
for the new main between Wexford Street and North Beacon Street in 
Boston. 

Northern High Service Pipe Lines 

The work of resurfacing the streets in Revere in which the new 
northern high service pipe line extending from Broadway to Winthrop 
and East Boston was laid in 1930, was resumed March 23, 1931, but fol- 
lowing the completion of this work a number of joint leaks developed 
which, with other complications, delayed the filial acceptance of the 
work until September. 

Settlement for easements acquired for this pipe line have been made 
amounting to $1,675. 

Meters and Connections 

In May a 16-inch by 8-inch Venturi meter connection was installed 
between the low-service main in North Harvard Street and the city of 
Boston water pipe at Spurr Street in Brighton to replace an existing 
emergency connection. 

In September a 20-inch by S^-inch Venturi meter connection was 
installed between the new Weston Aqueduct supply main in Washing- 
ton Street and the city of Newton water pipe at Watertown Street in 
West Newton, and in November a 20-inch by S^-inch Venturi meter 
connection was installed between the new supply main and the city 
water pipe at Church Street in the northeast part of the city. 

In November a 12-inch by 5 1 ,4-inch Venture meter connection was in- 
stalled between low-service main and the city of Chelsea water pipe in 
Marginal Street at Eastern Avenue at the expense of the city. 

The total expenditures for meters and connections for 1931 is 
$10,290.21. 

Purchase of Water Valves 

Contract No. 80 for furnishing 73 water valves from 12 inches to 
36 inches in diameter was made with the Crane Company March 2, 1931. 
All of the valves have been delivered. The amount of the contract is 
$32,621.10. 

Additional Pumping Equipment for Chestnut Hill Station No. 1 

Plans and specifications were prepared and bids were received Decem- 
ber 31 for the installation, in Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 1, of 
two steam turbine driven centrifugal pumping units for the southern 
high service. The large unit of 1,400 horse-power will have a pumping 
capacity of 50 million gallons a day, the small unit of 625 horse-power 
will have a capacity of 15 million gallons a day. Of the $150,000 required 
for this installation, the first installment of $50,000 was appropriated 
April 24, Acts of 1931, Chapter 245, Item 695. 

Maintenance 

Precipitation and Yield of Watersheds 

The total precipitation during 1931 on the Wachusett watershed, 
44.35 inches, is 0.49 of an inch below the average for 35 years; on the 



24 



P.D. 48 



Sudbury watershed 40.83 inches is 3.41 inches below the average for 57 
years; and on the Cochituate watershed 42.92 inches is 1.83 inches below 
the average for 69 years. 

The average daily yield per square mile from the watersheds was 
972,000 gallons from the Wachusett, which is 90 per cent of the average 
for 35 years, 889,000 gallons from the Sudbury, which is 92 per cent of 
the average for 57 years, and 1,022,000 gallons from the Cochituate 
which is 110 per cent of the average for 69 years. 

The city of Worcester diverted the entire yield of the 9.35 square 
miles of watershed formerly tributary to the Wachusetts Reservoir, 
which it acquired for its water supply in 1911, and also pumped 73,100,- 
000 gallons of water from the reservoir with its emergency pumping 
plant at South Bay in Boylston. 

From March 20, 1931 to the end of the year 12,920,600,000 gallons of 
water was diverted into Wachusett Reservoir from the Ware River 
watershed above Coldbrook through the new tunnel. 

During the year 3,856,650,000 gallons of water was drawn for con- 
sumption from Framingham Reservoir No. 1, Ashland, Hopkinton and 
Whitehall reservoirs and the Sudbury River above Cordaville and 5,211,- 
800,000 gallons was drawn from Lake Cochituate. 

Storage Reservoirs 

The capacities of the storage reservoirs of the Metropolitan Water Works, 
the elevation of the water surfaces and the quantity of water stored in each 
reservoir at the beginning and at the end of the year are shown by the fol- 
lowing table: 





Eleva- 
tion 1 

of 
High 

Water 
to top 

of flash 

boards 


Total 
Capacity 
(Gallons) 

1 


Jan. 1, 1931 


Jan. 1, 1932 


Storage Reservoirs 


Eleva- 
tion 1 
of 

Water 
Sur- 
face 


Available 

Storage 

(Gallons) 


Eleva- 
tion 1 
of 

Water 
Sur- 
face 


Available 

Storage 

(Gallons) 


Cochituate Watershed: — 
Lake Cochituate 2 

Sudbury Watershed: — 
Sudbury Reservoir 
Framingham Reservoir No. 1 
Framingham Reservoir No. 2 
Framingham Reservoir No. 3 
Ashland Reservoir 
Hopkinton Reservoir . 
Whitehall Reservoir . 

Wachusett Watershed: — 
Wachusett Reservoir . 


144.36 

260.00 
169.32 
177.12 
186.74 
225.21 
305.00 
337.91 

396.50 


2,097,100,000 

7,253,500,000 
289,900,000 
529,900,000 
1,180,000,000 
1,416,400,000 
1,520,900,000 
1,256,900,000 

67,000,000,000 


142.90 

250 . 82 
167.66 
175.92 
183.98 
203 . 36 
286.71 
333.71 

354.81 


1,656,000,000 

2,403,400,000 
124,100,000 
428,400,000 
797,900,000 
34,400,000 
118,300,000 
172,000,000 

13,260,000,000 


140.85 

258.15 
167.67 
175.93 
184.97 
225.30 
297 . 66 
336 . 40 

374.77 


1,187,500,000 

5,229,.'00,000 
124,800,000 
428,800,000 
876,600,000 

1,005,300,000 
632,800,000 
658,700,000 

29,923,000,000 


Totals .... 


- 


82,544,600,000 


- 


18,994,800,000 


- 


40,067,000,000 



1 Elevation in feet above Boston City Base. 

2 Excluding Dudley Pond which was abandoned April 3, 1916. 

The total storage capacity shown in the third column of the table is 
to the bottom of the reservoirs. The available storage shown in col- 
umns 5 and 7 is the quantity that can be conveniently used for 
consumption. 

Wachusett Reservoir 

On January 1, 1931 the water in Wachusett Reservoir was 40.19 feet 
below high-water line and the quantity of water stored in the reservoir 
was 24,260,000,000 gallons. On February 13, the water reached the low- 
est stage recorded since the reservoir first filled in 1908, it was then at 
elevation 350 and 45 feet below high-water line, and there was then 
only 10,944,400,000 gallons of water stored in the reservoir that could 



P.D. 48 25 

be conveniently used for water supply ; but as a result of the large yield 
during the spring the water rose in the reservoir to elevation 388.79 
on June 22, the quantity of water stored in the reservoir having been 
increased 35,867,200,000 gallons. For 10 weeks during this filling period 
no water was drawn from the reservoir for consumption, and between 
March 20 and June 15 and between October 14 and the end of the year 
the flow of the Ware River at Coldbrook, in excess of 85,000,000 gallons 
a day, was diverted into the Wachusett Reservoir through the new tun- 
nel. From June 22 to the end of the year water was drawn from the 
reservoir regularly for consumption and at the close of the year had 
been drawn down to elevation 374.77 or 20.23 feet below high-water 
line, leaving 30,923,000,000 gallons in the reservoir available for water 
supply purposes. 

Under the provisions of Acts of 1923 Chapter 348 the town of Clinton 
pumped 10,100,000 gallons of water from the reservoir on 7 days in Feb- 
ruary, 5 days in May and 7 days in June to maintain pressures in its 
distribution system during periods of high consumption and when re- 
pairs were being made. 

The city of Worcester pumped 73,100,000 gallons of water from the 
reservoir from January 1 to 14, inclusive, on account of the low water 
in its reservoir, as its new works, for taking water from the Quinapoxet 
Pond drainage area in the Wachusett watershed as authorized by the 
Acts of 1926 Chapter 375, Section 12, were not completed until July. 
No water was diverted from Quinapoxet Pond by the city during the 
year. 

In compliance with the provisions of General Laws Chapter 92, Sec- 
tion 14, that at least 12 million gallons of water shall be discharged 
each week from the reservoir into the Nashua River to maintain a flow 
in the river below the dam, 625,600,000 gallons of water was discharged 
from the reservoir into the river during the year. 

The usual regular work has been done in connection with the main- 
tenance and operation of the Wachusett Reservoir. 

Sudbury Reservoir' 

At the beginning of the year the water in Sudbury Reservoir was 
about 8 feet below the crest of the overflow at the dam, having been 
drawn down in November, 1930 to facilitate the work of widening and 
rebuilding Worcester Street in Southborough as a State highway by 
the Department of Public Works. This work includes the extension of 
several culverts and the construction, on Water Works land, of high- 
way embankments which in some places extend out into the reservoir. 

From January 1 to August 10 the water was kept approximately 4 
feet below the crest of the overflow at the dam; the water was then 
allowed to rise in the reservoir until September 20 when it was filled 
to the crest of the overflow. From December 3, when the flashboards 
were removed from the overflow, to the end of the year the water was 
held about a foot below the overflow. 

The usual work was done in connection with the maintenance and 
operation of the reservoir. The dump truck which had been used at 
the reservoir for several years was replaced by a new truck during 
the year. 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3 

Flashboards were kept on the overflow of the dam at Framingham 
Reservoir No. 3 during the entire year so that the reservoir could be 
replenished with water from Sudbury Reservoir as required to con- 
veniently control the flow in the Sudbury Aqueduct which was supplied 
almost entirely from this reservoir. The highest elevation of the water 
in the reservoir during the year was 185.74 on April 7 and the lowest 
was 181.41 on February 26. No water was wasted from the reservoir 
during the year. The work required to maintain and operate the reser- 



26 P.D. 48 

voir has been performed in the usual manner. Some of the filling for 
the new State highway along the Worcester Turnpike extended into the 
small arms of the reservoir south of the turnpike. 

Ashland, Hopkinton and Whitehall Reservoirs 

At the beginning of the year the water had been drawn down nearly 
22 feet in Ashland Reservoir, but on account of abundant spring yield 
the reservoir had filled to high-water line by April 10, and remained 
full for the rest of the year; although 803,600,000 gallons of water was 
drawn from the reservoir for water supply, February 19 to April 1 and 
April 8 to June 16. A bathroom was installed in the department house 
occupied by the attendant. 

The water in Hopkinton Reservoir was about 18 feet below full reser- 
voir level at the beginning of the year, it rose steadily until high-water 
line was reached on April 1 and remained near that level until June 20, 
the water then receded and was 8.2 feet below high water August 24; 
during the remaining 4 months it rose slowly and was 7.5 feet down at 
the close of the year. Water was diverted from the reservoir to Sudbury 
Reservoir from February 10 to March 3, one hour on March 15 and 
from March 31 to August 24. The total diversion during the year from 
Hopkinton Reservoir to Sudbury Reservoir was 2,243,120,000 gallons. 
From the Sudbury River above Cordaville 466,330,000 gallons was di- 
verted to the Sudbury Reservoir, and from Whitehall Reservoir to 
Hopkinton Reservoir the total diversion was about 400,000,000 gallons. 

The water in Whitehall Reservoir rose 4.2 feet from January 1 to 
April 10 when it reached high-water line. From April 13 to August 11 
water was diverted from Whitehall to Hopkinton Reservoir, the water 
in Whitehall Reservoir being drawn down 1.5 feet and remained at that 
level until the end of the year. A small flow was maintained through 
the pipe line, to keep the water from freezing, from January 1 to 
March 25 and from December 8 to 31. From June 10 to 19 it was neces- 
sary to waste water from Whitehall Reservoir into the brook below the 
dam to keep the water from rising too high in the reservoir. 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2 and Farm Pond 

Water is seldom drawn from Framingham Reservoirs No. 1 and No. 
2 for water supply but on account of extremely low water in the other 
reservoirs 343,600,000 gallons was used from Reservoir No. 1 January 
12 to February 19 as analyses showed that the water was then of very 
good quality. As usual 1.5 million gallons was discharged, through the 
calibrated gate at Dam No. 1, into the Sudbury River as required by law. 

The town of Framingham pumped 143,700,000 gallons of water from 
its filter galleries on the shore of Farm Pond from March 7 to Novem- 
ber 3 and from December 19 to the end of the year. 

Under legislative authority the Boston & Albany Railroad took 
approximately 21,900,000 gallons and the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad about 13,500,000 gallons of water directly from 
Farm Pond for use in locomotives and 67,800,000 gallons of water was 
wasted from the pond into the Sudbury River. 

In connection with the rebuilding of the Worcester Turnpike as a 
State highway the Department of Public Works constructed a new 
bridge over the channel between Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 3, 
and also reinforced both of the 48-inch pipe lines at this place. 

Lake Cochituate 
From January 1 to October 26, inclusive, 5,211,800,000 gallons of water 
was drawn from Lake Cochituate for water supply. The water in the 
lake was 1.5 feet below high-water line at the beginning of the year, 4 
inches above on June 11, 5 feet below on October 27 and 3.5 feet below 
high water at the close of the year. 



P.D. 48 27 

During March, April, May and June 1,446,400,000 gallons of water was 
wasted to keep the water from rising too high in the lake. 

Aqueducts 

The Wachusett Aqueduct was used on 246 days during the year, for a 
total time of 105 days, 14 hours and 44 minutes. The total quantity of 
water drawn from the Wachusett Reservoir through the aqueduct is 
33,926,100,000 gallons, an average draft of 92,948,000 gallons for every 
day in the year, and all but 24,000,000 gallons of the water was used 
to generate electric energy at the Wachusett Power Station before it 
was discharged into the aqueduct. 

The Westborough State Hospital pumped 57,521,000 gallons of water 
from the aqueduct at the terminal chamber in Marlborough during the 
year, an average daily pumpage of 158,000 gallons. This is the small- 
est daily consumption at this institution for years and is due to a sav- 
ing resulting from an efficient system of regular inspection of water 
fixtures and the use of water. 

In connection with the reconstruction of the Boston-New York Post 
Road in Northborough, a reinforced concrete plate girder bridge was 
built by the Public Works Department to carry the highway over the 
aqueduct at Mitchell Swamp and as a further safeguard steel sheet 
piling was driven into the hard ground under the swamp parallel with 
and on each side of the aqueduct for a distance of 150 feet or the entire 
width of the highway embankment. 

The Weston Aqueduct was used every day in the year, the total time 
in service amounting to 312 days, 17 hours and 59 minutes. During this 
time 32,205,600,000 gallons of water was conveyed from the Sudbury 
Reservoir to the Weston Reservoir, of which 2,004,400,000 gallons was 
by-passed into the aqueduct through the gate under Unit No. 1 on 
account of low water in the Sudbury Reservoir, and the remainder was 
used to generate electric energy before it was discharged into the aque- 
duct. The average daily flow in this aqueduct for the entire year was 
88,234,521 gallons. 

The house and barn at the White place in Nobscot were painted and 
the barn was shingled with asphalt shingles. 

The Sudbury Aqueduct was in use throughout the year with the excep- 
tion of a short interruption on October 14 and again on October 15 
while changing the chlorinator suction pipe. The aqueduct was sup- 
plied with 9,004,900,000 gallons of water from Framingham Reservoir 
No. 3 with 803,600,000 gallons of water from Ashland Reservoir 
and with 343,600,000 gallons of water from Framingham Reservoir 
No. 1, a total of 10,152,100,000 gallons, of which the town of Framing- 
ham pumped 376,100,000 gallons for its supply and the remaining 9,776,- 
000,000 gallons, equivalent to an average of 26,783,562 gallons a day, 
was delivered to Chestnut Hill Reservoir for consumption in the Metro- 
politan Water District. 

In October the town of Framingham completed its new pumping sta- 
tion which is located on Metropolitan Water Works land on the east 
side of Winter Street near the aqueduct, but on account of construc- 
tion troubles it has not been used for regular service. 

The Cochituate Aqueduct was in service January 1 to October 26, a 
total of 299 days. While the aqueduct was in use 5,211,800,000 gallons 
of water was conveyed from Lake Cochituate to Chestnut Hill Reser- 
voir, equivalent to an average flow of 14,278,904 gallons a day for the 
entire year. 

The regular maintenance of the aqueduct lands and structures was 
attended to in the usual manner. 

Protection of the Water Supply 
To prevent pollution of the water supply a Sanitary Engineer and 
two aids and six watchmen have been employed throughout the year to 



28 P.D. 48 

inspect ice cutting and other operations, and the condition of the prem- 
ises on the watersheds, and to enforce the sanitary rules and regula- 
tions. The Sanitary Engineer and one aid also made a sanitary census 
of the Swift River watershed for the Metropolitan District Water 
Supply Commission. 

The water Division forces have operated the filter-beds on Beaman 
Street in West Boylston throughout the year to purify the sewage from 
the Worcester County Training School, and the Gates Terrace filter- 
beds at Sterling Junction from May 1 to November 29 to purify the 
sewage from summer cottages in that vicinity. Sewage from the Eagle- 
ville Mill and the Mt. Pleasant House in Holden, and from the Fay 
School and Deerfoot Farm sausage factory and dairy in Southborough 
was purified by privately owned and operated filter-beds. 

Surface water from thickly settled drainage areas of 525 acres in 
the village of Sterling from 1,280 acres along the brook near Maple 
Street in Marlborough, and from 700 acres along Pegan Brook and an 
intercepting ditch in Natick was purified by filters operated by Water 
Division forces before it flowed into the water supply, with the excep- 
tion of an overflow of 15,247,000 gallons from Pegan Brook and 69,794, 
000 gallons from the intercepting ditch in Natick, and this water that 
overflowed was sterilized with chlorine before it entered Lake Cochituate. 

At the Pegan Brook filters the pumping station was operated on 235 
days and 247,150,000 gallons of water was pumped to the filters, an 
average of 677,123 gallons a day for the entire year. The cost of oper- 
ating the station and caring for grounds and filter beds was $6,369.22 
for labor, $445.86 for fuel, and $157.90 for supplies and repairs, a total 
of $6,972.98, which is $28.21 per million gallons filtered. The fuel cost 
per million foot gallons was $0.15. 

The cost of protecting the water supply by filtration was $1,232 for 
the Wachusett, $4,773.59 for the Sudbury and $6,972.98 for the Cochitu- 
ate watershed. 

The new sewage disposal works constructed by Regis College to pre- 
vent pollution of the water in the Weston Aqueduct and Reservoir were 
put into regular service December 7. Prior to that time the sewage was 
sterilized with chlorine by the College before it was discharged on the 
old filter-beds and the surface water in a nearby brook was sterilized 
by Metropolitan Water Works employees. 

The water diverted to the Sudbury Reservoir from the Hopkinton 
Reservoir and from the Sudbury River above Cordaville was sterilized 
with chlorine at the Cordaville pumping station. 

All water drawn for consumption during the year was sterilized with 
chlorine as follows: Water from Ashland Reservoir and Framingham 
Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 3 at the entrance to the Sudbury Aqueduct; water 
from Lake Cochituate as it flowed from the Cochituate Aqueduct into 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir and water drawn from the Weston Reservoir 
at the screen chamber as it flowed from the reservoir. 

The total amount of chlorine used was as follows: Sudbury Section 
57,256 pounds, Distribution Section 153,152 pounds, total 210,408 
pounds. The total expenditure for chlorine used in sterilizing the 
water supply during the year was $8,951.74. 

Improved brook channels, ditches, culverts and watering places were 
maintained in the usual manner. The cost of maintaining 35 miles of 
drainage ditches on all of the watersheds was $8,055. 

Clinton Sewage Disposal Works 
The works constructed under the provision of Acts of 1898, Chapter 
557, for disposing of the sewage of the town of Clinton, were operated 
on 365 days. The average daily quantity of sewage pumped and dis- 
posed of was 1,334,000 gallons. The cost of operating the pumping sta- 
tion was $3,227.45 which is $6.63 per million gallons and is $0.13 per 



P.D. 48 29 

million foot gallons. The cost of operating the niters and intercepting 
sewer was $10,675.92, which is $21.93 per million gallons disposed of 
by sedimentation, nitration and irrigation. 

Forestry 

In the Wachusett Section 111,500 white pine, 5,000 Austrian pine and 
5,000 Scotch pine transplants were set out in new plantings. In the Sud- 
bury section 2,950 white pine, 1,000 red pine and 230 spruce transplants 
were set out in new plantings. In the Distribution Section 7,800 white 
pines, 5,550 Scotch pines, 2,500 spruce and 18 cedar trees were set out 
in new plantings. 

In the Wachusett Section about 70 miles of marginal fire guards and 
forest roads, 15 to 45 feet in width, were mowed and the brush and 
weeds were burned at a cost of about $70 a mile and the undergrowth 
was cleared from a strip of Water Works land about 100 feet in width 
and 15% miles in length fronting on main highways around the reser- 
voir, and the lower branches of the trees were cut off for a height of 
about 6 feet. This work covered an area of about 230 acres and cost 
about $25 an acre. 

About 11,300 chestnut fence posts, 41,000 feet of chestnut lumber 
and 52,000 feet of white pine lumber was obtained from wood cutting 
operations in the Wachusett Section. 

The total expenditure for forestry was $37,567.46, of which $3,120 
was expended for protecting the trees and shrubs from insects. 

Hydroelectric Service 

The hydroelectric power stations at the Wachusett Dam in Clinton 
and at the Sudbury Dam in Southborough are operated by the water 
drawn for water supply from the reservoirs above these dams. 

Only 9,469,596 kilowatt hours of electric energy was developed at the 
power stations in 1931, or approximately 70 per cent of the usual output. 
On account of low water in Wachusett Reservoir early in the year the 
Wachusett station was not operated for ten weeks, from February 15 to 
28 and from March 15 to May 10; on account of reconstruction of Wor- 
cester Street in Southborough by the Department of Public Works water 
was maintained below high water in Sudbury Reservoir while several 
highway culverts were being extended, and from January 1 to 26 units 
Nos. 1 and 2 at the Sudbury power station could not be operated. 

The value of the energy delivered in 1931 at contract prices is $58,- 
465.74 and deducting $56,849.61, the expenditures charged to the opera- 
tion of both stations and the Water Division transmission line, there 
was a profit of $1,616.13. 

Wachusett Station 

The easterly portion of the 66,000-volt transmission line connecting 
the Wachusett and Sudbury power stations was reconditioned for a 
distance of 7.67 miles. In connection with this work 15 new wooden 
poles were set, 14 of the original wooden poles were equipped with con- 
crete pole mounts, the butts of 175 old wooden poles were chipped and 
treated with preservative, and 8 steel towers were scraped and painted. 

The power station was operated on 244 working days during the year, 
and was not operated from February 13 to 28 and from March 14 to 
May 11 on account of the low water in the reservoir, or on Sundays 
and holidays. The statistics are as follows: 

Total energy developed (kilowatt hours) . 5,973,600 

Energy used at power station (kilowatt hours) 31,520 



Available energy (kilowatt hours) .... 5,942,080 

Water used (gallons) 33,902,100,000 

Average head (feet) ...... 78.0 

Energy developed per million foot gallons (kilowatt hours) 2.259 

Efficiency of station (per cent) ..... 71.9 



30 P.D. 48 

Credits : 

Energy sold New England Power Company 
and Edison Electric Illuminating Com- 
pany: 5,753,927 kilowatt hours at $0.00625 $35,962.04 
Deduction of 2 per cent as provided in 

115,079 kilowatt hours at $0.00625 . 719.24 

Energy furnished Clinton Sewerage Pumping 
Station : 
188,153 kilowatt hours at $0.00625 . 1,175.96 

$36,418.76 



Charges : 

Superintendence .... $1,648.12 

Labor, operating station .... 10,109.00 

Repairs and supplies ..... 1,781.91 

Transmission line repairs and supplies . 139.17 

13,678.20 

Taxes 3,750.00 

Administration, general supervision, interest 

and sinking fund ..... 13,858.45 



$31,286.65 



Profit .... ... $5,132.11 

Cost of available energy per thousand kilowatt hours $5,265 

Sudbury Station 

The Sudbury power station was operated on 352 days during the year; 
on 200 days for 24 hours with three shifts, on 140 days for 16 hours 
with two shifts and on 12 days for 8 hours with one shift. From Janu- 
ary 1 to 26 the Sudbury Reservoir was too low to properly supply the 
Weston Aqueduct through Units Nos. 1 and 2 and during this period 
2,004,400,000 gallons of water was by-passed around the units into the 
aqueduct. 

The statistics are as follows: 

Total energy developed (kilowatt hours) 3,594,110 

Energy used at power station (kilowatt hours) 66,594 



Available energy (kilowatt hours) .... 3,527,516 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3 service : 

Water used (gallons 7,477,300,000 

Average head (feet) ...... 63.87 

Weston Aqueduct service : 

Water used (gallons) 30,201,200,000 

Average head (feet) ....... 37.03 

Energy developed per million foot gallons (kilowatt hours) 2.252 

Efficiency of station (per cent) ..... 71.7 

Credits : 

Energy sold Edison Electric Illuminating Company : 

3,527,516 kilowatt hours at $0.00625 . $22,046.98 



P.D. 48 31 

Charges : 

Superintendence ..... $1,575.52 

Labor, operating station .... 13,908.14 

Repairs and supplies ..... 546.21 



$16,029.87 

Taxes 1,922.00 

Administration, general supervision, interest 

and sinking fund ..... 7,611.09 



$25,562.96 



Loss $3,515.98 

Cost of available energy per thousand kilowatt hours . $7,247 

Distribution Pumping Stations 

At the five distribution pumping stations 31,269 million gallons of 
water was pumped during 1931; this is 2,299 million gallons more than 
was pumped at these stations during the previous year. The water 
pumped at the Chestnut Hill Station included 8,767 million gallons for 
the low service and 16,887 million gallons for the high service, which 
includes 73 million gallons for a portion of the supply of the town of 
Brookline, 51 million gallons for a portion of the supply of the city of 
Newton and 603 million gallons which was repumped at the Hyde Park 
Station for the southern extra high service. At the Spot Pond Station 
4,386 million gallons was pumped for the northern high service and at 
the Arlington Station 627 million gallons was pumped for the northern 
extra high service. By arrangement with the city of Newton 530 million 
gallons of water was repumped from the southern high service from 
November 26, 1930 to November 27, 1931 by the city at its Ward Street 
booster station for use on the high land in Belmont and Watertown 
where satisfactory service cannot be furnished from the Chestnut Hill 
Station, and for this pumping the Commonwealth has paid the city 
$7,239.61. 

The average engine duties at the Water Division stations based on 
plunger displacement and total coal used for all purposes, including 
heating and lighting the stations, are as follows: 

Chestnut Hill Station No. 1, 127,912,796 foot pounds per 100 pounds 
of bituminous coal averaging 14,728 British thermal units per pound. 

Chestnut Hill Station No. 2, 140,388,667 foot pounds per 100 pounds 
of bituminous coal averaging 14,728 British thermal units per pound. 

Spot Pond Station, 105,068,119 foot pounds per 100 pounds of bitu- 
minous coal averaging 14,713 British thermal units per pound. 

Arlington Station, 98,593,814 foot pounds per 100 pounds of bitumin- 
ous coal averaging 14,670 British thermal units per pound. 

Hyde Park Station, 78,555,335 foot pounds per 100 pounds of mixed 
bituminous and anthracite coal averaging 14,120 British thermal units 
per pound. The fires are banked for a portion of each day at this 
station. 

At the beginning of the year there was 2,382 net tons of bituminous 
coal and 20 net tons of anthracite screenings on hand at the pumping 
stations and the amount on hand at the end of the year was 1,363 net 
tons of bituminous coal and 47 net tons of anthracite screenings. 

The roofs of the Pumping Service buildings at Chestnut Hill have 
be;en repaired and the exterior and interior metalwork and woodwork 
have been painted at all stations where necessary. 

Boilers have been regularly inspected and engines and auxiliaries 
have been repaired as necessary to keep them in first class and de- 
pendable condition and considerable old piping has been replaced with 
new as required. 

Iron galleries were erected under the steam mains in the boiler room 
at Chestnut Hill Station No. 1. Old Boilers Nos. 8 and 9 at Spot Pond 



32 P.D. 48 

and Nos. 11 and 12 at Chestnut Hill Station No. 1 were removed and 
new boiler No. 25 was installed at Spot Pond and new boilers Nos. 26 
and 27 were installed at Chestnut Hill Station No. 1. 

Expenditures for this work amounted to $29,769.60. 

In addition to the regular work for all of the pumping stations a 
large amount of miscellaneous work has been done at the Pumping 
Service blacksmith, carpenter and machine shops for the Distribution, 
Sudbury and Wachusett sections. 

Distribution Reservoirs 

The locations, elevations and capacities of the distribution reservoirs of 
the Metropolitan Water Works are shown by the following table: 



Distribution Reservoirs and Locations 



Low Service: 

Spot Pond, Stoneham and Medford 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, Brighton district of Boston 

Weston Reservoir, Weeton . 

Mystic Reservoir, Medford . 
Northern High Service: 

Fe ( lls Reservoir, Stoneham . 

Bear Hill Reservoir, Stoneham 
Northern Extra High Service: 

Arlington Reservoir, steel tank, Arlington 
Southern High Service: 

Fisher Hill Reservoir, Brookline . 

Waban Hill Reservoir, Newton 

Forbes Hill Reservoir, Quincy 

Forbes Hill Standpipe, Quincy 
Southern Extra High Service: 

Bellevue Reservoir, steel tank, West Roxbury district of Boston 



Total 



Elevation of 
High Water i 



163.00 
134.00 
200.00 
157.00 

271.00 
300.00 

442 . 50 

251 . 00 
264.50 
192.00 
251.00 

375.00 



Capacity in 
Gallons 



1,791,700,000 

300,000,000 

200,000,000 

26,200,000 

41,400,000 
2,450,000 

2,000,000 

15,500,000 

13,500,000 

5,100,000 

330,000 

2,500,000 



2,400,680,000 



1 Elevation in feet above Boston City Base. 

Powder Horn Hill Reservoir of the city of Chelsea is used when 
necessary for the northern high service. It has a capacity of 1,000,000 
gallons with high-water line at elevation 196.6 and was in service from 
January 1 to April 13 and December 12 to the end of the year. 

The Mystic and Forbes Hill reservoirs have been kept full of water 
for an emergency but were not used during the year. 

The Lawrence basin of the Chestnut Hill Reservoir was out of service 
from January 1 to February 7 and from November 12 to the end of 
the year. 

All other distribution reservoirs were in regular service throughout 
the year. 

Under Contract No. 47-M the Beacon Equipment Company furnished 
and erected 5,749 linear feet of iron picket fence for enclosing the 
Lawrence basin of the Chestnut Hill Reservoir at a cost of $10,894.36. 

The Parks Division was paid $6,265.52 for police service at Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir and at Spot Pond, Fells and Bear Hill reservoirs. 



Distribution Pipe Lines 

The 12-inch northern high service main in Atlantic Avenue, Revere, 
was relaid for a distance of 650 feet where the street had been con- 
structed over a salt marsh and a number of leaks had resulted from 
abnormal corrosion of the water pipe. 

In connection with the widening and rebuilding of the Morton Street 
bridge over the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad in Dor- 
chester, electric-welded steel pipes,. 30 inches in diameter, were laid 
oyer the railroad on the new bridge to replace the old 36-inch southern 
high service cast-iron main under the railroad, which was abandoned. 



P.D. 48 33 

In connection with the construction of a new concrete culvert for 
Stony Brook under Hyde Park Avenue, West Roxbury, the 24-inch 
southern high service pipe line was relocated for a distance of 93 feet. 

In connection with the rebuilding of the Adams Street bridge, over 
the Neponset River at Milton Lower Mills, new steel beams were in- 
stalled to support the two 24-inch southern high service mains, which 
are enclosed in wooden boxes to insulate them from cold weather. 

On December 3 a break occurred in the 24-inch northern high service 
main in Washington Avenue in Chelsea, which did not cause any seri- 
ous damage and was repaired at a cost of $382.38. 

During the year 33 leaks occurred in the distribution mains which 
were repaired at a cost of $2,815.23. 

There are 87 Venturi meters, varying in size from 6 to 60 inches in 
diameter, in the distribution pipe lines; 72 of these are on connections 
supplying various towns in the Metropolitan Water District; 5 are on 
the Weston Aqueduct supply mains; 1 between the southern high ser- 
vice and the southern low service mains ; 3 at the Arlington, Hyde Park and 
Spot Pond pumping stations ; 1 at the city of Newton booster pumping sta- 
tion on Waban Hill ; 2 on connections between the Weston Aqueduct supply 
mains and the local pipes in Washington Street, Newton ; 1 on connection 
to the Fernald School in Waltham, and 2 on emergency connections with 
Cambridge and Wakefield distribution pipes. There are also 9 disc and 16 
detector meters in use for measuring small quantities of water supplied 
at various places. 

There are 6 pressure regulating valves in constant use for reducing 
pressure of water supplied to Revere, Swampscott and Winthrop, and 
the higher portions of Belmont, East Boston and Hyde Park. 

Recording pressure gages have been maintained at 28 places on the 
distribution system and tables in the Appendix show the hydraulic 
grade at 16 of these stations as determined by the charts. 

Pipes, specials and other materials and supplies required for main- 
taining and operating the pipes lines are kept on hand at the Glenwood 
pipe yard in Medford and Chestnut Hill pipe yard in Brighton. 

Auto trucks equipped with gate-operating attachments have been 
maintained with men on duty ready to operate them in case of emerg- 
ency at any time during the day or night. 

Consumption of Water 

During the year 49,193,818,000 gallons of water was furnished from 
the Metropolitan Water Works to the 18 cities and town regularly sup- 
plied. This is equivalent to an average daily consumption of 134,777,- 
600 gallons, and for the estimated population of 1,405,890 is at the rate 
of 95.8 gallons per capita. 

The town of Brookline, with an estimated population of 48,980, used 
from its local source 1,769,372,000 gallons of water, of which 347,390,- 
000 gallons was supplied from elevation 375 and 1,421,982,000 gallons 
was supplied from elevation 250. In addition to this consumption the 
town was supplied with some water from the Metropolitan Water 
Works every month in the year except June. The total quantity supplied 
from the Metropolitan Water Works is estimated as 73,283,000 gallons, 
making the total average daily consumption of the town 4,847,600 
gallons, equivalent to 99 gallons per capita. 

The city of Newton, with an estimated population of 67,710, was 
supplied from its local sources, with the exception of 50,613,000 gal- 
lons, which was furnished from the Metropolitan supply. Including 
this water, the average daily consumption was 4,948,300, equivalent to 
73 gallons per capita. The amount of water furnished the city of New- 
ton from the Metropolitan supply is 37,113,000 gallons in excess of the 
quantity which the city is entitled to take free of charge under the 



84 P.D. 48 

agreement made in 1900 when the Waban Hill Reservoir was purchased 
from the city, and for this water the city will pay $3,516.46. 

The population, consumption of water and per cent of services 
metered in the Metropolitan Water District as supplied in 1931 and for 
the period from 1890 to 1931, inclusive, are shown graphically by the 
accompanying diagram. 

The average daily consumption of water in each of the municipalities 
in the Metropolitan Water District during 1930 and 1931 is as follows: 











Estimated 




Average ! 


Daily Consumption 


















Popula- 
tion, 1931 


1930 


1931 


Decrease 




Gallons 


Gallons 


Gallons 


Gallons 


m 
Gallons 








per Capita 




per Capita 




Arlington . 


38,520 


1,982,100 


54 


1,997,900 


52 


15,8001 


Belmont 








23,150 


1,308,500 


59 


1,323,300 


57 


14,800i 


Boston 








782,020 


92,286,000 


118 


89,753,100 


115 


2,532,900 


Chelsea 








46,390 


3,569,400 


78 


3,580,400 


77 


11,0001 


Everett 








49,790 


4,966,500 


102 


4,900,300 


98 


66,200 


Lexington 








9,840 


630,100 


66 


647,800 


66 


17,7001 


Maiden 








59,680 


3,645,600 


62 


3,882,700 


65 


237,1001 


Medford 








62,460 


3,356,900 


56 


3,341,100 


53 


15,800 


Melrose 








23,860 


1,628,900 


70 


1,659,000 


70 


30,1001 


Milton 








17,290 


868,700 


52 


902,800 


52 


34,100i 


Nahant 








1,670 


197,000 


119 


205,000 


123 


8,0001 


Quincy 








74,600 


5,498,700 


76 


5,263,800 


71 


234,900 


Revere 








36,640 


2,225,200 


62 


2,284,300 


62 


59,1001 


Somerville 






105,320 


9,376,200 


90 


10,135,500 


96 


759,3001 


Stoneham . 






10,250 


690,400 


68 


686,600 


67 


3,800 


Swampscott 






10,640 


811,300 


78 


799,300 


75 


12,000 


Watertown 






36,700 


2,168,100 


61 


2,168,100 


59 


- 


Winthrop . 






17,070 


1,206,900 


71 


1,246,600 


73 


39,700" 


District supplied 


1,405,890 


136,416,500 


98 


134,777,600 


96 


1,638,900 


Brookline . 




48,980 


4,697,700 


98 


4,847,600 


99 


149,9001 


Newton 




67,710 


4,998,100 


76 


4,948,300 


73 


49,800 


Total ] 


Distrii 


;t 




1,522,580 


146,112,300 


97 


144,573,500 


95 


1,538,800 



i Increase. 



The consumption by districts in 1931 as compared with 1930 is as follows 





Gallons 

per Day 

1931 


Decrease from 1930 




Gallons 
per Day 


Percent- 
age 


Low service district, embracing the low-service districts of Arling- 
ton, Belmont, Boston, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Medford, Som- 
erville and Watertown ........ 

Southern high-service district, embracing Quincy, the high-service 
district of Boston, except East Boston, and portions of Milton 
and Watertown ......... 

Southern intermediate high-service district, embracing portions of 
Belmont and Watertown . .... 

Northern high-service district, embracing Melrose, Nahant, Revere, 
Stoneham, Swampscott, and Winthrop and the high-service dis- 
tricts of Chelsea, East Boston, Everett, Maiden, Medford and 
Somerville .......... 

Southern extra high-service district, embracing the higher portions 
of Hyde Park, Milton and West Roxbury 

Northern extra high-service district, embracing Lexington and the 
higher portions of Arlington and Belmont .... 


71,517,500 

45,538,200 
1,433,600 

12,871,400 
1,678,500 
1,738,400 


834,500 

1,403,700 
2,000 1 

363,8001 

211,1001 

22,4001 


1.15 

2.99 
0.141 

2.911 

14.391 

1.311 




134,777,600 
9,795,900 


1,638,900 
100,1001 


1.20 
1.031 




144,573,500 


1,538,800 


1.05 



i Increase. 



POPULATION, CONSUMPTION OF WATER and per CENT OF SERVICES 

in the: 

METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT 
AS SUPPLIED IN 1931 

FROM 1890 TO 1931 



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Note: Estimated population and consumption per capita given on diagrams published in previous annual reports 
time to time as regular census figures become available. 



are revised from 



P.D. 48 35 

Water from Metropolitan Water Works Sources used Outside of 

the Metropolitan Water District 







Average 






Total 


Quantity 


Amount 


Places where Water is Used 


Quantity 
(Gallons) 


(Gallons 
per Day) 


Charged 


Town of Rutland ... 


83,200,0001 


227,950 




Town of Holden 


, . 




24,000,0002 


65,750 


- 


Town of Clinton 


, . 




10,100,000 


27,670 


— 


Westborough State Hospital 


, , 




57,521,000 


157,590 


$1,725.63 


Town of Westborough 


, 




76,000,000 


208,220 


- 


Town of Southborough 


, 




28,615,000 


78,400 


- 


City of Worcester 


, 




73,100,000 


200,270 


- 


Town of Ashland 


. 




61,813,000 


169,350 


— 


Town of Hopkinton 


. 




21,992,000 


60,250 


- 


Town of Framingham 


. 




376,139,000 


1,030,520 


14,495.02 


Town of Natick. .... 


. 




277,140,000 


759,290 


— 


United States Army Reservation at 


Peddock'i 










Island in Hull .... 


, , 




1,138,000 


3,120 


99.663 


Portion of Town of Braintree 


. 




168,0004 


460 


— 


Portion of Town of Winchester 


a 4 




670,0005 


1,840 


- 


Portion of Town of Saugus 


, 




506,0006 


1,390 


- 


Metropolitan Parks, Middlesex Fells 






6,236,000 


17,090 


- 


Walter E. Fernald State School and Metropllitan 








State Hospital . . . 


123,863,000 


339,350 


9,765.43 



Notes. — Water is used throughout the year in all places except the town of Clinton, which took water on 
19 days and the city of Worcester, which took water on 14 days. 
The average daily use is in all cases figured on basis of 365 days. 
1 All but 404,000 gallons diverted from watershed.. 
9 Not diverted from watershed. 

3 Water supplied by the Commission through City of Quincy pipes, and by agreement revenue is divided 
in equal shares between the City and Commonwealth. 

4 The City of Quincy supplies the water and pays the Commonwealth by an addition to its regular 
apportionment. 

5 The Town of Arlington supplies the water and pays the Commonwealth by an addition to its regular 
apportionment. 

6 The City of Melrose supplies the water and pays the Commonwealth by an addition to its regular 
apportionment. 



Information regarding the installation of meters on service pipes by 
the municipalities supplied with water from the Metropolitan Water 
Works for the year 1931 and other statistics are given in tables in the 
Appendix. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Boston, January 2, 1932. 



William E. Foss, 
Director and Chief Engineer. 



36 P.D. 48 

REPORT OF DIRECTOR AND CHIEF ENGINEER 

OF SEWERAGE DIVISION 

Davis B. Keniston, Commissioner, Metropolitan District Commission. 
Dear Sir: — The following report of the operations of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Works for the year ending December 31, 1931, is respectfully 
submitted : 

Organization 

The Director and Chief Engineer has charge of the design and con- 
struction of all new works, and of the maintenance and operation of 
all the works controlled by the Metropolitan District, Commission for 
removing sewage from the thirty-three municipalities which comprise 
the Metropolitan Sewerage Districts. 

The following assistants have been employed during the year: 
Henry T. Stiff, Associate Civil Engineer, in charge of office and draft- 
ing room and of the construction work. 
Ralph W. Loud, Senior Civil Engineer, in charge of survey work and 
field work in connection with the New Neponset Valley Sewer 
construction. 
Charles F. Fitz, Assistant Civil Engineer, in charge of maintenance 
studies and of maintenance construction work on the North Metro- 
politan System. 
Benjamin Rubin, Assistant Civil Engineer, in charge of survey work 
and field work in connection with the Braintree-Weymouth Branch 
Sewer construction. 
Richard S. Everit, Assistant Civil Engineer, in charge of survey work 

and field work in connection with the New Arlington Sewer. 
Arthur F. F. Haskell, Superintendent, North Metropolitan Sewerage 

District. 
Frank B. Williams, Superintendent, South Metropolitan Sewerage Dis- 
trict. 
In addition to the above, the maximum number of engineering and 
other assistants employed during the year was 40, which includes 5 
assistant engineers, 10 instrumentmen, 1 supervising sewer construc- 
tion inspector, 7 inspectors, 1 draftsman, 13 rodmen and engineering 
assistants, 1 chauffeur and 2 stenographers. 



Metropolitan Sewerage Districts 

Areas and Populations 

During the year the town of Weymouth was added to the South 
Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

The populations of the districts, as given in the following table, are 
based on the census of 1930. 



P.D. 48 



37 



Table showing Ultimate Contributing Areas and Present Estimated Populations 
within the Metropolitan Sewerage Districts, as of December 81, 1981. 



City or Town 


Area (Square Miles) 


Estimated Population 




Arlington 


5.20 


39,450 




Belmont . 




4.66 


23,700 




Boston (portions of) 




3.45 


93,700 




Cambridge 




6.11 


114,740 


a 


Chelsea . 




2.24 


46,720 


eg 

+3 


Everett . 




3.34 


50,320 


r— H 

o 


Lexington 1 




5.11 


5,910 


O C3 


Maiden . 




5.07 


60,340 


w w 


Medford 




8.35 


63,520 


0) -+^ ^ 


Melrose . 




3.73 


24,130 


Reading . 




9.82 


10,170 


-►3 


Revere . 




5.86 


37,060 


O 


Somerville 




3.96 


105,910 


fe 


Stoneham 




5.50 


10,320 




Wakefield 




7.65 


16,670 




Winchester 




5.95 


13,090 




Winthrop 




1.61 


17,160 




k Woburn . 




12.71 


19,640 






inn 3° 


75° 550 




r Boston (portions of) 


IUU . OA 

24.96 


1 KJ*J ytJU\J 

377,750 




Braintree 


13.44 


16,600 




Brookline 






6.81 


49,610 




Canton . 






17.84 


5,820 




Dedham x 






9.40 


14,400 


'o 


Milton . 






12.59 


17,630 


etro] 
stric 


Needham 






12.50 


11,410 


Newton . 






16.88 


68,620 


2q 1 


Norwood 






10.16 


15,360 


Quincy . 






12.56 


75,620 


+3 
3 


Stoughton 






16.23 


8,330 


o 


Walpole . 






20.54 


7,540 




Waltham 2 






13.63 


42,180 




Watertown 






4.04 


37,370 




Wellesley 






9.89 


12,140 




Weymouth 






16.46 


21,420 




i 


217.93 


781 800 




" f \^J J. m\-J\J V^ 




Totals 


• 


• 


318.25 


1,534,350 



1 Part of town. 

2 Including 1,650 in the Metropolitan State Hospital and the Middlesex County Tuberculosis Hospital, 
authorized by Chapter 372 of the Acts of 1928 and Chapter 373 of the Acts of 1929. 



Metropolitan Sewers 

Sewers Purchased and Constructed and Their Connections 

During the year there have been 7.291 miles of Metropolitan sewers 
built within the sewerage districts, so that there are now 135.907 miles 
of Metropolitan sewers. Of this total, 9.642 miles of sewers, with the 
Quncy Pumping Station, have been purchased from cities and towns of 
the districts. The remaining 126.265 miles of sewers and other works 
have been constructed by the Metropolitan Boards. 

The locations, lengths and sizes of these sewers are given in the follow- 
ing tables, together with other data referring to the public and special con- 
nections with the systems : 



38 P.D. 48 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections 



Citt or Town 



Boston: 

Deer Island . 

East Boston 



Charlestown 



Winthrop . 



Chelsea 



Everett 



Lexington ' 



Maiden 



Melrose 



Cambridge 



Somerville 



Size of Sewers 



4' 0" to 9' 0" . 
9' 0" to V 0" . 

6' 7" x 7' 5" to 1' 0" 

9'0". 



8' 4" x 9' 2" to 15' 






a 



1.653 

5.467 

3.292 
2.864 

5.230 



8' 2" x 8' 10" to 4' 8" x 5' 1" 



1'3". 



4' 6" x 4' 10" to 1' 0" 



4' 6" x 4' 10" to 10" 



5' 2" x 5' 9" to 1' 3" 



6' 5" x V 2" to 10" 



2.925 



5.8442 



6.099 4 



7.899 



3.577 



86 

a <u 



00 

7? .2 « 



o 



4 
25 

15 

14 

14 



10 



35 



42 



53 



16 



Special Connections 



Character or Location 
of Connection 



Doctor's House 

Shoe factory 

Middlebrook Wool-combing 
Co 

Navy Yard 

Private building 

H. P. Hood & Sons, Inc. . 

Club House .... 

Fire department station . 

Private building 

Bakery .... 

Rendering Works 

Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off .... 

Chelsea Water Works blow- 
offs 

Naval Hospital . . . 

U. S. Lighthouse Service . 

Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off .... 

Cameron Appliance Co. . 

Shultz-Goodwin Co. . 

Andrews-Wasgatt Co. 

National Metallic Bed Co. 

Linoide Co. 

Factory .... 

New England Structural Co. 

Beacon Oil Co. . 

Everett Factories and Terminal 
Corp 



Metropolitan Water Works 

blow-offs . 
Private buildings 
Factory 
Bakery 
Swift & Co. 
Holy Cross Cemetery 
Private buildings 
Factory 

Railroad station 
Park Department bath-house 
Harvard dormitories 
Slaughterhouse 
City Hospital 

Street Railway machine shop 
Private building 
Factory building 
Tannery .... 
Slaughterhouses (3) . 
Carhouse .... 
Somerville Water Works blow 

off . . 
Street railway power house 

Stable 

Rendering works 
Railroad scale pit 
Private building 



a a 

s ® 




5 

2383 



133 5 



1 The Metropolitan Sewer extends but a few feet into the town of Lexington. 

2 Includes 1.84 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Maiden. 

3 Mostly buildings connected with sewers formerly belonging to city of Maiden but later purchased by 
the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission in accordance with Chapter 215 of the Acts of 1898 and by the 
Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board in accordance with Chapter 512 of the Acts of 1911 and made 
parts of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

4 Includes 0.736 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Melrose. 

6 Mostly buildings connected with a sewer formerly belonging to the city of Melrose but later purchased 
by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission in accordance with Chapter 414 of the Acts of 1896 and with 
a sewer extension built in accordance with Chapter 436 of the Acts of 1897 by the Metropolitan Sewerage 
Commission as an outlet for part of the town of Stoneham and made parts of the North Metropolitan 
Sewerage System, 



P.D. 48 39 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Concluded 

Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections — 

Concluded 



City or Town 



Medford 



Winchester 



Stoneham 
Woburn 



Arlington 



Belmont . 
Wakefield 
Revere 
Reading 



Size of Sewers 



6' 0" x 6' 3" to 10" 



4' 6" to 1' 3' 



1' 8" to 10" . 

2' 6" x 2' 7" to 1' 3" 



3' 0" x 3' 6" to 10' 



1' 3" to 2' 6" . 
3' 0" to 2' 0" x 2' 3" 
4' 0" to 15" . 
1' 4" to 3' 0" . 



CO 

01 






a 

CD 

>1 



7.530 



10.420 



2.333 
1.186 



5.846 1 



0.008 
0.703 
0.136 
0.055 



73.0673 



t I 



sag 

a 4> 



.2 5 
3-2 

P4 



to 






27 



34 



64 



5 
1 
3 
1 



376 



Special Connections 



Character or Location 
of Connection 



Divi- 



Armory building 

Private buildings 

Stable . 

Police substation 

Tanneries . 

Private buildings 

Gelatine factory 

Watch-hand factory 

Stable . 

Railroad station 

Felt works . 

Town Hall . 

Bay State Saw & Tool Co 

Whitney Machine Co. 

Metropolitan Sewerage 

sion . 
Water and Sewer Department 

Glue factory 

Private building 

Private buildings 

Railroad station 

Car house . 

Post office . 

Town of Arlington garage 

Town of Arlington workshop 

The Theodore SchwambCo.,Inc 

Arlington Gas Light Co. 

Edison Transformer Station 

Arlington High School 

Laundry .... 



bo 
■~ o 

v OS 

SCO 
-. & 



1 
9 
1 
1 
6 
12 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

4 
1 
2352 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 



733 



1 Includes 2.631 miles of sewer purchased from the town of Arlington. 

2 Mostly buildings connected with a sewer formerly belonging to the town of Arlington but later pur- 
chased by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission in accordance with Chapter 520 of the Acts of 1897 and 
made a part of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

3 Includes 2.787 miles of Mystic Valley Sewer in Medford and Winchester, running parallel with the 
Metropolitan Sewer. 

South Metropolitan Sewerage System 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections 



Citt or Town 



Boston: 
Back Bay 



Brighton 



Size of Sewerg 



A 

a 

h3 



6' 6" to 3' 9" 



7' 0" to 12" 



1 . 500 i 



c ®S 

9 *> 

CD 

■§■3 .a 



6.0352 



17 



16 



Special Connections 



Character or Location 
of Connection 



Bos 



Tufte Medical School 
Private house 
Administration Building, 

ton Park Department . 
Simmons College Buildings 
Art Museum 
Prince District Elementary 

School 
Private building 
Abattoir 
Boston & Albany Railroad yard 



•sg 

i& 



1 

1 

1 
1 

2 

1 
2 
3 
2 



1 Includes 0.355 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

2 Includes 0.446 of a mile of pipe and concrete sewers built for the use of the city of Boston; 
0.026 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 



also 



40 - P.D. 48 

South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Concluded 

Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections 

— Concluded 



City or Town 



Dorchester . 

Hyde Park . 
Roxbury 

West Roxbury 

Brookline . 

Dedham . 

Hull' 
Milton 

Newton 

Quincy 
Waltham . 

Watertown 

Needham . 

Wellesley 5 
Canton 6 . 
Norwood 6 . 
Stoughton 6 
Walpole 6 . 
Braintree 6 
Weymouth 6 



Size of Sewers 



3' x 4' to 2' 6" x 2' 7" . 

10' 7"x 11' 7" to 4' 0" x 4'1" 
6' 6" x 7' to 4' 0" . 

9' 3" x 10' 2" to 12" . 

6' 6" x 7' 0" to 8" . 

4' x 4' 1" to 2' 9" x 3' . 

60" pipe 

11' x 12' to 8" 

4' 2" x 4' 9" to 1' 3" . 

11' 3" x 12' 6" to 16" pipe . 
3' 6" x 4' 0" . 



4' 2" x 4' 9" to 12" 



2' 0" x 2' 3" to 2' 3" x 2' 6" 

2' 0" x 2' 3" 

4' 6" x 5' 0" to 2' 6" pipe '. 

4' 0" x 4' 3" to 2' 6" x 2' 9" 









2.870 1 

4.527 
1.430 

7.643 

2.540 2 

5.012 

0.750 
7.044 

2.911 

7.469 
0.001 



0.7504 

4.921 

5.225 
2.212 



62.840 



§83 

... <n 00 

.2 a u 
75.2 « 



14 



19 



25 { 

14 
9 

31 
11 

26 
1 

8 

l\ 
1 



193 



Special Connections 



Character or Location 
of Connection 



Chocolate works 

Machine shop 

Paper Mill .... 

Private buildings 

Edison Electric Company 

tion 

Mattapan Paper Mills 

Private buildings 

Fairview Cemetery buildings 



Caledonia Grove buildings 
Parental School . 
Lutheran Evangelical Church 
The Whittemore Co. 
Private buildings 
Private buildings 
Private buildings 
Dedham Carpet Mills 



Private buildings 
Private houses . 
Laundry 
Metropolitan Water 

blow-off . 
Squantum schoolhouse 



Sta 



Works 



Private building 
Factories .... 
Stanley Motor Carriage Co. 
Knights of Pythias building 
Walker Gordon Co. . 
Private buildings 



a 9 

— o 

■2 ™ 

§ a 



2 
1 
1 
4 

1 
2 
2 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
6 
2 
2 
1 

4 

16 

1 

1 
1 

2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
6 



80 



1 Includes 1.24 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

2 Includes 0.158 of a mile of pipe sewer built for the use of the town of Brookline. 

3 Hull is not a part of the Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

4 Includes 0.025 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 

5 The Metropolitan Sewer extends but a few feet into the town of Wellesley. 

6 No Metropolitan trunk sewer has been completed to give these towns an outlet. 

Information relating to areas, populations, local sewer connections and 
other data for the Metropolitan sewerage districts appears in the following 

North Metropolitan Sewerage District 



Area 
(Square 


Estimated 

Total 
Population 


Miles of 

Local Sewer 

Connected 


Estimated 

Population 

Contributing 

Sewage 


Ratio of 

Contributing 

Population 

to Total 

Population 

(Per Cent) 


Connections made 

with Metropolitan 

Sewers 


Miles) 


Public 


Special 


100.32 


752,550 


963.88 


700,330 


93.1 


376 


733 



South Metropolitan Sewerage District 



217.93 



318.25 



781,800 



1,534,350 



947 . 68 



563,780 



72.1 



Both Metropolitan Sewerage Districts 



1,911.56 



1,264,110 



82.4 



193 



569 



80 



813 



P.D. 48 41 

Of the estimated gross population of 1,534,350 on December 31, 1931, 
1,264,110 representing 82.4 per cent, were on that date contributing sew- 
age to the Metropolitan sewers, through a total length of 1,911.56 miles 
of local sewers owned by the individual cities and towns of the districts. 

These sewers are connected with the Metropolitan Systems by 569 
public and 813 special connections. During the current year there has 
been an increase of 35.56 miles of local sewers connected with the 
Metropolitan Systems, and 12 public and 9 special connections have 
been added. 

CONSTRUCTION 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System 

Relocation of Old Mystic Valley Sewer 

At the time of the construction of what is known as the Old Mystic 
Valley Sewer by the City of Boston through Winchester, a crossing 
was made over the Aberjona River near Wedgemere Station of the 
Boston and Maine Railroad by means of an iron pipe extending above 
the surface of the river. This was removed some years ago at the re- 
quest of the citizens of Winchester and the sewage was turned at that 
time into the so-called Metropolitan Sewer. In order to make use of 
the Old Mystic Valley Sewer below Wedgemere, a contract was let to 
construct a siphon extending under the Aberjona River at this point 
consisting of 20-inch cast-iron pipe surrounded by concrete. This work 
was let out by contract, some particulars of which are as follows : 

Date of Contract No. 49, (Sewerage Division) June 20, 1931. 

Name of Contractor, George M. Bryne. 

Length of Section, 100 feet. 

Dimensions of siphon, 20-inch pipe. 

Depth of excavation below river surface, 8 feet. 

Engineer in immediate charge of the work, Arthur F. F. Haskell. 

This work was completed and the siphon put in operation August 
25,1931, and the sewage flow above Wedgemere in the Old Mystic Valley 
Sewer was restored to its original route. 

Extension of Mill Brook Valley Sewer in Arlington 

The Legislature, by Chapter 381 of the Acts of 1931, authorized the 
extension of the Metropolitan Sewer in Mill or Sucker Brook Valley 
from a point in Forest Street in Arlington to Park Avenue, Arlington. 
Surveys have been completed and borings made and a contract let for 
the construction of this work known as Section 82, North Metropolitan 
System. Some particulars of this contract are as follows: 

Date of Contract No. 55, (Sewerage Division) December 23, 1931. 

Name of Contractor, N. Cibotti Company. 

Length of Section, 2,126 feet. 

Dimensions of vitrified pipe sewer, 20-inch. 

Depth of excavation, from 4 feet to 17 feet. 

Assistant Engineer in immediate charge of the section, Richard S. 
Everit. 

No work has been done under this contract to date. 

South Metropolitan Sewerage System 

New Neponset Valley Sewer 

Work has been continued during the year in the matter of surveys 
and borings. 

Contracts for the construction of Sections 109 (Part of), 110 (Part 
of), 111, 112, 113, 115 and 116 have been completed during the year 
excepting a small amount of backfilling and other work on Section 109 
(Part of) and Section 110 (Part of). 



42 P.D. 48 

New Neponset Valley Sewer — Section 114 
This section was let in 1930. Work was continued on it during the* 
year excepting for such periods as the Neponset Meadows were flooded 
so as to render work impractical. At the present time there have been 
completed 4,405 feet of sewer. This work will be completed during the 
early part of 1932. 

New Neponset Valley Sewer — Remaining Sections 
Contracts have been let during this year for the construction of 
Sections 117, 118, 119 and 120. 

New Neponset Valley Sewer — Section 117 

Date of Contract No. 46, (Sewerage Division) March 26, 1931. 

Name of Contractor, J. F. Fitzgerald Construction Company. 

Length of Section, 5,735 feet. 

Dimensions of concrete sewer, 4 feet inches by 4 feet 3 inches. 

Depth of excavation, from 6 feet to 27 feet. 

Length of 36-inch cast-iron siphon, 78 feet. 

Assistant Engineer in immediate charge of the section, Seth Peterson. 

At the present time there have been completed 4,881 feet of sewer. 
No unexpected difficulties have arisen. Considerable rock excavation 
was encountered. 

New Neponset Valley Sewer — Section 118 

Date of Contract No. 50, (Sewerage Division) August 6, 1931. 
Name of Contractor, C. & R. Construction Company. 
Length of Section, 4,935 feet. 

Dimensions of concrete sewer, 36 inches by 39 inches and 30 inches 
by 33 inches. 

Depth of excavation, from 5 feet to 32 feet. 

Assistant Engineer in immediate charge of the section, Seth Peterson. 

At the present time there have been completed 2,450 feet of sewer. 

New Neponset Valley Sewer — Section 119 

Date of Contract No. 47, (Sewerage Division) March 26, 1931. 
Name of Contractor, Frank W. Christy. 
Length of Section, 3,580 feet. 

Dimensions of concrete sewer, 24 inches by 27 inches and 33 inches 
by 36 inches. 

Depth of excavation, from 7 feet to 43 feet. 

Assistant Engineer in immediate charge of the section, Seth Peterson. 

At the present time there have been completed 3,093 feet of sewer. 

New Neponset Valley Sewer — Section 120 

Date of Contract No. 54, (Sewerage Division) December 10, 1931. 

Name of Contractor, Anthony Baruffaldi. 

Length of Section, total 3,300 feet. 

Length in tunnel, 600 feet. 

Length in trench, 2,700 feet. 

Dimensions of concrete sewer, 27 inches by 36 inches. 

Depth of excavation in trench, from 5 feet to 22 feet. 

Depth below surface of tunnel, 66 feet. 

Assistant Engineer in immediate charge of the section, Seth Peterson. 

At the present time there have been completed 5 feet of sewer. 

New Neponset Valley Sewer — Section 121 
This section extends from Washington Street in Canton to the 
Stoughton-Canton boundary line. Owing to a study made by the Norfolk 



P.D. 48 43 

County Commissioners and the Town of Canton for the layout of 
a new boulevard in this part of Canton, which would be a convenient 
and economical location for the sewer, there has been some delay in 
the awarding of this contract. This matter has now been practically 
settled and this contract will be awarded early in the coming year. 

Braintree-Weymouth Branch .» 

• 

Surveys and boring studies have been made for the location of this 
trunk line which will extend from a point near the Metropolitan High- 
level Sewer in the vicinity of Palmer Street, Quincy, across private 
lands and across Fore River to Hunt's Point in Weymouth and from 
there through private lands and across Bridge Street in Weymouth to 
a point in Fore River Basin, thence crossing said Basin to a point near 
Idlewell, then extending through the Idlewell District and again cross- 
ing Fore River terminating in Braintree near Audubon Avenue. This 
new extension has been divided into four sections numbered 122, 123, 
124 and 125. This work will also include the construction of a pump- 
ing station near the Metropolitan High-level Sewer in Quincy. 

Section 125 of this branch has been placed under contract, some par- 
ticulars of which are as follows. 

Braintree-Weymouth Branch — Section 125 

Date of Contract No. 52, (Sewerage Division) November 5, 1931. 

Name of Contractor, George M. Bryne. 

Length of Section, 3,620 feet. 

Length of 30-inch cast-iron siphon, 735 feet. 

Length of 42-inch cast-iron siphon, 1,565 feet. 

Length of 48-inch by 51-inch concrete sewer, 1,320 feet. 

Depth of excavation in trench, from 8 feet to 11 feet. 

Depth of exacavation for 30-inch siphon below low water, 22 feet. 

Assistant Engineer in immediate charge of the section, Benjamin 
Rubin. 

But little work has been done under this contract up to the present 
time. 

Squantum Pumping Station — Quincy 

Under the authorization of Chapter 240 of the Acts of 1928, the Com- 
mission has undertaken the construction of a pumping station at New- 
land Street, Squantum. A contract for the sub-structure of this station 
was let, some particulars of which are as follows: 

Date of Contract No. 51, (Sewerage Division) August 24, 1931. 

Name of Contractor, A. D. Daddario. 

Dimensions of Reservoir, 36 feet by 96 feet. 

Depth of excavation, 28 feet. 

Length of 16-inch cast-iron force main, 460 feet. 

Length of concrete sewer, 110 feet. 

Dimensions of concrete sewer, 24 inches by 30 inches. 

Work on this contract is about three-fourths completed. 

Pumping Units for Squantum Pumping Station 

A contract was let for the furnishing of motor driven centrifugal 
pumping units for this station, some particulars of which are as 
follows: 

Date of Contract No. 53, (Sewerage Division) December 10, 1931. 

Name of Contractor, Turbine Equipment Company of New England. 

Two motors, 60 HP capacity each. 

Two centrifugal pumps, suction 10 inches, discharge 8 inches. 

Capacity of units, 4,000,000 gallons per day each with a dynamic lift 
of 46 feet. 

This equipment is now being constructed. 



44 P.D. 48 

Sewage from this station will be discharged into the old Quincy 
24-inch force main which is connected with the City of Boston System at 
Squantum Head and will be discharged through the Moon Island 
Channels. 

MAINTENANCE 

Scope of Work and Force Employed 

The maintenance of the Metropolitan Sewerage System includes the 
operation of 8 pumping stations, the Nut Island screen-house and 
135.907 miles of Metropolitan sewers, receiving the discharge from 
1,911.56 miles of town and city sewers at 1,382 points, together with 
the care and study of inverted siphons under streams and in the harbor. 

At present the permanent maintenance force consists of 188 men, of 
whom 117 are employed on the North System and 71 on the South 
System. These are subdivided as follows: North Metropolitan System, 
74 engineers and other employees in the pumping stations and 43 men, 
including foremen, on maintenance, care of sewer lines, buildings and 
grounds; South Metropolitan System, 46 engineers and other employees 
in the pumping stations and 25 men, including foremen, on mainte- 
nance, care of sewer lines, buildings and grounds. 

The regular work of this department, in addition to the operation of 
the pumping stations, has consisted of routine work of cleaning and 
inspecting sewers and siphons, caring for tide gates, outfall sewers, 
regulators and overflows, measuring flow in sewers, inspection of con- 
nections to the Metropolitan sewers, and the care of pumping stations 
and other buildings, grounds and wharves. 

In addition to these regular duties, other work has been done by the 
maintenance employees in this department as follows: — 

East Boston Pumping Station 

The discharge pipe from the condensers, of engines No. 3 and 4 was 
no longer able to carry away properly the water necessary for con- 
densation. A new cast-iron flanged pipe 12 inches in diameter was laid 
in trenches cut through the foundation walls of the station building 
in order to relieve the situation. This work was done by the main- 
tenance employees. 

On the north chimney of this station, the lightning rod points had 
become so badly corroded that they no longer served their purpose. 
New points were placed in position with some new cable and fasteners. 
The cast-iron cap was removed and scraped and painted and rebedded 
in cement. This work was done by a chimney specialist. 

The six boilers at this station were installed in 1908. The tubes at 
the water line had become very much corroded and began to fail. An 
arrangement was made with the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Company, 
Ltd., to retube one and with the Hodge Boiler Works to retube the 
remainder of these boilers. At the present time this work is over one- 
half completed. 

The two economizers at this station were installed in 1908. They had 
become so weakened by rust that repairs were frequently necessary. 
Experts were asked to give estimated costs of removing these old 
economizers and furnishing and installing new ones. The Green Fuel 
Economizer Company were the low estimators and an arrangement was 
made with them whereby they were to remove the old and furnish and 
install new ones. At the present time this work is about one-half 
completed. 

Deer Island Pumping Station 
During a thunder storm in June, one of the chimneys on the dwelling 
house used in connection with this station was struck by lightning and 
shattered. The slate roof was damaged. A new chimney was built and 
the roof repaired. 






P.D. 48 45 

The 60-inch cast-iron check valve at this station broke in service. 
It was necessary to replace the original seat and hinge with a new 
bronze casting and to install a new disc. 

The dwelling house on Deer Island was painted externally and the 
stockhouse roof was covered with asphalt shingles and the trimmings 
of the building were painted. All the above work was done by the 
maintenance employees. 

The lightning rods on the chimney at this station were examined 
and found to need repairs. These consisted of furnishing and placing 
new points with new fasteners and some new cable ; also the cast-iron 
cap on the chimney was removed, scraped, painted and rebedded 
in cement. Considerable pointing was done on the chimney. This work 
was done by a chimney specialist. 

Harvard College Service Tunnel 

Harvard College Corporation built a tunnel for passage purposes to 
connect the Smith Building with the new Library Building in Cam- 
bridge. This crossed the Metropolitan sewer at Station 6A+7 to Sta- 
tion 6A+25 of Section 30 as relocated. In order not to disturb the 
tunnel, a short section of Metropolitan sewer was built on the north 
side of the existing Metropolitan sewer by and at the expense of 
Harvard College for future use if the Metropolitan sewer should be 
duplicated. 

Railroad Crossing in Cambridge 

The Concord Avenue Realty Company desired to construct a branch 
railroad across the Metropolitan Sewer at about Station 93+30 to Sta- 
tion 93 +50 of Section 43 of the Metropolitan sewer in Cambridge. The 
sewer structure at this point was not strong enough to withstand such 
use and was strengthened by reinforced concrete surrounding the 
sewer structure. This work was done by a contractor at the expense 
of the Realty Company. 

Ward Street Pumping Station 

Boilers Nos. 5 and 6 at this station were installed in 1918. It was 
found necessary to remove the staybolts and install new ones. This 
was done by the International Engineering Works, Incorporated, of 
Framingham, who were the lowest bidders. 

At this station sewage is used for condensing purposes. The dis- 
charge pipes leading from the barometric condensers had become too 
small to successfully fulfill their purpose. A new 16-inch cast-iron 
flanged pipe was extended through the 7-foot-thick foundation wall of 
this building and connected with the discharge from the condensers 
and extended to a point in the suction tube of Pump No. 1 of this 
station. This pipe now is used in addition to the original installation. 
This work was done by the maintenance employees. 

Vertical boilers Nos. 1 and 2 at this station were installed in 1904. 
It was found necessary to replace these. The D. M. Dillon Steam Boiler 
Works of Fitchburg were the lowest bidders on the removal of the old 
boilers and the furnishing and placing of new boilers. These new 
boilers are of the corrugated furnace type thus doing away with stay- 
bolts. These were put in operation November 23, 1931. There are now 
at this station four internally fired vertical boilers of corrugated fur- 
nace type and two similar boilers with staybolt construction. 

Hough's Neck Pumping Station 

At this station two 6-inch Lawrence centrifugal pumps were installed 
in 1910. These had become so badly worn and corroded that repairs 
were no longer practical. These pumps were replaced by two of exactly 



46 P.D. 48 

similar size and type furnished by the Lawrence Pump and Engine 
Company who furnished the original ones. This work was done by the 
maintenance employees. 

Nut Island Screen-house 

In addition to the regular maintenance work at this station and at 
the Hough's Neck Pumping Station, the employees of this station have 
made 4,117 lbs. of brass castings for the different pumping stations of 
the Sewerage Systems. A large amount of expert machine work has 
been done here for other stations. 

Damage by Storm 

A heavy storm caused the tide to destroy about fifty feet of the way 
known as Pawsey Road in Quincy. This road is by agreement under 
the care and upkeep of the Metropolitan District Commission. Repairs 
were made by the maintenance employees. 

Gasolene in Public Sewers 

During the year the usual precautions have been maintained against 
the introduction of gasolene into the Metropolitan sewers. An inspector 
who covers both North and South Metropolitan Sewerage Districts has 
been employed. His duties are to see that all newly constructed ga- 
rages or other gasolene-using establishments are supplied with a proper 
gasolene separator and also to see that these separators are kept in 
working condition. 

During the year 1931 the number of permits issued by the munici- 
palities in the Sewerage Districts for the construction of garages and 
other places where gasolene is used was 290. Each of these permits 
necessitates an examination by our inspector. Many of them are 
attended to through the mails and do not require a personal visit. 
Visits are made, however, to all locations where a connection is to be 
made with the public sewerage system and to such places as do not 
respond to the return postal cards sent out. During the year 28 such 
places were connected with the sewers that empty into the Metro- 
politan Systems. At the present time, there are, according to our 
records, 1,611 garages and other establishments where gasolene is used 
connected with the local sewerage systems which discharge into the 
Metropolitan sewers. 

This system of inspection has improved the gasolene situation in 
regard to the danger to the sewers. Occasionally odors of gasolene are 
detected in the sewers. These are reported to the Public Safety De- 
partment which alone has statutory control of the distribution and 
handling of gasolene in the Commonwealth. 



P.D. 48 



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CM 

co 

CO 


Estimated 
Area Now 
Contribut- 
ing Sewage 


Sq. Miles 
39.63 
43.23 


CO 
CO 

<N 

00 


Estimated 

Present 

Total 

Population 


752,550 

781,800 


1,534,350 


Estimated 
Population 
Now Con- 
tributing 
Sewage 


700,330 
563,780 


o 

I-H 

i-H 

CO 
<N 

i—i 


Estimated 
Number of 

Persons 
Served by 
Each House 
Connection 


CO* 
ION 


CO 


Number 
of Con- 
nections 
with Local 
Sewers 


111,635 
76,429 


•* 

CO 

o 

00 

CO 

1— 1 


9 
a 

■ Ml 

X2 

a 

o 


>- 
o 

$ 

0] 
E 

03 

a 

CO 

72 


Separate and combined 
Separate and combined 


1 
1 

1 


Miles 
of Local 
Sewers 
Con- 
nected 


CCGO 
COCO 

CON. 

CO* 


CO 
■5 

i—i 
i— I 

°i 


oo 

a 
p 

■ 

gg 


North Metropolitan . 
South Metropolitan . 


ja 
o 



50 P.D. 48 

PUMPING STATIONS 

Capacities and Results 

North Metropolitan System 

Deer Island Pumping Station 

At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps with impeller 
wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion engines of the 
Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 100,000,000 gallons, with 19-foot lift. 
Contract capacity of 3 pumps : 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 
Average coal duty for the year: 51,000,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 84,200,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 154,700,000 gallons. 

East Boston Pumping Station 

At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps, with impeller 
wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion engines of the 
Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 100,000,000 gallons with 19-foot lift. 
Contract capacity of 3 pumps : 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 
Average coal duty for the year: 64,500,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 82,200,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 152,700,000 gallons. 

Charlestown Pumping Station 

At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, two of them 
having impeller wheels 7.5 ft in diameter, the other 8.25 feet in 
diameter. They are driven by triple-expansion engines of the Reynolds- 
Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 60,000,000 gallons with 8-foot lift. 
Contract capacity of 2 pumps: 22,000,000 gallons each, with 11-foot lift. 
Average coal duty for the year: 46,500,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 47,200,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 76,000,000 gallons. 

Alewife Brook Pumping Station 

The pumping units in this station consist of one Andrews pump 
driven by a compound marine engine, one Morris pump and Morris 
compound engine and a specially designed engine of vertical cross- 
compound type having between the cylinders a centrifugal pump rotat- 
ing on a horizontal axis. 
Contract capacity of the Andrews pump: 4,500,000 gallons with 13-foot 

lift. 
Contract capacity of Morris pump: 8,000,000 gallons with 15-foot lift. 
Contract capacity of the special pump: 13,000,000 gallons with 13-foot 

lift. 
Average coal duty for the year: 23,400,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 7,070,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 18,950,000 gallons. 

Reading Pumping Station 

At this station are two submerged centrifugal pumps, one of 2,500,000 
gallons per 24 hours, and one of 4,000,000 gallons per 24 hours capac- 
ity. These operate against a maximum head of 65 feet, and are actu- 
ated by vertical shafts directly connected with 75 and 100 horse-power 
motors. Alternating current of 440 volts furnished by the town of 
Reading is used. 

Average quantity pumped per 24 hours: 985,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 2,080,000 gallons. 



P.D. 48 



51 



South Metropolitan System 

Ward Street Pumping Station 
At this station are two vertical, triple-expansion pumping engines, of 
the Allis-Chalmers type, operating reciprocating pumps, the plungers of 
which are 48 inches in diameter with a 60-inch stroke and one 50,000,- 
000-gallon centrifugal pumping unit actuated by a 500 H.P. Uniflow 
engine. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps : 50,000,000 gallons each, with 45-foot lift. 
Average coal duty for the year: 83,300,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 38,600,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 64,000,000 gallons. 

Quincy Punvping Station 

The plant at this station consists of one compound condensing Deane 
duplex piston pumping unit and one Lawrence centrifugal pump driven 
by a Sturtevant compound condensing engine and one Morris centri- 
fugal pump driven by a Morris compound 'condensing engine. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: Morris centrifugal, 10,000,000 gallons; 
Deane, 5,000,000 gallons; Lawrence centrifugal, 10,000,000 gallons. 
Average coal duty for the year: 34,100,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 7,970,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 25,210,000 gallons. 

Nut Island Screen-house 

The plant at this house includes two sets of screens in duplicate actu- 
ated by small reversing engines of the Fitchburg type. Two vertical 
Deane boilers, 80 horse-power each, operate the engines, provide heat 
and light for the house, burn materials intercepted at the screens, and 
furnish power for the Hough's Neck pumping station. 

Average daily quantity of sewage passing screens: 76,300,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity passing screens per day: 220,500,000 gallons. 

Hough's Neck Pumping Station 

At this station are two 6-inch submerged Lawrence centrifugal pumps 
with vertical shafts actuated by two Sturtevant direct-current motors. 

The labor and electric energy for this station are supplied from the 
Nut Island Screen-house, and as used at present it does not materially 
increase the amount of coal used at the latter station. 

Average quantity raised each day: 276,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 581,000 gallons. 

Average Daily Volume of Sewage lifted at Each of the Eight Metropolitan 

Sewerage Pumping Stations during the Year, as compared with the 

Corresponding Volumes for the Previous Year 









Average Daily Ptjmpage 


Pumping Station 


Jan. 1, 1931, 

to Dec. 31, 

1931 


Jan. 1, 1930, 

to Dec. 31, 

1930 


Increase during 
the Year 


Deer Island ..... 
East Boston ..... 
Charlestown ..... 
Alewife Brook .... 
Reading ..... 
Quincy ..... 
Ward Street (actual gallons pumped) 
Hough's Neck . . . . 






Gallons 

84,200,000 

82,200,000 

47,200,000 

7,070,000 

985,000 

7,970,000 

38,600,000 

276,000 


Gallons 

77,100,000 

75,100,000 

41,100,000 

5,480,000 

828,000 1 
5,900,000 
33,500,000 
222,000 


Gallons 
7,100,000 
7,100,000 
6,100,000 
1,590,000 
157,000 
2,070,000 
5,100,000 
54,000 


Per Cent. 
9.21 
9.45 
14.84 
29.01 
18.96 
35.08 
15.22 
24.32 



52 P.D. 48 

Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls 

The Metropolitan Sewerage Districts now have outfalls in Boston 
Harbor at five points, two of which may discharge sewage from the 
North District and three from the South District. 

During the year the sewage of the North District has been dis- 
charged wholly through the outlet located near Deer Island light. The 
other outfall of this system is closed by a cast-iron cover which can 
easily be removed. 

Of the outfalls of the South District two extend for a distance ex- 
ceeding one mile from the shore of Nut Island, Quincy, and the third 
one, called an emergency outlet, extends about 1,500 feet from the same. 
It was necessary to discharge sewage through this outfall 175 hours 
during the year. 

During the year the average flow through the North Metropolitan 
District outfall at Deer Island has been 84,200,000 gallons of sewage 
per 24 hours, with a maximum rate of 154,700,000 gallons during a 
stormy period in June, 1931. The amount of sewage discharged into 
the North Metropolitan District averaged 120 gallons per day for each 
person, taking the estimated population of the District contributing 
sewage. If the sewers in this District were restricted to the admission 
of sewage proper only, this per capita amount would be considerably 
decreased. 

In the South Metropolitan District an average of 76,300,000 gallons 
of sewage per 24 hours has passed through the screens at the Nut 
Island Screen-house and has been discharged from the outfalls into the 
outer harbor. The maximum rate of discharge per day which occurred 
during a stormy period in June, 1931 was 220,500,000 gallons. The dis- 
charge of sewage through these outfalls represents the amount of sew- 
age contributed by the South Metropolitan District, which was at the 
rate of 135 gallons per day per person of the estimated number con- 
tributing sewage in the District. 

The daily discharge of sewage per capita is larger in the South Dis- 
trict than it is in the North District because, owing to the large size 
and unused capacity of the South District High-Level Sewer, more 
storm water is at present admitted to the sewers of this District. 

Material Intercepted at the Screens 

The material removed from the sewage at the screens of the North 
Metropolitan Sewerage Stations, consisting of rags, paper and other 
floating materials, has during the year amounted to 1,958 cubic yards. 
This is equivalent to 1.72 cubic feet for each million gallons of sewage 
pumped at Deer Island. 

The material removed from the sewage at the screens of the South 
Metropolitan Sewerage Stations amounted to 4,713 cubic yards, equal 
to 4.57 cubic feet per million gallons of sewage delivered at the outfall 
works at Nut Island. 

Studies of sewage flows in the Metropolitan sewers and siphons indi- 
cate that they are free from deposit. 

Frederick D. Smith, 

Director and Chief Engineer of Sewerage Division. 
Boston, January 1, 1932. 



P.D. 48 



53 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

of the 
METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION 

For the Year Ending November 30, 1931 







GENERAL 






HEADQUARTERS BUILDING CONSTRUCTION FUND 








$750,000 00 


Expenditures 






Construction: 






Contracts: 






Coleman Bros. .... $111,083 59 






A. B. See Elevator Co. 






31,788 46 






Lord Electric Co. 






15,440 60 






Thomas J. Murphy Co. 






9,053 93 






Acme Heating and Ventilating ( 


?o. 




9,977 10 






Edison Electric Illuminating Co 






1,017 75 






Wellman, Oakes and Higgins 






9,931 00 






Allen Shade Holder Co. . 






1,282 57 






General Fireproofing Corp. 






1,931 06 






E. F. Hauserman Co. 






10,901 30 






T. F. McGann and Sons Co. 






1,603 00 






M. L. McDonald Co. 






2,281 00 






Jarvis Engineering Co. 






792 00 






F. E. Berry, Jr. and Co., Inc. 






523 00 






De Silva Sign Co. . 






174 40 






Lightfoot Schultz Co. 






108 00 






United States Rubber Co. 






73 25 






Andrews Paper Co. . 






32 50 






The Tontine Shade Shoppe 






29 14 


$208,023 65 










Architect services . 






► • • 


9,673 02 




Legal services 






> • • 


16 70 




Miscellaneous 


• 


• • 


739 93 






tL lR itt 30 












512,041 56 








730,494 86 








$19,505 14 



PARKS DIVISION 
Construction 

METROPOLITAN PARKS CONSTRUCTION FUND 

Total amount authorized to Dec. 1, 1930 $9,093,043 96 

Receipts added before June 1, 1901 198,942 81 

$9,291,986 77 
Expenditures 
Amounts charged to Nov. 30, 1931 9,263,603 93 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 ' $28,382 84 

METROPOLITAN PARKS CONSTRUCTION FUND, SERIES II 

Total amount authorized to Dec. 1, 1930 $9,614,780 63 

Receipts from sales, etc. . 29,934 16 

$9,644,714 79 
Expenditures 
Quannapowitt Parkway: 
Construction: 

Contract, Greenough Construction Co. ...... $369 14 

Neponset Bridge: 
Reverted 95 

Street or Way in Brookline: 
Reverted 10.864 45 

$11,234 54 

Amounts charged to Nov. 30, 1930 9,626,143 98 

9,636,378 52 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 $8,336 27 



54 



CHARLES RIVER BASIN CONSTRUCTION FUND 



Total amount authorized to Dec. 1, 1930 
Receipts to Dec. 1, 1930 



Amounts charged to Nov. 30, 1931 
Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



Expenditures 



P.D. 48 



$4,500,000 00 

9,368 91 

$4,509,368 91 

4,472,922 22 

$36,446 69 



NORTHERN TRAFFIC ROUTE CONSTRUCTION FUND 

Total amount authorized to Dec. 1, 1930 . . * . 

Receipts trans, from Northern Traffic Artery Betterment Assessments and Sales Fund 



Land ...... 

Legal services .... 

Abatement of betterment assessments 



Amounts charged to Nov. 30, 1930 
Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



Expenditures 



$15,904 17 
31 97 
93 92 

$16,030 06 
2,926,046 46 



$3,000,000 00 
18,140 30 

$3,018,140 30 



2,942,076 52 
$76,063 78 



NEWTON-WELLESLEY BRIDGE CONSTRUCTION FUND 



Total amount authorized to Dec. 1, 1930 . 

Receipts: 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1931 
For the period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 



Expenditures 



Amounts charged to Nov. 30, 1931 . 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 ......... 

CHARLES RIVER BASIN IMPROVEMENTS 

Chapter 371, Acts of 1929 • . 

Less Chapter 179, Acts of 1931 



Dam to Cottage Farm Bridge: 
Construction: 
Contracts: 

Bay State Dredging and Contracting Co. 

Trimount Dredging Co. . 



Labor and materials 



Engineering: 
Services 
Expenses . 

Legal: 
Services 
Expenses . 

Appraising 
Architect services 
Other services 
Advertising 
Miscellaneous 
Borings 



Nonantum Road Extension: 
Construction: 

Contract, Thomas J. McCue 
Labor and materials 



Engineering: 
Services 
Expenses 

Land 

Legal: 
Services 
Expenses 

Appraising 

Advertising 

Miscellaneous 



Expenditures 



$27,983 17 
2,677 50 

$30,660 67 
96,018 00 



$13,478 44 
372 62 



$158 55 
58 77 



$11,812 40 
616 44 



$3,268 29 
176 50 



$292 56 
24 25 



$126,678 67 



13,851 06 



217 32 

6,075 00 

2,538 94 

262 50 

123 75 

99 50 

1,781 94 



$29 81 
1,703 48 



$12,428 84 



3,444 79 
33,150 00 



316 81 

1,957 50 

62 40 

90 84 



$151,628 68 



$50,000 00 



1,733 29 

$51,733 29 

50,000 00 

$1,733 29 



$2,305,000 00 
25,000 00 

$2,280,000 00 



51,451 18 



P.D. 48 



55 



Charles River Basin Improvements — Concluded 



Underpass: 
Construction: 

Contract, Coleman Bros. 
Labor and materials 

Engineering: 
Services 
Expenses 

Other services 
Advertising . 

Abattoir: 
Engineering: 
Services 
Expenses . 

Legal services 

Appraising 

Miscellaneous 

Mt. Auburn Street: 
Engineering: 
Services 
Expenses . 

General : 
Architect services . 
Advertising . 



Amounts charged to Nov. 30, 1930 . 



$124,015 47 
1,482 29 



$4,828 69 
494 58 



$321 80 
90 



$125,497 76 



5,323 27 

6,449 85 

54 40 



$322 70 
76 60 

2,100 00 
50 00 



$137,325 28 



$411 20 
11 40 


$2,120 26 
67 31 



2,549 30 



422 60 



2,187 57 



$345,564 
55,886 



61 
39 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



$401,451 00 
$1,878,549 00 



Miscellaneous 



METROPOLITAN PARKS EXPENSE FUND 



Receipts, Dec. 1, 1930, to Nov. 30, 1931: 














Bath Houses: 












Revere Beach: 












Sale of tickets .... 


. $19,762 ( 








Privileges ..... 


396 


00 








Miscellaneous .... 


22 


55 


$20,181 15 














Nantasket Beach: 












Sale of tickets .... 


. $22,167 


55 








Privileges ..... 


123 


20 








Steam furnished .... 


4,244 


02 








Miscellaneous .... 


23 


00 


26,557 77 














Nahant Beach: 












Sale of tickets .... 


$7,871 


70 








Privileges ..... 


109 


00 








Miscellaneous .... 


58 


42 


8,039 12 














Magazine Beach: 












Sale of tickets .... 


. 




685 40 






Blue Hills: 












Sale of tickets .... 


$475 r c 








Miscellaneous .... 


3 


00 


478 30 












$55,941 


74 


Rentals: 




Buildings ...... 


. t 




$53,716 66 






Houses ...... 


, t 




1,667 00 






Ducts ...... 


. , 




3,030 68 






Land ...... 


• 




2,567 00 


60,981 


34 


Sales: 






Land ...... 


t m 




$10,570 00 






Wood 


, , 




2,431 02 






Hay and grain ..... 


. . 




382 50 






Old metal, lumber, etc. 


. 




331 93 






Miscellaneous ..... 


• 




419 98 


14,135 


43 


, 




Court fines ...... 


, i 






22,143 


25 


Interest on investments .... 










2,200 


00 


Interest on average daily balance 


, , 








778 


08 


Privileges ...... 


. , 








6,786 


24 


Golf privileges ..... 


, , 








23,736 


80 


Sidewalk and entrance construction 


. 








3,472 


25 


Boat hire ...... 


. 








1,168 


15 


Damage to property .... 










1,109 


33 


Reimbursement for erecting fence 


, , 








2,148 


00 


Reimbursement for construction of drain and resurfacing 








1,367 


30 


Forfeited bids ..... 


, 








613 


00 


Miscellaneous ..... 


• ■ 








597 


18 






$197,178 09 


Receipts, prior to Dec. 1, 1930 


• • 


» 


► • 


3,692,336 06 














— $3,889,514 



15 



56 P.D. 48 

Metropolitan Parks Expense Fund — Continued 

Expenditures, Dec. 1, 1930, to Nov. 30, 1931: 

General Expense: 
Advertising ......... 

Discount on securities ....... 

Miscellaneous . . 

Police: 

Damages to automobile ....... 

Professional services ....... 

Miscellaneous . . 

Blue Hills Reservation: 
Repairs to houses ........ 

Bath house expenses . . . 

Damages to automobile ....... 

Stony Brook Reservation: 
Repairs to houses ........ 

Neponset River Reservation: 

Land $60 00 

Legal: 

Services ....... $14 49 

Expenses ....... 2 62 

17 11 



$100 56 

1,655 50 

20 00 


$1,776 06 

62 23 

193 41 
3 85 


$44 32 

17 00 

91 


$93 61 
82 70 
17 10 


• * 



Blue Hills Parkway: 
Repairs to lamp pole ........ $747 10 

Drainage: 

Construction: 

Contract, John P. Condon Cor- 
poration .... $6,780 34 

Labor and materials . . . 2,470 54 

$9,250 88 



77 11 



Engineering: 

Services ..... 

Expenses ..... 


$392 10 
63 05 


455 15 


9,706 03 

$3,031 04 
12 69 






• 




Furnace Brook Parkway: 
Sidewalk and entrance construction: 
Cost ...... 

Refund ..... 


$2,829 33 
201 71 


10,453 13 


Legal services .... 


• 


9 rfYAQ 79 



West Roxbury Parkway: 
Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Cost • . . . . . . 779 71 

Middlesex Fells Reservation: 
Repairs to houses ...... 

Shrubs ....... 

Damage to automobile .... 

Professional services .... 

Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Refund ...... 

Miscellaneous ..... 



Middlesex Fells Parkway: 
Repairing ditches . 
Appraising .... 
Legal services 
Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Cost ..... 

Refund .... 



Mystic Valley Parkway: 
Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Cost 

Refund . 

Lynn Fells Parkway: 
Legal services . . . . 

Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Cost ...... 

Refund . 



* * 


$574 25 

13 32 
2 50 

14 00 

2 26 
6 40 


$612 43 
231 87 


$ 187 50 
50 00 
26 16 

844 30 




• 


$202 84 
47 41 


$1,133 36 
44 55 


$15 34 
1,177 91 





612 73 



1,107 96 



250 25 



1,193 25 



Middlesex Fells Roads: 
Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Cost 75 02 

Alewife Brook Parkway: 
Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Cost $530 50 



Refund 36 92 



567 42 



P.D. 48 

Metropolitan Parks Expense Fund — Concluded 

Revere Beach Reservation: 

Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Refund $93 20 

Bath house: 

Payrolls $32,213 51 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses . . 10,675 39 



57 



Winthrop Shore Reservation: 
Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Cost 

Refund . 



Revere Beach Parkway: 
Sidewalk and entrance construction: 
Oost ...... 

Refund ..... 

Legal services .... 

Drain: 
Engineering: 

Services ..... 
Expenses .... 

Advertising .... 

Nahant Beach Parkway : 
Advertising ..... 
Repairs to roadside stand 
Bath house: 

Payrolls . . 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses 

Lynnway : 
Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Cost 

Refund ..... 

Charles River Upper Division: 
Damage to automobiles . 
Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Cost ...... 

Refund ..... 

Miscellaneous .... 

Riverside Recreation Grounds: 
Piping 



$566 74 
340 47 



$254 41 
3 70 



Riverside Public Golf Links: 
Miscellaneous supplies and expenses 

Charles River Lower Basin: 
Advertising ..... 
Magazine Beach Bath House: 

Payrolls ..... 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses 

Cambridge Parkway: 
Filling 



Alewife Brook Parkway: 
Sidewalk and entrance construction: 
Cost 



Nantasket Beach Reservation: 
Repairs to buildings 
Bath house: 

Payrolls ..... 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses 

Wellington Bridge: 
Repairs ..... 



Expenditures, prior to Dec. 1, 1930 . 
Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



$258 11 
56 05 



$8,602 10 
1,163 99 



$200 85 
106 56 



$3,375 08 
447 29 



$16,792 06 
4,003 82 



42,888 90 



$142 80 
66 70 



$907 21 
9 41 



314 16 



$96 87 
47 45 



9,766 09 



$73 26 
76 74 



$338 38 



307 41 
4 17 



$46 50 



3,822 37 



$791 22 



20,795 88 



$42,982 10 



209 50 



1,230 78 



9,910 41 



150 00 



649 96 
246 10 

26,194 41 



3,868 87 
22,506 25 

334 61 



21,587 10 
230 50 

$150,296 45 
3,609,033 27 



$3,759,329 72 
$130,184 43 



METROPOLITAN PARKS TRUST FUND 
Receipts: 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1931 

For the period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 ...... 

Expenditures: 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1931 ...... 

For the period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 ...... 



Balance Dec. 1, 1931 



$137 64 
41,342 50 



$38,140 11 



$41,480 14 

38,140 11 
$3,340 03 



58 

EDWIN U: CURTIS MEMORIAL TRUST FUND 
Receipts: 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1931 $7115 

For the period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 1,591 72 



Expenditures: 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1931 
For the period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 



$193 74 
43 85 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



JOHN W. WEEKS BRIDGE TRUST FUND 
Receipts: 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1931 $5 69 

For the period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 235,613 12 



Expenditures: 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1931 
For the period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 



$235,287 90 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



GENERAL REVENUE, BUNKER HILL MONUMENT 
Receipts : 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1931 $3,982 50 

For the period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 39,300 50 



Maintenance 

METROPOLITAN PARKS MAINTENANCE FUND, GENERAL 

Appropriation (Chapter 245, Acts of 1931) ....... 

Balance brought forward from 1930 appropriation to cover 1930 expenditures on 1931 books 



Administration and Engineering: 
Police ...... 

Salaries: 

Commissioners .... 

Secretary, clerks, etc. . 

Chief engineer and assistants 

Rent, care and lighting of building . 
Stationery, office supplies and expenses 
Printing ..... 

Engineering supplies and expenses: 

General ..... 

Auto expenses 

Pensions and annuities . 
Retirement payments 
Deficiency appropriation 

Blue Hills Division: 
Labor and teaming: 

General ..... 
Moth work .... 

Road repairs .... 

Street lighting .... 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses : 

General ..... 

Moth work .... 

Road repairs .... 



Middlesex Fells Division: 
Labor and teaming: 

General .... 
Moth work 
Road repairs 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 
General .... 
Moth work 



Revere Beach Division: 
Labor and teaming: 
General 
Road repairs . 

Street lighting . . . . 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General . . . . . 

Road repairs . 



Expenditures 



$2,500 00 
14,645 62 
30,057 05 



$4,383 69 
1,195 22 



$262,944 94 



47,202 67 

3,549 51 

5,273 53 

200 63 



5,578 91 

27,035 06 

6,399 44 

174 00 



$358,358 69 



$78,360 84 

32,149 38 

1,412 85 



$31,536 47 
2,071 76 
1,028 94 



$60,594 29 

33,578 19 

1,486 16 



$22,368 14 
2,899 30 



$61,278 28 
648 77 



$19,246 70 
1,658 54 



$111,923 07 
3,115 17 



34,637 17 



149,675 41 



$95,658 64 



25,267 44 



120,926 08 



$61,927 05 
12,754 56 



20,905 24 



P.D. 48 



$1,662 87 



237 59 
$1,425 28 



$235,618 81 

235,287 90 
$330 91 



$43,283 00 



$919,774 00 
17.497 08 

$937,271 08 



95,586 85 



P.D. 48 



Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, General — Concluded 



Charles River Upper Division: 
Labor and teaming: 
General 
Moth work 
Road repairs 



aneous expenses: 



Street lighting 

Supplies and miscel 
General 
Moth work 
Road repairs 



Charles River Lower Basin: 
Labor and teaming: 
General 
Moth work 
Road repairs 



Street lighting 
Supplies and miscel 

General 

Road repairs 



aneous expenses: 



Engineering Department: 
Bridge repairs : 
Labor: 

Blue Hills Division . 
Middlesex Fells Division . 
Revere Beach Division 
Charles River Lower Basin 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 
Blue Hills Division . 
Middlesex Fells Division . 
Revere Beach Division 
Charles River Upper Division . 



$51,447 84 

8,374 35 

655 25 



$27,260 39 

14 70 

1,867 24 



$40,452 48 

1,016 50 

274 50 



$15,767 41 
68 12 



$782 10 

2,602 00 

717 80 

86 00 



$41 29 

208 18 

26 82 

4,775 83 



$60,477 44 
9,612 49 



29,142 33 



$41,743 48 
11,773 78 



15,835 53 



$4,187 90 



5,052 12 



$99,232 26 



69,352 79 



9,240 02 



59 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



$902,372 10 
$34,898 98 



METROPOLITAN PARKS MAINTENANCE FUND, SPECIALS 

Band Concerts 



Appropriation (Chapter 245, Acts of 1931) 
(Chapter 460, Acts of 1931) 



Advertising .... 

Bands: 

Blue Hills Division 
Middlesex Fells Division 
Revere Beach Division 
Charles River Upper Division 
Nantasket Beach Division . 
Bunker Hill 



Expenditures 



$72 13 



$4,390 00 
4,156 10 
4,874 00 
6,431 76 
9,821 00 
165 00 



29,837 86 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



Border Roads 
Appropriation (Chapter 405, Acts of 1928. Reappropriated by Chapter 426, Acts of 1930) 
No expenditures .......... 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



Development of Certain Land in Dedham 
Appropriation (Chapter 146, Acts of 1929) ..... 
Expended to Nov. 30, 1931 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



Bathing Facilities on Charles River 
Appropriation (Chapter 426, Acts of 1930) ..... 
Expended to Nov. 30, 1930 



Construction: 

Labor and materials 



Expenditures 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



$20,000 00 
10,000 00 

$30,000 00 



29,909 99 
$90 01 

$10,000 00 

$10,000 00 



$25,000 00 
24,887 31 

$112 69 



$10,000 00 
7,407 41 

$2,592 59 

2,590 65 
$1 94 



60 



Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Specials — Continued 



Brush Cutting, Clearing, Etc. 
Appropriation (Chapter 1, Acts of 1931) ..... 

(Chapter 14, Acts of 1931) 

(Chapter 465, Acts of 1931) .... 



Labor : 

Blue Hills Division 
Middlesex Fells Division 
Revere Beach Division 
Charles River Upper Division 
Charles' River Lower Basin . 
General Expense 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



Expenditures 



Repairing Damages, Shore Walls, Etc. 
Appropriation (Chapter 189, Acts of 1931) ..... 



$58,332 36 

43,423 90 

8,192 00 

42,325 93 

7,536 00 

24 00 



P.D. 48 



8100,000 00 
50,000 00 
80,000 00 

$230,000 00 



159,834 19 
$70,165 81 

$185,000 00 



Construction: 
Contracts: 

M. McDonough Co. . 
M. McDonough Co.. 
Simpson Bros. Corporation 



Labor and materials 



Expenditures 



Engineering: 
Services 
Expenses . 

Architect services 
Other services 
Borings 
Advertising . 



$26,882 86 

9,016 09 

27,817 89 

$63,716 84 
17,876 68 



$5,137 92 
403 30 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 ........ 

Mosquito Control in Reservations 
Appropriation (Chapter 245, Acts of 1931) ..... 



Labor and materials: 
Middlesex Fells Division 
Charles River Upper Division 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



Expenditures 



Stream Gauging 



Appropriation (Chapter 245, Acts of 1931) 



Charles River Upper Division: 
Labor and materials 



Expenditures 



$81,593 52 



5,541 22 

35 88 

839 65 

215 20 

146 95 



$2,519 59 
3,539 95 



Golf Course: 
Construction: 

Contract, C. and R. Construction Co. 
Labor and materials . 



Expenditures 



$30,260 00 
8,252 79 



88,372 42 
$96,627 58 

$10,000 00 



6,059 54 



$3,940 46 
$1,350 00 

1,040 86 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 ......... 


• * 


$309 14 


Police Station, Revere Beach 






Appropriation (Chapter 245, Acts of 1931) ...... 


• 


$40,000 00 


Expenditures 
Construction: 

Contract, Allan A. Gillis Construction Co. ..... 

Engineering services ......... 

Architect services .......... 

Other services .......... 

Advertising ........... 


$9,324 50 

2 45 

697 63 

100 00 

38 00 


10,162 58 




■ • 


Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 . . . . . ... 


$29,837 42 


Golf Course, Blue Hills Reservation 






Appropriation (Chapter 460, Acts of 1931) ...... 


• • 


$80,000 00 



$33,512 79 



P.D. 48 



61 



Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Specials — Concluded 
Golf Course — Concluded 



Engineering: 

Services ..... 
Expenses ..... 

Architect services .... 
Miscellaneous .... 

Locker and Professional Buildings: 
Engineering services 
Other services .... 

Advertising ..... 



$336 18 
18 45 



$354 63 

3,900 00 

7 50 



$2 45 
75 00 
37 05 



$37,774 92 



114 50 





. . . 


• • 




$37,889 42 


Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 


$42,110 58 


Rest Room, 


Blue Hills Reservation 






Appropriation (Chapter 460, Acts of 1931) 


• • ■ 


• • 


* • • 


$5,000 00 


Construction: 

Contract, Carl S. Helrich 
Engineering services .... 
Other services ..... 
Advertising ...... 


Expenditures 

• # • 

• • • 


■ • 


$2,924 00 

7 20 

50 00 

40 09 


3,021 29 




► • • 


Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 


$1,978 71 


METROPOLITAN PARKS MAINTENANCE FUND, BOULEVARDS, GENERAL 


Appropriation (Chapter 245, Acts of 1931) ........ 

Balance brought forward from 1930 appropriation to cover 1930 expenditures on 1931 books 


$608,000 00 
10,466 54 


Administration and Engineering : 
Police ....... 

Salaries: 

Commissioners ..... 

Secretary, clerks, etc. .... 

Chief engineer and assistants 

Rent, care and lighting of building . 
Stationery, office supplies and expenses 
Printing ...... 

Engineering supplies and expenses: 

General ...... 

Auto expenses ..... 


Expenditures. 

• 

$2,500 00 
14,764 07 
31,347 58 

$2,920 90 
1,465 87 


$112,448 52 

48,611 65 

3,553 33 

4,617 07 

200 64 

4,386 77 
998 58 


> 

$174,816 56 
72,006 89 

146,107 92 
97,230 82 


$618,466 54 


Retirement payments .... 


. $42,147 17 

1,804 05 

352 00 




Blue Hills Division: 
Labor and teaming: 

General ...... 

Moth work ..... 

Road repairs ..... 


$44,303 22 
19,621 41 

8,082 26 




Street lighting .... 
Supplies and miscellaneous expenses : 

General ...... 

Road repairs ..... 


$7,378 92 
703 34 






. $76,136 26 
2,060 65 
5,982 89 




Middlesex Fells Division: 
Labor and teaming: 

General ...... 

Moth work ..... 

Road repairs ..... 


$84,179 80 
34,537 95 

27,390 17 




Street lighting .... 
Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General ...... 

Moth work ..... 

Road repairs ..... 


. $24,451 48 

463 49 

2,475 20 






. $51,184 64 

106 53 

1,109 93 

6,124 63 




Revere Beach Division: 
Labor and teaming: 

General ...... 

Moth work ..... 

Road repairs ..... 

Drainage, Revere Beach Parkway. 


$58,525 73 
17,150 09 

21,555 00 




Street lighting ..... 
Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 

Road repairs ..... 

Drainage, Revere Beach Parkway. . 


. $13,732 76 
1,317 50 
6,504 74 






- 





62 



P.D. 48 



Metropolitan Parka Maintenance Fund, Boulevards, General — Concluded 



Charles River Upper Division: 
Labor and teaming: 
General . 
Moth work . 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 
General . 

Charles River Lower Basin: 
Labor and teaming: 
General 
Moth work 
Road repairs 
Traffic lights 

Street lighting . . . . 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 
General . 

Engineering Department: 
Bridge repairs: 

Blue Hills Division 
Middlesex Fells Division 
Revere Beach Division 
Charles River Lower Basin . 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 
Blue Hills Division 
Middlesex Fells Division 
Revere Beach Division 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



$280 00 
2,720 00 



$9,017 09 

280 50 

91 50 

4,292 15 



$3,953 31 

3,444 72 

10,037 14 

389 40 



$262 98 

1,413 22 

12,153 54 



$3,000 00 
236 06 



$13,681 24 
3,216 66 

623 32 



$17,824 57 



13,829 74 



$3,236 06 



17,521 22 



31,654 31 



542,573 78 
$75,892 76 



METROPOLITAN PARKS MAINTENANCE FUND, BOULEVARDS, SPECIALS 



Electric Lighting System 
Balance of Chapters 146 and 386, Acts of 1929 .... 



Installation of conduits, etc. 

Labor and materials 
Engineering: 

Services 

Expenses . 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



Appropriation (Chapter 398, Acts of 1926) 
(Chapter 138, Acts of 1927) 
(Chapter 127, ActB of 1928) 



Expended to Nov. 30, 1930 



Construction: 

Contract, Cronin and Driscoll 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



Expenditures 



$7,270 94 



Expenditures 








. 


• 


$1,935 83 




. 


$61 10 
5 60 


66 70 








2,002 53 




. . 


. 


$5,268 41 


olony Boulevard 








• • • • 


• 


• • 


$250,000 00 
500,000 00 
200,000 00 



$950,000 00 
947,744 58 

$2,255 42 



1,279 19 
$976 23 



Resurfacing Boulevards and Parkways 

Appropriation (Chapter 245, Acts of 1931) ........ 

Balance brought forward from 1930 appropriation to cover 1930 expenditures on 1931 books 



Blue Hills Division: 
Construction: 
Contracts: 

A, DeStefano and Son, Inc. 
M. McDonough Company 
Raimo and Panakio 
A. G. Tomasello and Son . 
University Contracting Co. 



Labor and materials 



Expenditures 



$14,168 45 

13,122 44 

1,818 51 

940 64 

20,667 53 

$50,717 57 
11,143 94 



$300,000 00 
33,776 62 

$333,776 62 



$61,861 51 



P.D. 48 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Boulevards, Specials — Continued 
Blue Hills Division — Concluded 

Engineering: 

Services ....... $7,073 32 

Expenses ....... 458 27 

$7,531 59 

Advertising 201 30 

$69,594 40 

Middlesex Fells Division: 

Construction: 
Contracts: 

M. McDonough Company . . . $24,474 46 

M. McDonough Company . . . 18,669 83 

M. McDonough Company . . . 1,627 12 

$44,771 41 
Labor and materials . ,. . . . 2,397 60 

$47,169 01 

Engineering: 

Services ....... $3,308 63 

Expenses ....... 515 20 

3,823 83 

Advertising ......... 55 20 

51,048 04 

Revere Beach Division: 
Construction: 
Contracts: 

Boston Bridge Works, Inc. . . . $7,912 00 

J. J. Collins 4,483 09 

M. McDonough Company . . . 3,005 38 

$15,400 47 
Labor and materials ..... 1,934 22 

-* $17,334 69 

Engineering: 

Services $588 42 

Expenses ....... 139 37 

727 79 

Advertising ......... 47 65 

18,110 13 

Charles River Upper Division: 

Construction: 

Labor and materials ....... $27,858 36 

Engineering: 

Services ....... $253 76 

Expenses . . . . . . . 1 11 

254 87 

Miscellaneous ........ 80 95 

28,194 18 

Charles River Lower Basin: 

Construction: 
Contracts: 

Coleman Bros. Inc $58,279 39 

John McCourt Company .... 43,570 88 
John McCourt Company .... 4,194 16 

$106,044 43 
Labor and materials ..... 2,217 62 

$108,262 05 

Engineering: 

Services ....... $5,331 09 

Expenses ....... 132 98 

5,464 07 

Advertising . . . . . . . . . 118 05 

113,844 17 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 

Extension of Quinct Shore Reservation 

Appropriation (Chapter 343, Acts of 1927. Reappropriated by Chapter 386, Acts of 1929) 
Expended to Nov. 30, 1930 



63 



$280,790 92 
$52,985 70 



$35,000 00 
19,840 29 

$15,159 71 



Construction: 

Contract, C. M. Callahan, Inc. 
Labor and materials . 



Engineering: 
Services 
Expenses 



Expenditures 



Land 

Legal: 
Services 
Expenses 



$11,926 62 
553 64 



$50 90 
9 40 



$11 04 
2 42 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



$12,480 26 




60 30 
650 00 




13 46 


13,204 02 






$1,955 69 



64 



Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Boulevards, Specials — Continued 

Circumferential Hiohwat 



Appropriation (Chapter 398, Acta of 1926) 
(Chapter 386, Acts of 1929) 
(Chapter 115, Acts of 1930) 
(Chapter 460, Acts of 1931) 



Expended to Nov. 30, 1930 



Lynn Fells Parkway: 
Construction: 

Labor and materials . 
Engineering: 

Services .... 

Expenses .... 

Land ..... 
Legal: 

Services 

Expenses . 

Architect services . 

Credit on account of filling sold 



East Milton Street: 
Construction: 

Contract, Thomas J. McCue 
Engineering: 

Services 

Expenses . 

Land 
Legal: 

Services 

Expenses . 

Other services 
Miscellaneous 



Fellsway East Extension: 
Construction: 

Contract, C. M. Callahan, Inc. 
Labor and materials 



Engineering: 
Services 
Expenses 

Land 

Legal: 
Services 
Expenses 

Appraising 
Advertising 



Walnut Street Extension: 
Engineering services 



Expenditures 



$39 50 
25 


* • 

$42 20 
5 22 



$744 48 



39 75 
3,700 00 



47 42 
12 00 



$4,543 65 
22,506 25 

— $17,962 60 



$105 85 
5 60 


$84 86 
69 59 



$4,377 26 



111 45 
1,009 75 



154 45 

251 00 

5 00 



5,908 91 



$124,386 06 
1,235 71 



$12,754 18 
1,067 03 



$426 93 
44 45 



$125,621 77 



13,821 21 
7,747 00 



471 38 

600 00 

68 75 



148,330 11 
223 00 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 

Land for Boulevard Along Charles River 

Appropriation (Chapter 343, Acts of 1927) ...... 

(Chapter 127, Acts of 1928) 

(Chapter 146, Acts of 1929) . . . . . 



Expended to Nov. 30, 1930 



Engineering services 
Legal services 
Appraising 



Expenditures 



$34 20 
145 43 
300 00 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 ......... 

Land and Filling, Brookline-Newton Boulevard 

Appropriation (Chapter 358, Acts of 1929) ...... 

(Chapter 386, Acts of 1929) 

Expended to Nov. 30, 1930 



P.D. 48 



$115,000 00 

159,000 00 

371,000 00 

28,947 37 

$673,947 37 
411,733 94 

$262,213 43 



136,499 42 
$125,714 01 



$80,000 00 
100,000 00 
200,000 00 

$380,000 00 
328,817 56 

$51,182 44 



479 63 
$50,702 81 



$50,000 00 
25,000 00 

$75,000 00 
49,842 62 



$25,157 38 



P.D. 48 65 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Boulevards, Specials — Continued 

Land and Filling, Brookline-Newton Boulevard — Concluded 

_ .. Expenditures 

Construction: 

Contract, C. & R. Construction Co $2,007 75 

Engineering: 

Services . • . . . . . . • $1,436 98 

Expenses 60 32 

1,496 30 

Land 3,400 00 

Legal : 

Services ......... $33 55 

Expenses 28 20 

61 75 

$6,965 80 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 $18,191 58 

Reconstruction Fellsway, Forest and Main Streets 

Appropriation (Chapter 426, Acts of 1930) $260,000 00 

Expended to Nov. 30, 1930 108,041 82 



_ .. Expenditures 

Construction: 

Contract, C. & R. Construction Co $137,853 57 

Labor and materials ....... 3,813 69 

$141,667 26 

Engineering: 

Services . . . $3,745 49 

Expenses 435 87 

4,181 36 

Architect services .......... 18 00 



$151,958 18 



~ ,. Expenditures 

Construction: 

Contract, M. McDonough Company .... $6,982 11 

Labor and materials . . . . . . . 480 31 

■ $7,462 42 

Engineering: 

Services $376 00 

Expenses ......... 18 30 

394 30 



Services $1,402 99 

Expenses 83 89 






145,866 62 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 $6,091 56 

Traffic Circle at Revere Beach and Middlesex Fells Parkways 

Appropriation (Chapter 426, Acts of 1930) $40,000 00 

Expended to Nov. 30, 1930 19,685 74 



$20,314 26 



7,856 72 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 $12,457 54 

Land, Memorial Drive and Boylston Street 

Appropriation (Chapter 426, Acts of 1930) $20,000 00 

No expenditures ............. - 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 $20,000 00 

Land for Extension, Furnace Brook Parkway 
Appropriation (Chapter 426, Acts of 1930) $90,000 00 

•c Expenditures 

Engineering: 



1,486 88 



Balance transferred to Resurfacing Reedsdale and Brook Roads, Milton, in accord- 
ance with Chapter 460, Acts of 1931 $88,513 12 

Land, Boulevard, Newburyport Turnpike to Lynn Woods Parkway 

Appropriation (Chapter 426, Acts of 1930) $10,000 00 

No expenditures ............. - 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 $10,000 00 

Repairing Damages 
Appropriation (Chapter 189, Acts of 1931) $15,000 00 

Expenditures 
Construction: 

Contract, M. McDonough Company .... $8,733 54 

Labor and materials 5,370 43 

$14,103 97 

Engineering: 

Services $745 81 

Expenses 39 17 

784 98 

Advertising 60 15 

14,949 10 

Balance, Deo. 1, 1931 $50 90 



66 P.D. 48 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Boulevards, Specials — Continued 
Resurfacing Reedsdale and Brook Roads, Milton 
Appropriation (Chapter 460, Acts of 1931 ) $88,513 12 

Expenditures 
Construction: 

Contract, Coleman Bros., Inc. ..... $53,358 55 

Labor and materials ....... 684 88 

$54,043 43 

Engineering: 

Services $2,571 33 

Expenses ......... 139 00 



2,710 33 
Advertising ........... 45 25 



56,799 01 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 $31,714 11 

Brookline-Newton Boulevard 
Appropriation (Chapter 460, Acts of 1931) $231,578 95 

Expenditures 
Engineering: 

Services $800 83 

Expenses ........... 77 17 



878 00 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 $230,700 95 

Reconstruction Alewife Brook Parkway 
Appropriation (Chapter 460, Acts of 1931) $100,000 00 

Expenditures 
Construction: 

Contract, Simpson Bros. Corporation .... $74,730 82 

1,874 61 



Labor and materials 

Engineering: 
Services 
Expenses 

Legal: 
Services 
Expenses 

Appraising 
Advertising 



$5,392 55 
316 99 


$34 57 
3 70 



$76,605 43 



5,709 54 



38 27 
40 00 
61 00 



82,454 24 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 $17,545 76 

Boulevard, Fellsway to Mystic Avenue, Medford 
Appropriation (Chapter 460, Acts of 1931) . . $189,473 68 

Construction: 

Labor and materials .... 
Engineering: 

Services ...... 

Expenses ...... 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 

Woi 

Appropriation (Chapter 460, Acts of 1931) 

Expenditures 
Resurfacing Boulevards and Parkways: 
Construction: 
Contracts: 



Expenditures 






. 


$78 64 




$283 45 
95 


284 40 






363 04 




• • 




• ••*«• 


$189,110 64 


of Previous Years 

• ••••* 




$11,700 00 



M. McDonough Company 
University Excavating Company 


$14 15 
2 42 


$4,630 80 
2,000 00 


$6,632 80 
266 57 




Labor and materials ..... 


$6,630 80 
2 00 




Extension of Quincy Shore Reservation: 
Construction: 

Labor and materials ..... 

Land ........ 

Legal: 

Services ....... 

Expenses ....... 


$175 00 
75 00 

16 57 






• « 






• • « 


6,899 37 




• • 


Balance. Dec. 1, 1931 .... 


$4,800 63 



P.D. 48 



Charles River Basin Maintenance 



Appropriation (Chapter 245, Acts of 1931) ........ 

Balance brought forward from 1930 appropriation to cover 1930 expenditures on 1931 books 



Park and Water Areas: 

Police ..... 

Labor and teaming: 

General ..... 

Moth work .... 

Road repairs .... 

Street lighting .... 
Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 
General ..... 

Locks, Gates and Drawbridges: 
Labor: 

General ..... 
Bridge repairs 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses : 
General ..... 
Bridge repairs 



Retirement payments 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



Expenditures 



$45,069 77 

210 00 

30 25 



$53,840 60 
8,084 06 



$13,212 15 
385 61 



$77,526 74 



45,310 02 
4,784 33 

10,749 44 



$138,370 53 



$61,924 66 



13,597 76 



75,522 42 
925 86 



67 



$216,750 00 
7,242 40 

$223,992 40 



214,818 81 
$9,173 59 



Nantasket Beach Maintenance 

Appropriation (Chapter 245, Acts of 1931) . . 

Balance brought forward from 1930 appropriation to cover 1930 expenditures on 1931 books 



Expenditures 



Police ...... 

Labor and teaming: 

General ..... 
Street lighting . . . . 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General ..... 

Road repairs .... 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



$17,925 23 
136 76 



$30,521 84 

39,564 25 
1,767 62 



18,061 99 



$90,500 00 
627 24 

$91,127 24 



89,915 70 
$1,211 54 



Wellington Bridge Maintenance 

Appropriation (Chapter 245, Acts of 1931) ........ 

Balance brought forward from 1930 appropriation to cover 1930 expenditures on 1931 books 



Labor: 

General ..... 
Bridge repairs .... 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 
General ..... 
Bridge repairs .... 

Retirement payments 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



Expenditures 



$9,078 42 
6,091 59 



$452 18 
5,322 98 



$15,170 01 



5,775 16 
201 03 



$22,000 00 
113 52 

$22,113 52 



21,146 20 
$967 32 



Bunker Hill Maintenance 
Appropriation (Chapter 245, Acts of 1931) .... 



$13,000 00 



Expenditures 



Police ...... 

General labor . . . . 

Flood lighting . 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



$4,247 51 

5,752 08 

271 60 

1,394 69 



11,665 88 
$1,334 12 



68 



P.D. 48 



Appropriation (Chapter 115, Acts of 1930) 
(Chapter 245, Acts of 1931) 



Expended to Nov. 30, 1930 



Architect services . 
Advertising . 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



BUNKER HILL MAINTENANCE. SPECIALS 
Steps and Walks 



Expenditures 



• • 

• • 


$10,000 00 
10.000 00 


> • 


$20,000 00 
9,799 32 


$44 98 
27 95 


$10,200 68 
72 93 






• 


$10,127 75 



Analysis of 1931 Receipts 



Credited to: 

Metropolitan Parks Const. Fund, Series I, Interest Fund 
Metropolitan Parks Const. Fund, Series II, Interest Fund 
Metropolitan Parks Expense Fund .... 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, General 
Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Boulevards 
General Revenue ....... 



$77 75 

77 75 

197,178 09 

11,404 98 

794 05 

3,982 50 



BONDS, SINKING FUND AND NET DEBT 



Metropolitan District Commission Headquarters Building 
Serial Notes issued: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 
Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 

Serial Notes paid: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 
Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 



Serial Notes outstanding Dec. 1, 1931 
Net Debt: . 

Total, Dec. 1, 1931 . 

Total, Dec. 1, 1930 . 

Decrease during 1931 

Parks Division 
Metropolitan Parks Construction, Series I 
Bonds issued: 

Sinking Fund Bonds: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 . 
Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 . 

Serial Bonds and Notes: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 . 
Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 . 



$750,000 00 



$150,000 00 
150,000 00 



$750,000 00 



300,000 00 



$450,000 00 
600,000 00 



$9,485,000 00 



$9,485,000 00 



Sinking Fund Bonds paid: 
Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 
Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 

Serial Bonds and Notes paid: 
Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 
Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 



$1,117,043 96 



$125,000 00 



$257,250 00 
562,543 96 



1,117,043 96 



$125,000 00 



819,793 96 



-$10,602,043 96 



944,793 96 



Bonds outstanding Dec. 1, 1931 ..... 
Sinking Fund: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1931 

Total, Dec. 1, 1930 

Increase during 1931 ...... 

Net Debt: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1931 

Total, Dec. 1, 1930 

Decrease during 1931 ...... 

Metropolitan Parks Construction Fund, Series II 
Bonds issued: 

Sinking Fund Bonds: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 . 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 . . $2,567,500 00 



$7,019,753 47 
6,721,455 67 



$2,637,496 53 
3,193,044 33 



Serial Bonds and Notes: 
Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 
Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 



$2,567,500 00 



$2,383,056 62 



2,383,056 62 



$213,515 12 



$450,000 00 



$150,000 00 



$9,657,250 00 



$298,297 80 



$555,547 80 



$4,950,556 62 



P.D. 48 

Bonds, Sinking Fund and Net Debt — Concluded 
Serial Bonds and Notes paid: 



69 



Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 
Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 



Bonds outstanding Dec. 1, 1931 
Sinking Fund: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1931 . 

Total, Dec. 1, 1930 . 



Increase during 1931 
Net Debt: 

Total, Dec, 1, 1931 . 
Total, Dec. 1, 1930 . 

Decrease during 1931 



Charles River Basin Construction: 
Bonds issued: 

Sinking Fund Bonds: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 
Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 

Serial Bonds: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 
Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 



Serial Bonds paid: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 
Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 



Bonds outstanding Dec. 1, 1931 
Sinking Fund: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1931 . 

Total, Dec. 1, 1930 . 



$105,937 50 
1,001,994 12 



$1,107,931 62 



$1,820,952 34 
1,743,530 53 



$2,021,672 66 
2,205,031 97 



$3,842,625 00 



$77,421 81 



$183,359 31 



$4,125,000 00 



$4,125,000 00 



$375,000 00 



375,000 00 



$4,500,000 00 



Increase during 1931 
Net Debt: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1931 . 
Total, Dec. 1, 1930 . 

Decrease during 1931 



$10,000 00 
182,000 00 



192,000 00 



$2,249,296 64 
2,161,777 25 



$2,058,703 36 
2,156,222 75 



Charles River Bridges Construction: 
Notes issued:* 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 
Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 

Notes paid: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 
Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 



$4,400,000 00 



$4,400,000 00 



$4,308,000 00 



$87,519 39 



$97,519 39 



$4,400 00 00 



$4,400,000 00 



* Including renewals. 



SEWERAGE DIVISION 
Construction 

METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE CONSTRUCTION FUND, NORTH SYSTEM 

Total amount authorized to Dec. 1, 1930 . . . . $8,611,521 55 

Receipts: 



For the year ending Nov. 30, 1931 
For the period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 



Sewer in Arlington and Medford: 
Section 78: 

Engineering expenses . 

Legal services .... 

Appraising .... 

Section 81: 
Construction: 

Labor and materials. 

New Mystic Valley Main Sewer: 
Section 109: 
Construction: 

Labor and materials. 
Engineering expenses . 
Legal: 

Services .... 

Expenses 



$87,514 78 



Expenditures 



$0 78 
38 56 
75 00 



87,514 78 
$8,699,036 33 



$114 34 
1,000 00 



$1,114 34 



$26 98 
2 20 



Easements 



$40 90 
30 



29 18 
2,400 00 



$2,470 38 



70 

Metropolitan Sewerage Construction Fundi, North System — Concluded 

Section 78: 

Engineering expenses .... $0.20 



P.D. 48 



Legal: 
Services . 
Expenses 


laterials. 


• 
• 


$30 68 
1 20 


31 88 

500 00 

1,465 82 


• 


Other services 
Easements 


• • 

$2,193 87 
659 36 


$1,997 90 


Section 82: 
Construction: 
Labor and rn 

Engineering: 
Services . 
Expenses 


$699 98 

2,853 23 
22 80 


Advertising 


• • 


3,576 01 







Amounts charged to Nov. 30, 1930 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



$8,044 29 

$9,158 63 
8,621,340 83 



$8,630,499 46 
$68,536 87 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE CONSTRUCTION FUND, SOUTH SYSTEM 



Total amount authorized to Dec. 1, 1930 . 

Receipts: 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1931 
For the period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 



New Neponset Valley Sewer: 
Section 107: 
Construction: 

Contract, V. Barletta Co. 
Labor and materials. 

Engineering expenses . 

Section 108: 
Construction: 

Contract, Frank W. Christy 

Legal : 

Services .... 
Expenses 

Appraising 
Easements 

Section 109: 
Construction: 

Contract, V. Barletta Co. 
Engineering expenses . 
Legal expenses 
Easements 

Part of Section 109: 
Construction: 

Contract, V. Barletta Co. 
Labor and materials. 

Engineering: 

Services .... 
Expenses 

Legal: 

Services .... 
Expenses 

Easements 

Section 110: 

Engineering expenses . 

Part of Section 110: 
Construction: 

Contract, J. H. Ferguson and 

Co 

Labor and materials. 

Engineering: 

Services .... 
Expenses 



Expenditures 



$16,905 90 
100 00 



$45 60 
6 54 



$17,005 90 
1 06 



$20,166 21 



52 14 

75 00 

1,800 00 



$17,115 48 

60 

9 41 

625 00 



$147,999 39 
669 14 



$5,436 
509 


66 
75 


$44 
3 


20 
12 



$148,668 53 



5,946 41 



47 32 
1,500 00 



$206,906 60 
669 89 



$6,809 58 
771 61 



$207,576 49 



7,581 19 



$13,120,151 75 



$24,599 61 



24,599 61 
$13,144,751 36 



$17,006 96 



22,093 35 



17,750 49 



156,162 26 
$29 71 



P.D. 48 71 

Metropolitan Sewerage Construction Fund, South System — Continued 



Legal: 
Services . 
Expenses 


• • 

• • 

Christy 

• • 


$79 59 
7 84 


$87 43 
3,000 00 

$96,342 73 
3,758 16 




Easements 

Section 111: 
Construction: 

Contract, Frank W. 
Labor and materials 


• • 

$95,426 70 
916 03 


$218,245 11 


Engineering: 
Services . 
Expenses 


$3,455 00 
303 16 


- 






100,100 89 



Section 112: 
Construction: 

Contract, C. and R. Con- 
struction Company . $87,322 18 
Labor and materials. . 988 44 



$88,310 62 



Engineering: 

Services .... 
Expenses 


$2,437 40 

382 78 


2,820 18 




$96,327 28 
783 18 


Section 113: 
Construction: 

Contract, A. Baruffaldi 
Labor and materials . 


$97,110 46 

5,202 91 

77 14 
225 00 


Engineering: 
Services .' 
Expenses 


$4,699 52 
503 39 


Legal : 

Services .... 
Expenses 


$66 22 
10 92 


Easements 





Section 114: 
Construction: 

Contract, V. Barletta Co. $82,913 25 

Labor and materials. . 1,529 64 



Engineering: 

Services .... $5,596 39 

Expenses . . . 872 77 

Legal: 

Services .... $164 00 

Expenses ... 1 60 



$84,442 89 
6,469 16 
165 60 



Easements ..... 50 00 

Appraising 100 00 



Section 115: 
Construction: 

Contract, A. D. Daddario. $102,264 15 
Labor and materials . . 2,060 50 

$104,324 65 
Engineering: 
Services 
Expenses . 

5,193 64 
Legal : 
Services . 
Expenses 

166 51 
Appraising 75 00 



$4,567 
626 


16 

48 


$164 91 
1 60 



Section 116: 
Construction: 

Contract, A. D. Daddario. $77,464 15 

Labor and materials. . 2,497 34 



Engineering: 
Services . 
Expenses 

Legal: 

Services . 
Expenses 

Easements 
Appraising 



$4,034 60 
1,429 69 



$408 41 
22 22 



$79,961 49 
5,464 29 



430 63 

50 00 

150 00 



91,130 80 



102,615 51 



91,227 65 



109,759 80 



86,056 41 



72 

Metropolitan Sewerage Construction Fund, South System — Continued 

Section 117: 
Construction: 

Contract, J. F. Fitzgerald 

Construction Co. . 
Labor and materials 

Engineering: 

Services .... 
Expenses 

Legal: 

Services .... 
Expenses 

Appraising 

Section 118: 
Construction: 

Contract, C. and R. Con- 
struction Co. 
Labor and materials 

Engineering: 

Services .... 
Expenses 



P.D. 48 



$68,153 42 
2,525 73 



$7,263 42 
1,614 61 



$208 37 
25 90 



$70,679 15 



8,878 03 



234 27 
125 00 



$79,916 45 



Legal: 
Services . 
Expenses 



Section 119: 
Construction: 

Contract, Frank W. Christy 
Labor and materials. 



$13,304 62 
490 37 



$6,466 84 
1,175 44 



$181 58 
17 02 



$28,317 41 
1,007 05 



$13,794 99 



7,642 28 



198 60 



$29,324 46 



21,635 87 



Engineering: 
Services . 
Expenses 


* 
• 

t 

t 
• 

• 

rintree 

• 


• • 

• * 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

■ • 

, Weymov 

• • 


$4,668 17 
797 68 


5,465 85 

126 06 
100 00 




Legal: 
Services . 
Expenses 


$111 34 
14 72 




Appraising 


• • 

$2,846 05 
498 58 


35,016 37 


Section 120: 
Engineering: 
Services . 
Expenses 


$3,344 63 
46 45 


Advertising 


• • 

• • 

• • • 

ith and Quincy: 

• • 

• • 


3,391 08 

603 63 

10 42 

i 


Section 121: 
Engineering: 
Services . 
Expenses 


$545 00 
58 63 


Miscellaneous 


$695 00 
404 83 


Sewers in Bn 
Section 122: 
Engineering: 
Services . 
Expenses 


$1,099 83 

1 19S 93 


Section 123: 
Engineering: 
Services . 
Expenses 


$835 00 
290 23 



$1,152,752 76 



Section 124: 
Construction: 

Labor and materials. 
Engineering: 

Services . 

Expenses 



$1,427 26 
302 19 



$700 00 



1,729 45 



2,429 45 



Section 125: • 

Construction: 

Contract, Edward P. Healey $100 00 

Labor and materials. . 600 55 



$700 55 



P.D. 48 



73 



Metropolitan Sewerage Construction Fund, South System — Concluded 
Sewers in Braintree, Weymouth and Quincy — Concluded 
Section 125 — Concluded 

$3,901 67 
578 32 



Engineering: 
Services . 
Expenses 

Legal: 
Services . 
Expenses 

Advertising 



Braintree- Weymouth Pumping Station: 
Engineering expenses . 

Gravity Drainage, City of Quincy: 
Construction: 

Contract, A. D. Daddario 
Labor and materials . 



Engineering: 
Services 

Expenses 

Legal: 
Services 
Expenses 



$8 56 
11 04 



Land damages 
Advertising . 



Amounts charged to Nov. 30, 1930 
Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



$4,479 99 






19 60 
44 50 


$5,244 64 








• 


35 49 


$9,934 64 






$8,682 75 
2,698 58 


$11,381 33 





$730 00 
924 97 



$163 93 
25 30 



1,654 97 



189 23 

1,800 00 

58 15 



15,083 68 

$1,177,771 08 
10,590,231 92 



$11,768,003 00 
$1,376,748 36 



Miscellaneous 

DRAINAGE IN EVERETT, MALDEN AND REVERE 
Authorization (Chapter 456, Acts of 1924) ....... 

Expenditures 



$70,000 00 



Construction: 

Contract, M. McDonough Company 
Labor and materials . . 

Engineering: 

Services ..... 
Expenses ..... 

Legal: 

Services ..... 
Expenses ..... 

Legal notices .... 

Services of apportioning commission . 
Easements ..... 



$6,665 33 
141 70 



$53 40 

8 49 


$162 
31 


56 
28 



$6,807 03 



61 89 



Amounts charged to Nov. 30, 1930 
Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



193 84 






351 75 






3,619 21 






2,600 00 









$13,633 72 




• 


29,409 65 


43,043 37 








$26,956 63 



Maintenance 

METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE MAINTENANCE FUND, NORTH SYSTEM— GENERAL 



Appropriation (Chapter 245, Acts of 1931) ........ 

(Chapter 14, Acts of 1931) 

Balance brought forward from 1930 appropriation to cover 1930 expenditures on 1931 books 

Expenditures 
Administration and Engineering: 
Salaries: 

Commissioners . . $1,250 00 

Secretary and clerks . . 7,024 36 

Chief engineer and assistants 18,200 97 



$375,300 00 

2,000 00 

16,222 71 

$393,522 71 



Rent, care and lighting of building . 
Printing ..... 

Stationery, office supplies and expenses 
Engineering supplies and expenses 

Industrial accident compensation 
Retirement payments 



$26,475 33 
1,458 49 

103 00 
1,795 37 

308 65 



$30,140 84 

635 29 

4,092 09 



$34,868 22 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



74 

Metropolitan Sewerage Maintenance Fund, 

Deer Island Pumping Station: 
Labor ...... 

Fuel 

Oil, waste and packing . 

Water ...... 

Repairs and renewals 

General supplies .... 

Miscellaneous expenses . 

East Boston Pumping Station: 
Labor ...... 

Fuel 

Oil, waste and packing . 

Water ...... 

Repairs and renewals 

General supplies .... 

Miscellaneous expenses . 

Charlestown Pumping Station: 
Labor ...... 

Fuel 

Oil, waste and packing . 

Water . . . . 

Repairs and renewals 

General supplies .... 

Miscellaneous expenses 

Alewife Brook Pumping Station: 
Labor .... 
Fuel .... 
Oil, waste and packing . 
Water .... 
Repairs and renewals 
General supplies 
Miscellaneous expenses . 

Reading Pumping Station 
Labor .... 
Fuel .... 
Repairs and renewals 
General supplies 
Miscellaneous expenses . 

Sewer Lines, Buildings and Grounds: 
Engineering assistants 
Labor ..... 
Deer Island Ferry . 
Automobiles .... 
Brick, cement and lime . 
Castings, ironwork and metal . 
Lumber, paint and oils . 
Machinery, tools and appliances 
Rubber and oiled goods . 
Sand, gravel and stone . 
Repairs .... 

General supplies 
Miscellaneous expenses . 
Relocation of Aberjona Sewer . 

Stables: 
Labor ....... 

Subsistence ...... 

Miscellaneous expenses .... 

Emergency labor (Chapter 14, Acts of 1931) 



P.D. 48 



North System — General — Concluded 



$43,385 

13,152 

817 

1,734 

1,085 

1,090 

211 



89 
57 
53 
54 
21 
27 
45 



$41,543 
19,234 
1,395 
2,186 
3,176 
1,232 
338 



35 
42 
17 
42 
18 
90 
41 



$32,025 15 
7,891 21 
712 07 
560 60 
418 42 
408 76 
54 78 



$17,098 25 

2,799 67 

317 58 

594 30 

44 49 

312 76 

38 27 



$7,253 75 

138 18 

63 49 

2,740 55 

144 07 



$5,820 

80,139 

1,000 

1,012 

515 

558 

1,937 

111 

196 

71 

1,663 

2,357 

3,861 

4,500 



00 
24 
00 
66 
85 
01 
90 
98 
32 
94 
59 
41 
66 
29 



$2,625 00 
298 61 
256 06 



$61,477 46 



69,106 85 



42,070 99 



21,205 32 



10,340 04 



103,746 85 



3,179 67 
2,000 00 



$347,995 40 
$45,527 31 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE MAINTENANCE FUND, SOUTH SYSTEM— GENERAL 



Appropriation (Chapter 245, Acts of 1931) ........ 

(Chapter 14, Acts of 1931) 

Balance brought forward from 1930 appropriation to cover 1930 expenditures on 1931 books 



Administration and Engineering: 
Salaries: 

Commissioners . . $1,250 01 

Secretary and clerks . 7,024 40 

Chief engineer and assistants 3,210 00 

Rent, care and lighting of building 
Printing ...... 

Stationery, office supplies and expenses 
Engineering supplies and expenses . 

Industrial accident compensation 
Retirement payments . 



Expenditures 



$236,100 00 

1,000 00 

10,753 10 

$247,853 10 



$11,484 41 

1,458 41 

555 68 

1,760 16 

251 36 



$15,510 02 

395 43 

3,264 20 



$19,169 65 



P.D. 48 



75 



Metropolitan Sewerage Maintenance Fund, South System — General — Concluded 



Ward Street Pumping Station: 
Labor . 
Fuel 

Oil, waste and packing 
Water . 

Repairs and renewals 
General supplies 
Miscellaneous expenses 

Quincy Pumping Station: 
Labor . 
Fuel 

Oil, waste and packing 
Water . 

Repairs and renewals 
General supplies 
Miscellaneous expenses 



Nut Island Screen House: 
Labor . 
Fuel . 

Oil, waste and packing 
Water . 

Repairs and renewals 
General supplies 
Miscellaneous expenses 



Sewer Lines, Buildings and Grounds: 
Engineering assistants 
Labor ..... 
Automobiles .... 
Brick, cement and lime . 
Castings, ironwork and metal . 
Lumber, paint and oils 
Machinery, tools and appliances 
Rubber and oiled goods . 
Sand, gravel and stone . 
Repairs .... 

General supplies 
Miscellaneous expenses 
Pumping by City of Boston 



Stables: 
Labor ....... 

Subsistence ...... 

Miscellaneous expenses .... 

Emergency labor (Chapter 14, Acts of 1931) 



$52,795 19 
15,408 95 
1,174 90 
2,101 00 
17,385 22 
1,601 36 
1,276 00 



$16,490 30 
4,379 44 
495 70 
399 28 
209 94 
327 84 
80 36 



$16,614 85 
3,079 88 
205 40 
579 17 
2,272 96 
564 78 
112 54 



$5,610 00 

48,302 22 

1,127 75 

234 95 

23 56 

1,252 02 

83 43 

139 09 

399 85 

32 01 

1,179 78 

2,674 23 

11,998 37 



$787 50 

97 35 

149 70 



$91, 742 62 



22,382 86 



23,429 58 



73,057 26 



1,034 55 
1,000 00 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



$231,816 52 
$16,036 58 



Analysis of 1931 Receipts 



Credited to: 

Metropolitan Sewerage Sinking Fund, North System 
Metropolitan Sewerage Maintenance Fund, North System 
Metropolitan Sewerage Maintenance Fund, South System 
Metropolitan Sewerage Interest Fund, South System 



BONDS, SINKING FUNDS AND NET DEBT 



Metropolitan Sewerage Construction, North System 
Bonds issued: 

Sinking Fund Bonds: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 . 
Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 . 



$6,563,000 00 



Serial Bonds: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 
Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 



Sinking Fund Bonds paid: 
Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 
Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 

Serial Bonds paid: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 
Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 



-$6,563,000 00 



$1,725,500 00 



1,725,500 00 



$175 00 

5,713 07 

5,790 96 

151 74 



$8,288,500 00 



$5,795,000 00 



-$5,795,000 00 



$94,500 00 
832,500 00 



927,000 00 



6,722,000 00 



$11,830 77 



Bonds outstanding Dec. 1, 1931 $1,566,500 00 



76 P.D. 48 

Bonds, Sinking Funds and Net Debt — Concluded 

Sinking Fund: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1931 $281,096 68 

Total, Dec. 1, 1930 . 258,610 33 



Increase during 1931 ........... $22,486 35 

f 

Net Debt: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1931 $1,285,403 32 

Total, Dec. 1, 1930 1,402,389 67 



Decrease during 1931 116,986 35 

Metropolitan Sewerage Construction, South System: 
Bonds issued: 
Sinking Fund: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 . 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 . . $8,877,912 00 



-$8,877,912 00 



Serial Bonds: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 . . $1,300,000 00 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 . . 1,625,000 00 



2,925,000 00 
$11,802,912 00 



Sinking Fund Bonds paid: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 . 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 . . $800,000 00 

Serial Bonds paid: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 . . $121,000 00 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 . . 425,000 00 



$800,000 00 



546,000 00 
1,346,000 00 



Bonds outstanding Dec. 1, 1931 . . . $10,456,912 00 

Sinking Fund: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1931 $4,516,349 42 

Total, Dec. 1, 1930 4,080,611 14 



Increase during 1931 . . $435,738 28 

et Debt: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1931 $5,940,562 58 

Total, Dec. 1, 1930 5,197,300 86 



Increase during 1931 . . . . $743,261 72 

WATER DIVISION 
Construction 

METROPOLITAN WATER CONSTRUCTION FUND 

Total amount authorized to Dec. 1, 1930 $47,895,000 00 

Receipts: 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1931 $1,400 08 

For the period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 327,814 92 



Expenditures 
General: 
Chlorination: 

Contract, Wallace and Tiernan Co., Inc. . . . $8,950 00 

Labor and materials ....... 3,691 65 

Southern High Service Lines, Section 52: 
Appraising ..... 

Low Service Lines, Section 51: 

Legal expenses ..... 

Marginal Street, Chelsea: 

Labor ...... 

Supplies and expenses .... 



Less stock transferred to other accounts . 

Less amount of easement transferred to Certain Improvements 



329,215 00 
$48,224,215 00 



• • 


$100 00 


• • 


4 02 


$400 07 
703 84 


1,103 91 




, . 


$13,849 58 
230 47 


provements 


$13,619 11 
7,500 00 



$12,641 65 



6,119 11 



P.D. 48 77 

Metropolitan Water Construction Fund — Continued 

Certain Improvements: 
Meters and Connections: 

Contract, Builders Iron Foundry . . $6,675 00 

Labor 2,403 39 



$9,078 39 
Supplies and expenses .... 1,303 02 



$10,381 41 



Low Service Lines, Section 9: 

Stock 1,282 06 



Southern High Service Lines, Section 52: 

Easements $17,250 00 

Legal services ..... 24 43 



17,274 43 



Less stock transferred to other accounts .... 49,806 53 

—$20,868 63 

Property for Protection of Water Supply: 

Land . . $2,500 00 

Legal: 

Services ...... $65 51 

Expenses ...... 16 22 

81 73 

2,581 73 

Additional Weston Aqueduct Supply Main: 
Section 13: 
Construction: 

Labor and materials. . . . $525 33 



Engineering: 

Services .... $6,876 21 

Expenses . . . 412 99 



7,289 20 



Legal services ..... 42 64 



',857 17 



Section 14: 
Construction: 
Contracts: 

C. and R. ' Construction 

Company . . $185,147 59 

Thomas J. McCue . 14,561 20 



$199,708 79 
Labor and materials. . 7,600 82 



$207,309 61 



Engineering: 

Services . . . 
Expenses 

Legal: 

Services .... 
Expenses 


$16,832 96 
1,405 48 

$40 30 
9 00 


18,238 44 
49 30 






$28,259 77 
923 48 


225,597 35 


Section 15: 
Construction: 

Contract, C. and R. Con- 
struction Company 
Labor and materials. 


$29,183 25 
2,279 33 


Engineering: 

Services .... 
Expenses 


$2,231 68 
47 65 








31,462 58 



Northern High Service Pipe Lines, Section 54: 
Construction: 

Contract, John Williams . $9,718 46 

Labor and materials. . 1,625 32 

Engineering: 

Services .... 
Expenses 



$11,343 78 



2.085 88 

Legal: 

Services . 

Expenses 

78 90 

Appraising . . 10 00 

Easements 1,075 00 



$2,059 


88 


26 


00 


$67 


01 


11 


89 



14,593 56 



78 

Metropolitan Water Construction Fund — Concluded 

Northern High Service Pipe Lines, Section 55: 
Construction: 

Contract, Cenedella and Com- 



pany .... 
Labor and materials . 


$31,329 79 
7,932 70 


$39,262 49 

6,373 13 

103 49 

20 00 

600 00 


Engineering: 

Services .... 
Expenses 


$6,222 00 
151 13 


Legal: 

Services .... 
Expenses 


$95 12 
8 37 


Appraising 
Easements 


?Co. ; 


Stock: 

Contracts: 

Warren Foundry and Pipe Co. 
Chapman Valve Manufacturinj 
Other stock 


$30,583 39 
4,571 35 
1,113 99 



Less stock transferred to other accounts 



Amounts charged to Nov. 30, 1930 



$46,359 11 



36,268 73 

$362,138 50 
51,370 10 



P.D. 48 



$310,768 40 

$298,600 61 
47,802,499 64 



Balance Dec. 1, 1931 



$48,101,100 25 
$123,114 75 



METROPOLITAN WATER MAINTENANCE FUND— GENERAL 

Appropriation (Chapter 245, Acts of 1931) ........ $941,600 00 

Balance brought forward from 1930 appropriation to cover 1930 expenditures on 1931 books 28,924 40 



Expenditures 
Administration and Engineering: 
Salaries: 

Commissioners . . . $2,500 01 

Secretary and clerks . . 14,048 66 

Chief engineer and assistants 28,304 02 



Rent, care and lighting of building . 
Printing ..... 

Stationery, office supplies and expenses 
Engineering supplies and expenses . 

Payments in lieu of taxes 
Industrial accident compensation 
Retirement payments 

Wachusett Department: 
Superintendence .... 

Labor ...... 

Supplies and expenses 

Sudbury Department: 
Superintendence .... 

Labor ...... 

Supplies and expenses 

Distribution Department: 
Superintendence .... 

Labor ...... 

Supplies and expenses 



Credit on account of stock transfer 



Pumping Service: 
Superintendence 
Arlington Pumping Station: 

Labor 

Fuel .... 

Oil, waste and packing 

Repairs 

Supplies 



Chestnut Hill Pumping Station, No. 1 : 
Labor 
Fuel . 

Oil, waste and packing 
Repairs 
Supplies 



$44,852 69 

2,917 07 

206 01 

3,850 93 

6,025 84 



$20,892 68 
3,549 70 

319 21 
1,097 20 

642 34 



$32,171 85 

11,566 93 

901 34 

4,913 18 

2,333 43 



$57,852 54 

59,484 55 

4,268 99 

10,295 53 



$16,017 97 

103,019 53 

17,614 92 



$17,445 04 

135,574 01 

24,778 31 



$16,993 22 

154,240 50 

68,526 30 

$239,760 02 
807 79 



$11,926 33 



26,501 13 



$970,524 40 



$131,901 61 



136,652 42 



177,797 36 



238,952 23 



51,886 73 



P.D. 48 

Metropolitan Water Maintenance Fund — General — Concluded 
Chestnut Hill Pumping Station, No. 2: 



79 



Labor .... 

Fuel 

Oil, waste and packing 

Repairs . . 

Supplies .... 


$53,605 42 

26,034 38 

1,011 62 

3,790 52 

1,875 57 


$86,317 51 

40,262 33 

20,662 37 
13,721 00 
$251,277 40 




Spot Pond Pumping Station: 
Labor .... 

Fuel 

Oil, waste and packing 
Repairs .... 
Supplies .... 


$24,994 84 

12,772 89 

453 20 

801 04 

1,240 36 




Hyde Park Pumping Station: 
Labor .... 

Fuel 

Oil, waste and packing 
Repairs .... 
Supplies .... 


$17,290 58 

2,063 63 

195 46 

439 39 

673 31 




Booster Pumping . 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 


• • • • 


$936,581 02 
$33,943 38 



METROPOLITAN WATER MAINTENANCE FUND— SPECIALS 

Additional Equipment, Pumping Stations 

Appropriation (Chapter 115, Acts of 1930, Item 771) 

Expended to Nov. 30, 1930 



Construction: 

Contract, Keasbey and Mattison Company 
Engineering services .... 



Expenditures 



• • 


$10,000 00 
8,814 86 




$1,185 14 


$490 00 
695 14 


$1,185 14 



Appropriation (Chapter 1, Acts of 1931) 
(Chapter 14, Acts of 1931) 



Clearing Land 



Expenditures 



Emergency labor .... 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 ....... 

Purchase op Boilers 
Appropriation (Chapter 245, Acts of 1931, Item 694) . 

Expenditures 
Construction: 
Contracts: 

International Engineering Works 
F. Pritchard and Son, Inc. 



Labor and materials 

Engineering: 
Services 
Expenses . 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 

Additional Pumping Equipment 
Appropriation (Chapter 245, Acts of 1931, Item 695) 

Expenditures 



Engineering: 
Services 
Expenses 



$3,427 50 
164 03 



Advertising . 



$3,591 53 
26 95 



$10,000 00 
5,000 00 

$15,000 00 

$14,923 71 
$76 29 

$30,000 00 



$18,144 25 
2,408 18 


$24, 491 86 
3,972 14 




$20,552 43 
3,939 43 




$3,907 35 
64 79 






28,464 00 




• • • 


IPMENT 

• • 


$1,536 00 
$50,000 00 



3,618 48 



$46,381 52 



80 

Metropolitan Water Maintenance Fund — Specials — Concluded 
Improvements, Supply Mains, Etc. 
Appropriation (Chapter 245, Acts of 1931, Item 693) ...... 

Expenditures 



P. D. 48 



Section 13: 
Construction: 

Contract, C. and R. Construction Co. 
Labor and materials 

Engineering: 

Services ..... 
Expenses ..... 

Legal services .... 

Section 14: 
Construction: 

Contract, Thomas J. McCue 
Labor and materials 

Engineering: 

Services ..... 
Expenses ..... 

Legal: 

Services ..... 
Expenses ..... 



Stock: 
Contracts: 

Crane Company- 
New England Structural Co. 



Stock transferred from other accounts 
Less stock transferred to other accounts 



$79,526 97 
17,217 00 



$7,630 11 
193 55 



$96,743 97 



7,823 66 
5 00 



$108,404 37 
12,168 85 



$7,941 90 
227 45 



$44 79 
51 60 



$27,727 93 
283 22 

$28,011 15 
93,585 86 



$120,573 22 

8,169 35 

96 39 



$121,597 01 
9,057 80 



$104,572 63 



128,838 96 



112,539 21 



$400,000 00 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1931 



345,950 80 
$54,049 20 



Analysis of 1931 Receipts 



Credited to: 

Metropolitan Water Loan Interest Fund 
Metropolitan Water Construction Fund 
Metropolitan Water Sinking Fund 
Metropolitan Water Maintenance Fund 



$167 75 

1,400 08 

98,341 15 

19,178 98 



$119,087 96 



BONDS, SINKING FUNDS AND NET DEBT 



Metropolitan Water Construction: 
Bonds issued: 
Sinking Fund: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 
Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 

Serial Bonds: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 
Period prior to Dec, 1, 1930 



Serial Bonds paid: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 
Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 



$41,398,000 00 



$41,398,000 00 



$4,287,000 00 



4,287,000 00 



$45,685,000 00 



$118,000 00 
1,082,000 00 



1,200,000 00 



Bonds outstanding Dec. 1, 1931 $44,485,000 00 

Sinking Fund: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1931 $29,935,468 43 

Total, Dec. 1, 1930 28,673,516 38 

Increase during 1931 $1,261,952 05 

Net Debt* 

Total, Dec. 1, 1931 $14,549,531 57 

Total, Dec. 1, 1930 15,929,483 62 



Decrease during 1931 $1,379,952 05 



P. D. 48 81 

Bonds, Sinking Funds and Net Debt — Concluded 

Metropolitan Additional Water Construction: 
Bonds issued: 
Serial Bonds: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 .... $3,000,000 00 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 .... 14,500,000 00 

$17,500,000 00 

Serial Bonds paid: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1931 .... $554,000 00 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1930 .... 615,000 00 

1,169,000 00 



Bonds outstanding Dec. 1, 1931 ■ $16,331,000 00 

Net Debt (under Metropolitan District Water Supply Commission) : 

Total, Dec. 1, 1931 $16,331,000 00 

Total, Dec. 1, 1930 13,885,000 00 



Increase during 1931 $2,446,000 00 

Total Net Debt, Dec. 1, 1931 $30,880,531 57 

Total Net Debt, Dec. 1, 1930 29,814,483 62 



Total increase during 1931 $1,066,047 95 



82 



P. D. 48 



Appendix No. 1 



Contracts Made and Pending During 



Contraot 
Number 



.1501 

15U 

152i 
1533 

1541 

1551 

1561 

1571 

1582 

1593 

1601 

161 
1621 

1631 

1642 
1651 

166 
1671 

1682 

1691 

169A1 

1701 
1711 

172 

173 
174 

175 

176 
177 
178 
179 

180 



WORK 



Construction of an overflow in the Charles River Basin from the 
Boston Marginal Conduit near Fruit Street in the city of Boston. 

Construction of Fellsway East Extension from East Border Road to 
Lynn Fells Parkway. 

Resurfacing roadway on Charles River Dam, Boston and Cambridge. 

Resurfacing South Border Road, Winchester, northerly from near the 
Medford-Winchester line to Mystic Valley Parkway. 

Alterations to steel superstructures of Western Division and Saugus 
Branch Bridges over the Boston and Maine Railroad tracks on the 
Revere Beach Parkway, Medford and Everett. 

Rebuilding sea wall and repairs to shore protection and roadway, 
Ocean Avenue to Underhill Street, Winthrop Shore Reservation, 
Winthrop. 

Alterations in abutments and piers and renewal of floors and pave- 
ment of Western Division and Saugus Branch Bridges, Revere 
Beach Parkway. 

Resurfacing portions of Old Colony Parkway between Columbia 
Road and Quincy Shore Boulevard. 

Building sea wall and repairs to shore protection and roadway, Win- 
throp Parkway, Revere and Winthrop. 

Constructing surface water drain across Revere Beach Parkway, Re- 
vere, near Washburn Avenue Extension. 

Reconstruction of Alewife Brook Parkway, Massachusetts Avenue, 
Cambridge, to Mystic Valley Parkway, Somerville. 

Underpass, Memorial Drive at Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge. 

Widening and resurfacing, portions of Revere Beach Parkway, Med- 
ford and Everett. 

Reconstruction of Chickatawbut Road from west of Randolph Ave- 
nue to near Sassamon Notch Road, Milton. 

Golf course, Redman Farm, Canton. 

Construction of Nonantum Road Extension from Hyde Brook, New- 
ton, to Water Street, Watertown. 

Additions to police station, Revere Beach. 

Resurfacing Memorial Drive from Massachusetts Avenue to Long- 
fellow Bridge. 

Repairs to shore protection at Woodbury's Point near Atlantic Ter- 
race, Lynn, Lynn Shore Reservation. 

Resurfacing Brook Road and Reedsdale Road, Blue Hills Parkway 
to Pleasant Street, Milton. 

Repairing concrete girders on the four northerly spans of Wellington 
Bridge, Somerville and Medford. 

Repairs to shore protection, Winthrop Highlands, Winthrop. 

Resurfacing Adams Street to Quarry Street and Miller Street to Wil- 
lard Street, Quincy, Furnace Brook Parkway. 

Construction of skating shelter "St. Moritz" Blue Hills Reservation, 
Quincy. 

Widening and extension of Boston Embankment. 

Locker building and professional building at Ponkapoag Golf Course, 
Canton. 

Traffic control signals at the Larz Anderson, Western Avenue and 
River Street Bridges, Boston and Cambridge. 

Shore protection, Revere Beach Reservation. 

Grading and steps, northeasterly side of Bunker Hill Monument. 

Relocation of Bold Knob Road, Stony Brook Reservation, Boston. 

Reinforced concrete floor for Revere Beach Parkway bridge over 
Boston, Revere Beach and Lynn Railroad, Revere. 

Steel superstructure, Revere Beach Parkway bridge over Boston, 
Revere Beach and Lynn Railroad, Revere. 



Number 

of 

Bids 



5 

17 

16 
13 



13 

13 
22 
23 
13 



12 
10 

23 

8 
23 



17 

16 

13 

8 



Lowest 



$30,291 75 

152,344 00 

54,619 30 
18,590 00 

7,912 00 
20,730 00 
21,085 02 

15,090 00 

6,634 00 

8,540 00 

85,991 55 



14 
3 


176,071 71 
4,115 30 


8 


22,036 50 


13 
12 


44,500 00 
22,772 00 


9 
15 


27,500 00 
51,446 00 


14 


39,520 00 


14 


59,932 00 


4 


3,625 00 



9,285 00 
20,198 50 

3,650 00 

273,683 35 
17,409 00 

11,350 00 

41,548 00 

10,830 00 

11,749 00 

4,750 00 

4,876 00 



i Contract completed. 
3 Second lowest bidder. 



P. D. 48 



83 



Appendix No. 1 



the Year 1931 — Parks Division 



Contractor 


Date 

of 

Contract 


Date 

of 

Completion 


Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31,1931 


Bay State Dredging and Contracting Co. 


July 16, 1931 


Nov. 21, 1931 


$32,941 23 


C. M. Callahan, Inc. ....... 


Feb. 5, 1931 


Nov. 18, 1931 


154,705 41 


Coleman Bros., Inc. ....... 

M. McDonough Co. ....... 


Mar. 19, 1931 
Mar. 19, 1931 


July 29,1931 
May 23, 1931 


58,279 39 
18,838 74 


BoBton Bridge Works ...... 


Apr. 9, 1931 


July 20,1931 


7,912 00 


M. McDonough Co. ....... 


Apr. 2, 1931 


July 30, 1931 


27,114 06 


J. J. Collins ........ 


Apr. 23,1931 


Aug. 18, 1931 


22,038 49 


M. McDonough Co. ....... 


Apr. 23,1931 


July 15,1931 


13,238 36 


M. McDonough Co. ....... 


May 21, 1931 


Aug. 6, 1931 


8,797 26 


(Philip) Cenedella Co 


May 28, 1931 


Sept. 9,1931 


12,249 26 


Simpson Brothers Corp. ...... 


July 9, 1931 


Nov. 18, 1931 


87,918 61 


Coleman Brothers, Inc. ...... 

M. McDonough Co. ....... 


July 9, 1931 
July 2, 1931 


Aug. 22, 1931 


182,312 81 
3,015 60 


University Contracting Co. . . . / . 


July 23, 1931 


Nov. 5,1931 


24,314 75 


C. & R. Construction Co. ...... 

Thomas Joseph McCue ...... 


Aug. 6, 1931 
Sept. 3,1931 


- 


35,600 00 
23,626 74 


Gillis Construction Company ..... 
John McCourt Co. ....... 


Sept. 24, 1931 
Aug. 20, 1931 


Nov. 28, 1931 


10,970 00 
67,427 56 


Simpson Brothers Corp. ...... 


Sept. 3, 1931 


Dec. 9, 1931 


33,178 48 


Coleman Brothers, Inc. ...... 


Sept. 24, 1931 


Nov. 30, 1931 


67,804 00 


National Gunite Contracting Co. .... 


Sept. 3, 1931 


Sept. 19, 1931 


3,307 95 


M. McDonough Co. ...... 

A. DeStefano & Son, Inc. ...... 


Sept. 17, 1931 
Oct. 8, 1931 


Nov. 5, 1931 
Dec. 12, 1931 


10,607 16 
19,896 49 


Carl S. Helrich 


Oct. 15,1931 


- 


3,440 00 


Trimount Dredging Company ..... 
Corsetti & Arcese Company ..... 


Oct. 29,1931 
Nov. 25, 1931 


— 


22,148 52 
4,479 65 


Automatic Signal Corp. ...... 


Nov. 5, 1931 


- 


7,500 00 


M. McDonough Co. ....... 

M. McDonough Co. ....... 

J. Susi and Brother ....... 

M. McDonough Co. ....... 


Nov. 19, 1931 
Dec. 3, 1931 
Nov. 25, 1931 
Dec. 3, 1931 


- 


12,589 70 
2,250 00 
6,477 45 


Boston Bridge Works ...... 


Dec. 3, 1931 


— 





84 



P. D. 48 



Appendix No. 2 



Contracts Made and Pending During 

(The details of Contracts made before 



1 


2 

WORK 


3 

Num- 
ber of 
BidB 


Amouni 


• or Bid 


6 


Num- 
ber of 
Con- 
tract 


4 

Next to 
Lowest 


5 

Lowest 


Contractor 


76 » 


Laying cast-iron water pipes, 
furnished by the Common- 
wealth, in Revere. 


14 


$35,864 50 


$32,742 002 


Cenedella & Co., Milford, 
Mass. 


78 > 


Furnishing 6 20-inch gate 
valves. 


3 


5,250 00 


4,170 002 


The Chapman Valve Man- 
ufacturing Co., Indian 
Orchard, Mass. 


79i 


Furnishing and laying 60- 
inch electric-welded steel 
water pipes in Boston and 
Newton. 


13 


150,962 502 


145,647 00 


C. and R. Construction 
Co., Boston. 


80 


Furnishing water valves, 24 
12-inch, 16 16-inch, 24 20- 
inch, 6 36-inch screw-lift 
valves and 1 30-inch and 
2 36-inch hydraulic lift 
valves. 


5 


37,253 00 


32,416 00 2 


Crane Co., Chicago, 111. 
(Valve Shop at Bridge- 
port, Conn.) 


81i 


Furnishing and laying 60- 
inch electric-welded steel 
water pipes in Newton. 


7 


97,700 00 


95,145 002 


C. and R. Construction 
Co., Boston. 


82i 


Furnishing Venturi meters. 


-3 


-3 


-3 


Builders Iron Foundry, 
Providence, R. I. 


83 


Furnishing and laying 60- 
inch electric-welded steel 
water pipes in Newton and 
Watertown. 


10 


121,860 00 


121,455 002 


Thomas Joseph McCue, 
Watertown, Mass. 


35-M 


Sale and purchase of electric 
energy to be developed at 
Wachusett Dam in Clin- 
ton. 


_3 


_3 


-3 


New England Power Com- 
pany and Edison Elec- 
tric Illuminating Com- 
pany of Boston. 



1 Contract completed. 

2 Contract based upon this bid. 

3 Competitive bids were not received. 



P. D. 48 



85 



Appendix No. 2 



the Year 1931 — Water Division 

1931 have been given in previous reports.) 



Date of 
Contract 



Aug. 30, 1930 



Oct. 11, 1930 



Feb. 11,1931 



Mar. 2, 1931 



April 30,1931 



April 11, 1931 



June 2, 1931 



Mar. 1, 1929 



8 



Date of 
Completion 
of Contract 



Sept. 23, 1931 



Feb. 3, 1931 



Nov. 23, 1931 



Dec. 8, 1931 



June 30, 1931 



9 



Prices of Principal Items of Contract 



See Annual Report for 1930. 



See Annual Report for 1930. 



For furnishing and laying electric-welded steel pipes, 
$18.00 per lin. ft.; for laying 6-inch, 12-inch, 16- 
inch and 20-inch cast-iron pipes, furnished by the 
Commonwealth, $1.00 per lin. ft.; for earth excava- 
tion $4.00 per cu. yd. ; for chambers for 36-inch gate 
valves $100.00 per chamber; for chambers for blow- 
off, by-pass, connection and air valves and man- 
holes $60.00 per chamber; for concrete masonry 
$8.00 per cu. yd.; for resurfacing bituminous maca- 
dam and granite block pavements $1.40 per sq. yd.; 
for resurfacing sheet asphalt on concrete base pave- 
ment, $4.00 per sq. yd. 

For screw-lift valves,— 12-inch $225, 16-inch $290, 20- 
inch $375, 36-inch $1,400; for hydraulic lift valves, 
—30-inch $1,526, 36-inch $1,725 each. 



For furnishing and laying electric-welded steel pipes, 
$14.40 per lin. ft.; for laying 6-inch, 12-inch, 16- 
inch and 20-inch cast-iron pipes, furnished by the 
Commonwealth, $1.00 per lin. ft.; for rock excava- 
tion $0.50 per cu. yd. ; for chambers for 36-inch gate 
valves, blow-off, by-pass, connection and air valves 
and manholes $60 per chamber; for concrete mason- 
ry, $8 00 per cu. yd. 

For 2 16-inch by 8-inch Standard Venturi meter tubes, 
$450 each; 3 20-inch by 5^-inch Standard Ven- 
turi meter tubes, $675 each; for 6 Special Metropoli- 
tan Type "Y" Register-indicator-recorders, $625 
each. 

For furnishing and laying electric-welded steel pipes, 
$13.70 per lin. ft. ; for laying 12-inch, 16-inch and 20- 
inch cast-iron pipes, furnished by the Common- 
wealth, $1.00 per lin. ft.; for rock excavation above 
grade $1.70 per cu. yd.; for rock excavation below 
grade, $15.00 per cu. yd.; for earth excavation be- 
low grade, $3.00 per cu. yd.; for chambers for 36- 
inch gate valves, $100.00 per chamber; for cham- 
bers for blow-off, by-pass and connection valves, 
$65.00 per chamber; for chambers for air valves 
and manholes, $50.00 per chamber; for concrete 
masonry, $6.00 per cu. yd.; for resurfacing bitum- 
inous macadam pavement, $1.00 per sq. yd.; for 
resurfacing granolithic sidewalks, $2.50 per sq. yd. 

Sale and purchase to include on week days, excepting 
Saturday afternoons and legal holidays, all electric- 
ity generated after deduction of that used by Com- 
mission in connection with operation of its works in 
Wachusett Section. Contract to continue until 
terminated by either party by giving 6 months' no- 
tice, but not earlier than March 1, 1939. 



10 



Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 1981 



$43,271 18 

4,571 35 

205,719 55 



32,621 10 



100,648 99 



6, 675 00 



132,500 00 



126,649 34 



86 



P. D. 48 
Contracts Made and Pending During 



1 


2 

WORK 


3 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids 


Amount 


or Bid 


6 


Num- 
ber of 
Con- 
tract 


4 

Ne^t to 
Lowest 


5 

Lowest 


Contractor 


36-M 


Sale and purchase of electric 
energy to be developed at 
Sudbury Dam in South- 
borough. 


-3 


_3 


-3 


Edison Electric Illumin- 
ating Company of Bos- 
ton. 


46-M 1 


Furnishing v«rtical fire-tube 
boilers at Chestnut Hill 
Pumping Station No. 1 and 
at Spot Pond Pumping 
Station. 


5 


$18,404 00 


$17,949 00 2 


International Engineering 
Works, Inc., Framing- 
ham. 


47-Mi 


Furnishing and erecting fences 
at Chestnut Hill Reservoir 


13 


10,963 40 


10,877 302 


Beacon Equipment Co., 
Brookline. 


48-Mi 


Removing old and erecting 
new boilers at Chestnut 
Hill Pumping Station No. 
1 and at Spot Pond Pump- 
ing Station. 


5 


3,136 00 


2,550 002 


F. Pritchard & Son, Inc., 
Watertown 


49-M* 


Relocating southern high ser- 
vice 36-inch pipe line cross- 
ing N. Y , N. H. & H. R.R. 
at Morton Street Bridge, 
Dorchester. 


-3 


-3 


_3 


Walsh Holyoke Steam 
Boiler Works, Inc., 
Holyoke. 


50-Mi 


Non-heat-conducting cover- 
ing of boilers at Chestnut 
Hill Pumping Station No. 
1 and at Spot Pond Pump- 
ing Station. 


5 


1,714 00 


1,536 002 


Standard Asbestos Cov- 
ering Co., Inc., Boston. 


51-M 


Repairing roofs of Chestnut 
Hill Pumping Stations. 


4 


1,425 00 


1,165 002 


Atlantic Roofing and Sky- 
light Works, Boston. 


52-M 


Rewinding stators and fur- 
nishing and installing new 
field coil washers and 
wedges of generators, Wa- 
chusett Power Station. 


-3 


-3 


-3 


Westinghouse Electric & 
Manufacturing Com- 
pany, Boston. 



1 Contract completed. 

3 Contract based upon this bid. 

8 Competitive bids were not received, 



P. D. 48 

the Year 1931 — Water Division — Continued 



87 



Date of 
Contract 



Mar. 1, 1929 



April 22,1931 



July 7, 1931 



July 15,1931 



Aug. 7, 1931 



Nov. 25,1931 



Nov. 7, 1931 
Nov. 28, 1931 



Date of 
Completion 
of Contract 



Sept. 15, 1931 



Oct. 29, 1931 



Sept. 23, 1931 



Oct. 27,1931 



Dec. 24,1931 



9 



Prices of Principal Items of Contraot 



Sale and purchase to include all electricity generated 
after deduction of that used by Commission in con- 
nection with operation of its Sudbury Power Sta- 
tion. Contract to continue for 10 years. 

For furnishing 3 vertical fire-tube boilers, 98 inches in 
diameter and 24 feet in height, with appurtenances, 
for working steam pressure of 185 pounds per square 
inch, $5,983 each; two at Chestnut Hill Pumping 
Station No. 1 and one at Spot Pond Pumping Sta- 
tion. 

For furnishing and erecting picket fence, $1,895 per 
per linear foot. 

For removing two old boilers at Chestnut Hill Pump- 
ing Station No. 1, $430, and two old boilers at Spot 
Pond Pumping Station, $460; for unloading from 
car and erecting on foundations two new boilers at 
Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 1 T $990, and un- 
loading from car, transporting and erecting on foun- 
dation one new boiler at Spot Pond Pumping Sta- 
tion, $670. 

For furnishing, delivering and laying 36-inch and 30- 
inch steel pipe, $4,670. 



For furnishing and applying non-heat-conducting cov- 
ering to boilers Nos. 26 and 27, including smoke bon- 
nets, nozzles and miscellaneous piping at Chestnut 
Hill Pumping Station No. 1, $968, and to boiler No. 
25, including smoke bonnets, nozzles and miscella- 
neous piping at Spot Pond Pumping Station, $568. 

For repairing roofs of Chestnut Hill Pumping Stations 
tions Nos. 1 and 2 and Machine Shop ,$1,165. 

For rewinding stators and furnishing and installing 
new field coil washers and wedges of generators Nos. 
1 and 3, $7,000. 



10 



Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 1931 



$78,897 10 



18,144 25 



10,894 36 
2,550 00 



4,670 00 



1,536 00 



88 



P. D. 48 



Contracts Made and Pending during the Year 1931 — Water Division 

Concluded 

Summary of Contracts, 1895 to 1931, Inclusive ' 



Distribution Section, 7 contracts . 

476 contracts completed from 1896 to 1930 



Deduct for work done on 11 Sudbury Reservoir contracts by the city of Boston 
Total of 483 contracts 



Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 1931 



8526,007 17 
21,773,264 55 



$22,299,271 72 
512,000 00 



$21,787,271 72 



*ln this summary contracts for the sale of used material and contracts charged to maintenance are 
excluded. 



P. D. 48 



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8udbury Watershed: 

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Average, Wachusett Watershed . 
Average, Sudbury Watershed 



90 P. D. 48 

Table No. 2. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 1981 



Date 


Amount 


Duration 


Date 


Amount 


Duration 


Jan. 5 . 


\ 1.27 


5.20 p.m. to 


July 14 . 


.18 


8.00 a.m. to 9.30 a.m. 


Jan. 6 


6. A.M. 


July 15 . 


\ .04 


9.55 p.m. to 


Jan. 6 . 


.05 i 


7.00 a.m. to 4.20 p.m. 


July 16 


1.15 A.M. 


Jan. 12 . 


| .83 i 


10.30 a.m. to 


July 21 . 


.01 


3.35 a.m. to 5.45 a.m. 


Jan. 13 


1.00 A.M. 


July 22 . 


.05 


3.25 a.m. to 4.25 a.m. 


Jan. 19 . 


.70 ' 


7.00 a.m. to 7.00 p.m. 


July 22 . 


.09 


9.20 a.m. to 11.00 a.m. 


Jan. 29 . 


.12 2 


9.30 a.m. to 3.00 p.m. 


July 24 . 


.06 


8.00 a.m. to 10.30 A.M. 


Jan. 30 . 


1 .81 2 


5.40 p.m. to 


July 24 . 


.02 


6.30 p.m. to 7.00 p.m. 


Jan. 31 


1.00 P.M. 


July 29 . 
Total . 


.07 


8.15 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 


Total . 


3.78 


1.89 




Feb. 2 . 


.06 2 


1.00 A.M. to 7.00 A.M. 


Aug. 2 . 


) .06 


10.05 p.m. to 


Feb. 7 . 


1 .26 ! 


11.40 p.m. to 


Aug. 3 


3.50 a.m. 


Feb. 8 


/ 


11.30 p.m. 


Aug. 3 . 


.10 


7.30 p.m. to 10.40 p.m. 


Feb. 9 . 


1 .502 


7.00 a.m. to 


Aug. 7 . 


.15 


3.10 p.m. to 3.30 p.m. 


Feb. 10 


J 


7.00 A.M. 


Aug. 10 . 


\ .03 


7.45 a.m. to 


Feb. 13 . 


1 .321 


10.45 p.m. to 


Aug. 11 


/ 


1.00 A.M. 


Feb. 14 


j 


12.00 m. 


Aug. 11 . 


1 1.88 


11.20 p.m. to 


Feb. 18 . 


\ 2 . 33 1 


1.15 A.M. to 


Aug. 12 


J 


5.00 p.m. 


Feb. 20 


/ 


6.30 p.m. 


Aug. 14 . 


.18 


2.20 p.m. to 3.15 p.m. 








Aug. 15 . 


.13 


11.45 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. 






Total 


3.47 




Aug. 19 . 
Aug. 23 . 
Aug. 24 


.18 
\ .04 


11.55 a.m. to 3.10 P.M. 
10.00 p.m. to 

1.00 a.m. 


Mar. 3 


\ .692 


2.45 p.m. to 


Mar. 5 


10.00 A.M. 


Aug. 24 . 


.17 


1.00 p.m. to 9.40 p.m. 


Mar. 6. 


.04 


9.00 A.M. to 10.00 A.M. 


Aug. 27 . 


1 2.81 


5.20 a.m. to 


Mar. 8. 


2.071 


7.50 a.m. to 11.40 p.m. 


Aug. 28 


5.40 p.m. 


Mar. 10. 


\ .041 


4.15 a.m. to 


Aug. 30 . 


.04 


10.00 p.m. to 10.30 p.m. 


Mar. 11 
Mar. 16. 


r 


6.45 a.m. 








1 .081 


7.50 a.m. to 


Total . 


5.77 




Mar. 17 
Mar. 25. 


f 


12.45 a.m. 








1 .731 


2.40 a.m. to 


Sept. 2. 


\ .56 


9.00 p.m. to 


Mar. 26 


j 


10.00 A.M. 


Sept. 3 


6.30 a.m. 


Mar. 28. 


1 1.26 


9.40 p.m. to 


Sept. 3 . 


.17 


10.30 a.m. to 8.30 p.m. 


Mar. 29 


/ 


8.30 p.m. 


Sept. 15. 


.07 


2.45 p.m. to 3.00 p.m. 








Sept. 15. 
Sept. 16 
Sept. 17. 
Sept. 20. 


| .52 

.08 
.27 


8.30 p.m. to 

12.45 a.m. 
5.00 a.m. to 2.00 p.m. 
6.30 a.m. to 10.00 p.m. 


Total . 


4.91 




Apr. 1 . 


}' 75 


6.45 a.m. to 


Apr. 2 


6.30 p.m. 


Sept. 22. 


.02 


6.30 p.m. to 9.45 p.m. 


Apr. 4 . 


.29 


12.15 a.m. to 6.15 A.M. 


Sept. 24. 


.11 


10.00 a.m. to 10.30 A.M. 


Apr. 7 . 


\ .55 


1.00 A.M. to 


Sept. 26. 


.10 


4.00 p.m. to 11.45 p.m. 


Apr. 8 
Apr. 23 . 


( 


4.30 a.m. 








.12 


3.35 a.m. to 


Total . 


1.90 




Apr. 24 
Apr. 26 . 


j 


1.45 A.M. 








1.34 


3.35 a.m. to 9.30 p.m. 


Oct. 7 . 


.05 


4.30 p.m. to 5.30 p.m. 


Apr. 29 . 


.03 


9.00 a.m. to 3.00 p.m. 


Oct. 8 . 


.02 


5.20 p.m. to 8.30 p.m. 








Oct. 14 . 
Oct. 16 
Oct. 25 . 
Oct. 25 . 


J 1.35 

.04 
.11 


10.15 p.m. to 

5.45 p.m. 
2.30 a.m. to 6.50 a.m. 
2.00 p.m. to 4.15 p.m. 


Total . 


3.08 




May 8 . 


1.36 


4.50 a.m. to 11.20 p.m. 


May 10 . 


\ .59 


9.15 a.m. to 


Oct. 28 . 


) .76 


2.50 a.m. to 


May 11 . 


I 


5.00 A.M. 


Oct. 29 


9.30 p.m. 


May 13 . 


1 1.22 


2.30 A.M. to 












May 15 


J 


2.15 A.M., 


Total . 


2.33 




May 16 . 

May 17 


j .06 


5 00 p m to 








4.45 a.m. 


Nov. 2 . 


.01 


10.00 p.m. to 11.00 P.M. 


May 21 . 


.55 


9.00 a.m. to 4.45 p.m. 


Nov. 3 . 


\ .04 


9.45 p.m. to 


May 23 . 


.32 


2.20 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. 


Nov, 4 


2.40 a.m. 


May 31 . 


\ .32 


10.00 p.m. to 


Nov. 12. 


.01 


1.30 p.m. to 2.30 p.m. 


June 1 


5.15 A.M. 


Nov. 15. 


\ .53 

.02 
.02 
.29 


11.20 a.m. to 








Nov. 21 
Nov. 27. 
Nov. 28. 
Nov. 30. 


7.00 A.M. 

1.00 p.m. to 5.00 p.m. 
9.45 p.m. to 11.00 p.m. 
8.00 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. 


Total . 


4.42 




June 1 . 


.02 


7.30 a.m. to 9.00 p.m. 


June 7 . 


.39 


11.00 a.m. to 2.00 P.M. 












June 8 . 
June 1 1 
June 12. 


15.64 
.02 


8.30 p.m. to 

4.15 p.m. 


Total . 


.92 




4.45 a.m. to 11.00 a.m. 


Dec. 4 . 


.91 


9.15 a.m. to 11.30 P.M. 


June 15. 


\2.77 


10.30 p.m. to 


Dec. 9 . 


\ .431 


11.45 A.M. to 


June 17 


) 


12.45 p.m. 


Dec. 10 


J 


12.15 A.M. 


June 23 . 


\ .19 


2.30 p.m. to 


Dec. 11 . 


i .14 


12.15 p.m. to 


June 24 


J 


3.15 a.m. 


Dec. 12 


J 


7.00 A.M. 


June 26 . 


.11 


9.10 p.m. to 9.45 p.m. 


Dec. 13 . 


1 .52 

.06 2 
\ .79 


11.00 a.m. to 








Dec. 14 
Dec. 20 . 
Dec. 22 . 
Dec. 23 


6.00 p.m. 


Total . 


9.14 




7.00 a.m. to 3.15 p.m. 
5.45 a.m. to 

7.00 A.M. 


July 1 . 


.01 


5.00 p.m. to 5.10 p.m. 


July 4 . 


.02 


2.45 p.m. to 3.15 p.m. 


Dec. 24 . 


( .28 


8.15 p.m. to 


July 6 . 


\ 1.13 
.06 


10.45 a.m. to 


Dec. 25 


/ 


2.30 a.m. 


July 7 
July 8 . 


3.45 p.m. 
1.45 p.m. to 2.30 p.m. 


Dec. 25 . 


.03 


9.30 a.m. to 2.30 p.m. 








July 9 . 


.02 


10.00 p.m. to 11.45 p.m. 


Total . 


3.16 




July 10 . 
July 11 


\ .13 


5.55 p.m. to 

7.15 A.M. 









Total for Year, 44.77 inches. 



i Rain and snow. 



2 Snow. 



P. D. 48 



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94 P. D.. 48 

Table No. 6. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been 
drawn for the Supply of the Metropolitan Water District 

From Wachusett Reservoir into the Wachusett Aqueduct 





Number of 
Days during 


Actual Time 


Million 1 


Month 


which 




Gallons 




Water was 






Drawn 




Flowing 


Hours 


Minutes 




January ....... 


26 


339 


23 


3,912.6 


February . 














13 


159 


40 


1,568.6 


March 














13 


159 


48 


1,320.6 


April 














1 


8 





15.0 


May 














19 


97 


7 


1,349.1 


June 














22 


126 


14 


1,835.2 


July 














26 


231 


26 


3,361.7 


August 














26 


334 


42 


4,860 . 5 


September 














25 


303 


53 


4,428 . 9 


October 














26 


275 


20 


4,025.7 


November 












23 


232 


51 


3,375.3 


December 












26 


266 


20 


3,872.9 


Totals 


• 












246 


105.614 days 


33,926.1 



including quantity supplied to Westborough State Hospital. 



From Sudbury Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct to Weston Reservoir 




Number of 


Actual Time 






Days during 




Million 


Month 


which 
Water was 




Gallons 








Drawn 




Flowing 


Hours 


Minutes 




January ....... 


31 


735i 


30 


2,490.51 


February 














28 


570 


00 


2,429.5 


March 














31 


633 


30 


2,620.6 


April 














30 


588 


00 


2,389.4 


May 














31 


600 


22 


2,424 . 8 


June 














30 


609 


30 


2,410.6 


July 














31 


630 


30 


2,510.0 


August 














31 


648 


30 


2,992.3 


September 












30 


610 


20 


2,875.5 


October 












31 


629 


40 


3,035.4 


November 












30 


616 


30 


2,961.7 


December 












31 


633 


37 


3,065.3 


Totals 














365 


312.749 days 


32,205 6 



i Included in this time, and in the amount of water, is 605 hrs. and 2,004.4 million gallons of water 
by-passed. 



From Framingham Reservoir No. 3 through the Sudbury Aqueduct to Chestnut 

Hill Reservoir 





Number of 


l 

Actual Time 






Days during 




Million 


Month 


which 




Gallons 




Water was 






Drawn 




Flowing 


Hours 


Minutes 




January ...... 


31 


744 


— 


552.2 


February 














28 


672 


- 


432.6 


March 














31 


744 


— 


323.9 


April 














30 


719 


- 


442.6 


May 














31 


744 


— 


577 . 9 


June 














30 


720 


- 


801.6 


July 














31 


744 


- 


1,288.3 


August 














31 


744 


- 


732.4 


September 














30 


721 


- 


757.5 


October . 














31 


734 


45 


804.1 


November 














30 


720 


- 


961.8 


December 














31 


744 


— 


1,005.5 


Totals 


t 


► 




t 


I 




365 


364.615 days 


8,680.4 



P. D. 48 



95 



Table No. 7. — Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts in 

1931 by Months 





Wachusett 


Weston 


Sudbury 


Cochituate 




Aqueduct 


Aqueduct 


Aqueduct 


Aqueduct 




into 


into 


into 


into 


Month 


Sudbury 


Metropolitan 


Chestnut Hill 


Chestnut Hill 




Reservoir 


District 


Reservoir 


Reservoir 




(Gallons) 


(Gallons) 


(Gallons) 


(Gallons) 


January ...... 


126,058,000 


80,339,000 


24,919,000 


16,684,000 


February 














55,854,000 


86,768,000 


19,689,000 


17,475,000 


March . 














42,445,000 


84,535,000 


16,413,000 


22,003,000 


April . 














354,000 


79,758,000 


21,003,000 


17,571,000 


May 














43,371,000 


78,219,000 


26,816,000 


18,174,000 


June 














61,020,000 


80,353,000 


31,110,000 


19,177,000 


July 














108,277,000 


80,968,000 


41,558,000 


17,310,000 


August 














156,626,000 


96,526,000 


23,626,000 


15,810,000 


September 














147,269,000 


95,717,000 


25,215,000 


15,522,000 


October 














129,703,000 


97,916,000 


25,939,000 


11,777,000 


November 














112,343,000 


98,723,000 


32,060,000 


- 


December 














124,777,000 


98,881,000 


32,435,000 


— 


Average 














92,791,000 


88,234,000 


26,784,000 


14,279,000 



96 



P. D. 48 



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P. D. 48 



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cococococococococococococo 




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1—1 

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O 


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on Evapo- 
ration 




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2 
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V. faintly vegetable. 
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P. D. 48 



103 



Table No. 15. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, 

1898-1931 

[Parte per 100,000] 









Color 


Residue on 
Evaporation 


Ammonia 


CD 
.9 


V OQ 






Si 




a 
°"3 




ALBUMINOID 


a 


Year 




i t* 


T3 
i ^ 


V 

a 




■is a 


C3 




a> 


03 


ia JJ 


cot3 


o 


m c 


T3 




ts a 


<+> 


0Q M 


CD 


43 


^r > 


5 o 
a 


1—4 


>>o 


M 






o 
H 


OH 


h 


o 
H 


Qo 

CO 




£° 


OS 


1898 . 


.40 


4.19 


1.60 


.0008 


.0152 


.0136 


.0016 


.29 


.44 


1.4 


1899 . 






.28 


3.70 


1.30 


.0006 


.0136 


.0122 


.0014 


.24 


.35 


1.1 


1900 . 






.29 


3.80 


1.20 


.0012 


.0157 


.0139 


.0018 


.25 


.38 


1.3 


1901 . 






.29 


4.43 


1.64 


.0013 


.0158 


.0142 


.0016 


.30 


.42 


1.7 


1902 . 






.30 


3.93 


1.56 


.0016 


.0139 


.0119 


.0020 


.29 


.40 


1.3 


1903 . 






.29 


3.98 


1.50 


.0013 


.0125 


.0110 


.0015 


.30 


.39 


1.5 


1904 . 






.23 


3.93 


1.59 


.0023 


.0139 


.0121 


.0018 


.34 


.37 


1.5 


1905 . 






.24 


3.86 


1.59 


.0020 


.0145 


.0124 


.0021 


.35 


.35 


1.4 


1906 . 






.24 


3.86 


1.39 


.0018 


.0159 


.0134 


.0025 


.34 


.36 


1.3 


1907 . 






.22 


3.83 


1.40 


.0013 


.0129 


.0109 


.0020 


.33 


.32 


1.3 


1908 . 






.19 


3.50 


1.35 


.0011 


.0115 


.0092 


.0024 


.33 


.26 


1.2 


1909 . 






.18 


3.46 


1.43 


.0011 


.0128 


.0103 


.0025 


.28 


.25 


1.3 


1910 . 






.14 


3.05 


1.24 


.0013 


.0118 


.0102 


.0016 


.28 


.22 


1.1 


1911 . 






.25 


4.18 


1.66 


.0015 


.0156 


.0128 


.0029 


.38 


.33 


1.4 


1912 . 






.17 


3.86 


1.23 


.0018 


.0154 


.0119 


.0034 


.36 


.29 


1.7 


1913 . 






.13 


3.96 


1.15 


.0014 


.0150 


.0120 


.0026 


.35 


.26 


1.5 


1914 . 






.14 


4.12 


1.19 


.0014 


.0138 


.0116 


.0022 


.39 


.25 


1.4 


1915 . 






.16 


3.73 


1.04 


.0015 


.0157 


.0134 


.0023 


.38 


.25 


1.4 


1916 . 






.18 


4.53 


1.85 


.0013 


.0133 


.0107 


.0026 


.36 


— 


1.4 


1917 . 






.15 


4.45 


1.68 


.0015 


.0142 


.0124 


.0018 


.33 


— 


1.3 


1918 . 






.18 


3.89 


1.45 


.0019 


.0154 


.0128 


.0026 


.29 


— 


1.4 


1919 . 






.20 


4.28 


1.41 


.0010 


.0130 


.0108 


.0022 


.36 


— 


1.5 


1920 . 






.17 


4.23 


1.35 


.0012 


.0112 


.0097 


.0014 


.33 


— 


1.5 


1921 . 






.13 


3.80 


1.39 


.0006 


.0104 


.0089 


.0015 


.25 


— 


1.4 


1922 . 






.16 


3.98 


1.55 


.0011 


.0097 


.0080 


.0017 


.30 


— 


1.8 


1923 . 






.15 


3.90 


1.45 


.0011 


.0100 


.0090 


.0010 


.26 


— 


1.5 


1924 . 






.12 


4.10 


1.60 


.0011 


.0109 


.0084 


.0025 


.28 


— 


1.5 


1925 . 






.09 


3.98 


1.62 


.0013 


.0109 


.0093 


.0016 


.29 


— 


1.5 


1926 . 






.10 


4.18 


1.68 


.0015 


.0115 


.0092 


.0023 


.32 


— 


1.5 


1927 . 






.22 


4.47 


1.62 


.0013 


.0111 


.0101 


.0018 


.34 


— 


1.9 


1928 . 






.27 


4.43 


1.72 


.0011 


.0124 


.0106 


.0018 


.37 


— 


1.5 


1929 . 






.21 


4.26 


1.71 


.0007 


.0106 


.0074 


.0032 


.30 


— 


1.3 


1930 . 






.16 


4.07 


1.34 


.0012 


.0071 


.0055 


.0016 


.34 


— 


1.3 


1931 . 






.24 


4.88 


1.64 


.0013 


.0097 


.0072 


.0025 


.45 


- 


2.0 



Table No. 16. — Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water from Vari- 
ous Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works, 1898-1931. {Averages of 
Weekly Determinations.) 





Chestnut Hill Reservoir 


Southern Service Taps 


Year 


Sudbury 
Aqueduct 
Terminal 
Chamber 


Cochituate 
Aqueduct 


Effluent 
Gate-house 
No. 2 


Low Service, 

182 Boylston 

Street 


High Service, 

20 Somerset 

Street 


1898 


207 


145 


111 


96 


— 


1899 


224 


104 


217 


117 


123 


1900 


248 


113 


256 


188 


181 


1901 


225 


149 


169 


162 


168 


1902 


203 


168 


121 


164 


246 


19p3 


76 


120 


96 


126 


243 


1904 


347 


172 


220 


176 


355 


1905 


495 


396 


489 


231 


442 


1906 


231 


145 


246 


154 


261 


1907 


147 


246 


118 


130 


176 


1908 ...... 


162 


138 


137 


136 


148 


1909 


198 


229 


119 


150 


195 


1910 


216 


- 


180 


178 


213 


1911 


205 


204 


151 


175 


197 


1912 


429 


450 


227 


249 


259 


1913 


123 


243 


157 


119 


140 


1914 


288 


— 


252 


174 


220 


1915 


163 


— 


128 


117 


134 


1916 


128 


— 


85 


102 


105 


1917 ... . 


178 


112 


119 


119 


141 


1918 


1,163 


168 


705 


317 


544 


1919 


92 


85 


100 


70 


84 


1920 


148 


86 


108 


113 


112 


1921 


103 


— 


83 


92 


92 


1922 


163 


— 


153 


160 


172 


1923 


229 


- 


178 


217 


230 


1924 


137 


- 


96 


150 


160 


1925 


144 


251 


120 


155 


174 


1926 


167 


— 


118 


130 


137 


1927 


119 


185 


70 


81 


101 


1928 


144 


32 


86 


106 


106 


1929 


128 


— 


84 


130 


144 


1930 


107 


66 


105 


123 


1931 


82* 


4* 1 43 


80 


101 



♦After the water was sterilized with chlorine. 






104 



P. D. 48 






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Belmont 

Boston 

Brookline 

Chelsea 

Everett 

Lexington 

Maiden 

Medford 

Melrose 

Milton 

Nahant 

Newton 

Quincy 

Revere 

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Swampsco 

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P. D. 48 



109 



Table No. 22. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters, Per Cent of Services Met- 
ered, Fire Services and Fire Hydrants in the Several Cities and Towns in 
the Metropolitan Water District, December 31, 1931 











Services 










Per Cent 


Used for 




City or Town 


Services 


Meters 


of Services 


Fire 


Fire 








Metered 


Purposes 
Only 


Hydrants 


Arlington ..... 


7,098 


7,098 


100.00 


32 


835 


Belmont 








4,496 


4,496 


100.00 


7 


473 


Boston . 








100,508 


100,508 


100.00 


3,112 


11,889 


Chelsea . 








5,864 


5,864 


100.00 


139 


449 


Everett 








7,363 


7,363 


100.00 


51 


623 


Lexington 








2,459 


2,459 


100.00 


6 


476 


Maiden . 








9,727 


9,700 


99.72 


75 


722 


Medford 








10,727 


10,727 


100.00 


31 


1,035 


Melrose . 








5,841 


5,841 


100.00 


25 


463 


Milton . 








4,095 


4,095 


100. 00 


3 


653 


Nahant . 








931 


931 


100.00 


2 


144 


Quincy . 








16,815 


16,720 


99.44 


51 


1,747 


Revere 








6,386 


6,375 


99.83 


9 


480 


Somerville 








14,141 


13,985 


98.90 


121 


1,388 


Stoneham 








2,363 


2,353 


99.58 


2 


184 


Swampscott 








2,705 


2,705 


100.00 


5 


279 


Watertown 








6,079 


6,079 


100.00 


41 


655 


Winthrop 








3,810 


3,810 


100.00 


7 


377 


District Supplied 


211,408 


211,109 


99.86 


3,719 


22,872 


Brookline 








7,742 


7,736 


99.92 


32 


977 


Newton . 








14,829 


14,829 


100.00 


100 


1,511 


Total District 


• < 






233,979 


233,674 


99.87 


3,851 


25,360 



110 



P. D. 48 



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P. D. 48 



Appendix No. 4 



Contracts made and pending during 

Contracts relating to the 



l 


2 

Work 


3 

Number 

of 

Bids 


Amount of Bid 




Number 
of 

Contract 


4 

Next to 
Lowest 


5 

Lowest 


6 

Contractor 


1 492 

2 55 


Relocation of Old Mystic 
Valley Sewer, Aber- 
jona River Crossing, 
Winchester. 

Section 82, Mill Brook 
Valley Sewer, North 
Metropolitan System, 
in Arlington. 


6 
21 


$4,470 00 
10,866 00 


$4,145 001 
8,080 001 


George M. Bryne, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

N. Cibotti Co., Hyde 
Park, Mass. 



Contracts relating to the 



3 


322 


Furnishing labor and ma- 
terial for making bor- 
ings, New Neponset 
Valley Sewer, South 
Metropolitan System, 
in Milton. 


3 


$1.10 per 
lin. ft. 


$0.95! per lin. 
ft. 


Edward P. Healey, 
Roxbury, Mass. 


4 


382 


Section 111, New Nepon- 
set Valley Sewer, South 
Metropolitan System, 
in Milton and Canton. 


12 


152,667 50 


149,675 00 i 


Frank W. Christy, 
Providence, R. I. 


5 


392 


Section 112, New Nepon- 
set Valley Sewer, South 
Metropolitan System, 
in Canton. 


11 


155,100 00 


149,147 50 1 


C. & R. Construction 
Co., Boston, Mass. 


6 


412 


Section 113, New Nepon- 
set Valley Sewer, South 
Metropolitan System, 
in Canton. 


10 


124,900 00 


121,750 00i 


Anthony Baruffaldi, 
West Somerville, 
Mass. 


7 


42 


Section 114, New Nepon- 
set Valley Sewer, South 
Metropolitan System, 
in Canton. 


14 


118,257 00 


105,950 001 


V. Barletta Co., 
Roslindale, Mass. 


8 


432 


Section 115, New Nepon- 
set Valley Sewer, South 
Metropolitan Systern, 
in Canton. 


17 


91,692 50 


91,325 001 


A. D. Daddario, 
Boston, Mass. 


9 


36-A 


Part of Section 109, New 
Neponset Valley Sewer, 
South Metropolitan 
System, in Milton. 


10 


187,343 50 


179,585 00i 


V. Barletta Co., 
Roslindale, Mass. 


10 


37-A 


Part of Section 110, New 
Neponset Valley Sewer, 
South Metropolitan 
System, in Milton. 


8 


247,568 00 


225,704 001 


J. H. Ferguson Co., 
Providence, R. I. 


11 


442 


Section 116, New Nepon- 
set Valley Sewer, South 
Metropolitan System, 
in Canton and Nor- 
wood. 


14 


76,290 00 


71,770 00' 


A. D. Daddario, 
Boston, Mass. 



1 Contract based upon this bid. 



2 Oontraot completed. 



P. D. 48 



113 



Appendix No. 4 



the Year 1931. — Sewerage Division 
North Metropolitan System 



Date of 
Contract 



8 

Date of 

Completion 

of Work 



June 20, 1931 



Dec. 23, 1931 



Aug. 25, 1931 



9 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts made 

in 1931 



For excavation and refilling in trench for 26" by 28" 
concrete and brick sewer, and 20" cast-iron pipe 
siphon and laying of pipe, $25.00 per lin. ft.; for 
Portland cement brick masonry in sewer and man- 
holes, $35.00 per cu. yd. ; for Portland cement con- 
crete masonry in trench for sewer, siphon, and spe- 
cial structures, $12.00 per cu. yd. ; for rock excava- 
tion in trench and retaining walls, $3.00 per cu. yd. 

For excavation and refilling in trench for 20" vitri- 
fied pipe main sewer and laying of pipe, $2.50 per 
lin. ft. ; for Portland cement brick masonry in man- 
holes and special structures, $28.00 per cu. yd. ; for 
Portland cement concrete masonry in trench and 
special structures, $6.00 per cu. yd.; for Portland 
cement boulder concrete masonry in trench, $3.00 
per cu. yd.; for bank gravel refilling around pipe 
sewer in trench, $2.50 per cu. yd.; for rock exca- 
vation in trench, $0.50 per cu. yd. 



10 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1931 



$4,219 28 



South Metropolitan System 



April 4, 1929 


Jan. 21, 1931 


- - - 


$14,325 363 


3 


Apr. 11, 1930 


Oct. 27, 1931 




182,066 72 


4 


Apr. 14, 1930 


Dec. 12, 1931 


- - - 


175,511 41 


5 


June 19, 1930 


Oct. 25, 1931 


_ _ 


144,759 15 


6 


Oct. 23, 1930 


- 


- - - 


97,545 00 


7 


Oct. 16, 1930 


Oct. 7, 1931 


• 


113,251 95 


8 


Nov. 13, 1930 


- 


- - - 


174,116 93 


9 


Nov. 13, 1930 


- 


- 


243,418 50 


10 


Dec. 24, 1930 


Oct. 25, 1931 


- - - 


86,428 41 


11 



3 Contract extended at same rate to cover additional borings in Canton, Stoughton, Norwood, Walpole, 
Braintree, Weymouth and Quincy. 



114 



P. D. 48 



Appendix No. 4 



Contracts made and pending during the 

Contracts relating to the 



l 

Number 
of 
Contract 



12 



13 



452 



46 



14 47 



15 482 



16 50 



17 51 



18 52 



2 

Work 



Furnishing and installing 
new staybolts in two 
vertical boilers at Ward 
Street Pumping Station, 

Section 117, New Nepon- 
set Valley Sewer, South 
Metropolitan System, 
in Norwood. 



Section 119, New Nepon- 
set Valley Sewer, South 
Metropolitan System, 
in Canton. 



Removing two old and 
furnishing and placing 
two new vertical boilers 
at Ward Street Pump- 
ing Station. 

Section 118, New Nepon- 
set Valley Sewer, South 
Metropolitan System, 
in Norwood and Wal- 
pole. 



Squantum Pumping Sta- 
tion, including receiv- 
ing reservoir pump 
well, building founda- 
tions, and connecting 
sewers. 



Section 125, Braintree- 
Weymouth Sewer, 
South Metropolitan 
System, in Braintree 
and Weymouth. 



Number 

of 

Bids 



13 



11 



15 



15 



Amount of Bid 



Next to 
Lowest 



$2,490 00 



104,489 40 



47,622 00 



8,983 00 



61,442 50 



39,017 50 



5 

Lowest 



$2,325 00 1 



96,062 50 1 



42,112 801 



8,980 00 1 



58,715 OQi 



37,630 OQi 



105,325 90 100,951 00 1 



6 



Contractor 



International Engineer 
ing Works, Inc., 
Framingham, Mass. 



J. F. Fitzgerald Con- 
struction Co., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 



Frank W. Christy, 
Providence, R. I. 



D. M. Dillon Steam 
Boiler Works, Fitch- 
burg, Mass. 



C. & R. Construction 
Co., Boston, Mass. 



A. D. Daddario, 
Mattapan, Mass. 



George M. Bryne, 
Boston, Mass. 



1 Contract baaed upon this bid. 



2 Contract completed. 



P. D. 48 



115 



Appendix No. 4 



Year 1931. — Sewerage Division. — Continued 
South Metropolitan System. — Continued 



Date of 
Contract 



Feb. 19, 1931 



Mar. 26, 1931 



Mar. 26, 1931 



May 14, 1931 



8 

Date of 

Completion 

of Work 



May 7, 1931 



Nov. 6, 1931 



Aug. 6, 1931 



Aug. 24, 1931 



Nov. 5, 1931 



9 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts made 
in 1931 



For furnishing all labor, tools, materials and appli- 
ances necessary for removing old staybolts and fur- 
nishing and installing new lj^-inch stayboltB in 
two vertical boilers. 

For earth excavation and refilling in trench for 48" 
by 51" concrete sewer, $7.50 per lin. ft.; for earth 
excavation and refilling in trench and laying of 
pipe for 36" cast-iron pipe siphon, $21.00 per lin. 
ft.; for Portland cement brick masonry in man- 
holes, head-houses, and special structures, $28.00 
per cu. yd. ; for Portland cement concrete masonry 
in trench for sewer, siphon and special structures, 
$8.00 per cu. yd.; for Portland cement boulder 
concrete masonry in trench for sewer and siphon, 
$6.00 per cu. yd.; for rock excavation in trench, 
$2.00 per cu. yd. 

For earth excavation and refilling in trench for 33" by 
36" and 24" x 27" concrete sewer and 30" cast- 
iron pipe crossing, $6.16 per lin. ft.; for Portland 
cement brick masonry in manholes and special 
structures, $32.00 per cu. yd. ; for Portland cement 
concrete masonry in trench, pipe crossing and spe- 
cial structures, $9.00 per cu. yd.; for Portland 
cement boulder concrete in trench, $2.00 per cu. 
yd. ; for rock excavation in trench, $5.00 per cu. yd. 

For removing two old boilers and for furnishing all 
material and constructing and erecting, ready for 
connecting, two new vertical internally-fired boilers. 



For earth excavation and refilling in trench for 36" 
by 39" concrete sewer, $6.00 per lin. ft.; for earth 
excavation, and refilling in trench for 30" by 33" 
concrete sewer and 30" cast-iron pipe, $3.00 per 
lin. ft. ; for Portland cement brick masonry in man- 
holes and special structures, $30.00 per cu. yd.; 
for Portland cement concrete masonry for sewer, 
pipe crossing and special structures, $10.00 per cu. 
yd.; for Portland cement boulder concrete ma- 
sonry in trench for sewer, $2.00 per cu. yd.; for 
rock excavation in trench, $6.50 per cu. yd. 

For earth excavation and refilling in receiving reser- 
voir, pump well and building foundations, $8,000.00 
lump sum; for earth excavation and refilling in 
trench, for 24" x 30" concrete sewer and 16" cast- 
iron pipe, $4.00 per lin. ft.; for Portland cement 
brick masonry in manholes and special structures, 
$30.00 per cu. yd.; for Portland cement concrete 
masonry in sewer, receiving reservoir, pump well, 
building foundations and floors, $13.00 per cu. yd.; 
for granite masonry in receiving reservoir and pump 
well, $10 per cu. yd.; for spruce piles in trench, 
$0.50 per lin. ft.: for steel reinforcing rods, beams, 
plates, etc., $50.00 per ton. 

For earth excavation and refilling in harbor bed for 
42" and 30" cast-iron pipe siphons including foun- 
dations, $17.37 per lin. ft. ; for furnishing and plac- 
ing 42" and 30" bell and spigot cast-iron pipe, 
$51.00 per ton; for earth excavation and refilling 
in trench for 48" by 51" concrete sewer, $9.00 per 
lin. ft.; for Portland cement brick masonry in man- 
holes, head-houses and special structures, $35.00 
per cu. yd. ; for Portland cement concrete masonry 
in sewer, head-houses, and appurtenances in trench, 
$12.00 per cu. yd.; for Portland cement boulder 
concrete masonry in trenches, $10.00 per cu. yd.; 
for riprap paving with Portland concrete joints, 
$5.00 per cu. yd.; for rock excavation in siphon 
trenches, $30.00 per cu. yd. 



10 

Value of 

Work done 

Deo. 31, 

1931 



$2,325 00 



84,785 50 



45,286 00 



8,819 63 



26,227 50 



10,215 00 



12 



13 



14 



15 



16 



17 



18 



3 Contract extended at same rate to cover additional borings in Canton, Stoughton, Norwood, Walpolt, 
Braintree, Weymouth and Quincy. 



116 



P. D. 48 



Appendix No. 4 



Contracts made and pending during the 

Contracts relating to the 



1 


2 


3 

Number 


Amouni 


! or Bid 




Number 


4 


5 


6 


of 
Contract 


Work 


of 
Bids 


Next to 
Lowest 


Lowest 


Contractor 


19 53 


Proposed pumping units 
for the Squantum 
Pumping Station, South 
Metropolitan System, 
in Quincy. 


6 


$7,780 00 


$7,775 00i 


Turbine Equipment 
Co. of New England, 
Boston, Mass. 


20 54 


Section 120, New Nepon- 
set Valley Sewer, South 
Metropolitan System, 


17 


52,500 001 


44,400 00 


Anthony Baruffaldi, 
West Somerville, 
Mass. 




in Canton. 











1 Contract based upon this bid. 



P.D. 48 



117 



Appendix No. 4 



Year 1931 — Sewerage Division. — Continued 
South Metropolitan System. — Continued 



7 

Date of 
Contract 


8 

Date of 

Completion 

of Work 


9 

Prices of Principal Items of Contracts made 

in 1931 


10 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1931 




Dec. 10, 1931 
Dec. 10, 1931 


- 


For furnishing and erecting, ready for operation, two 
electrically driven pumping units including founda- 
tions, electric motors, vertical centrifugal pumps, 
shafting, bearings, piping, valves, railings, switch- 
board, controls, meters, wiring, etc., in the Pump- 
ing Station Building at Squantum, City of Quincy, 
Massachusetts, the lump sum of $7,775.00. 

For excavation and refilling in trench for 27" by 36" 
concrete sewer, $8.00 per lin. ft. ; for excavation of 
earth, or rock, or both, and refilling in tunnel for 
27" by 36" masonry sewer, $30.00 per lin. ft.; for 
Portland cement brick masonry in manholes and 
special structures in trench, $20.00 per cu. yd.; 
for Portland cement brick masonry in tunnel and 
tunnel shafts, $20.00 per cu. yd.; for Portland 
cement concrete masonry in trench and special 
structures, $6.00 per cu. yd.; for Portland cement 
concrete masonry in tunnel and tunnel shafts, $6.00 
per cu. yd. ; for rock excavation in trench, $1.00 per 
cu. yd. 


- 


19 
20 



118 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1931 

Division — Concluded 

Summary of Contracts 



P. D. 48 
Sewerage 



North Metropolitan System, 2 Contracts 

South Metropolitan System, 18 Contracts 

Total of 20 contraote made and pending during the year 1931 



Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 1031 



$4,219 28 
1,409,082 06 



$1,413,301 34 



THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



OF THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FORM NO. U22; 4.6.36: 5M. 



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